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Arts
Sculpture and Statues

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Eros
The Fourth Plinth
Statue of Liberty
Mount Rushmore
Rodin
Other Sculptors
Subjects
Miscellaneous

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Sculpture and Statues

Eros

The Angel of Christian Charity was a name proposed at one time for Click to show or hide the answer
Eros was originally supposed to represent (Eros's brother) Click to show or hide the answer
Sculptor of Eros Click to show or hide the answer
Eros forms part of a memorial to (19th century campaigner against child labour) Click to show or hide the answer
Eros was one of the first statues to be made of Click to show or hide the answer

The Fourth Plinth

London's Trafalgar Square was originally going to be called King William IV's Square. It has a large plinth in each corner, and the one in the north–west corner was originally intended to hold an equestrian statue of William IV. But when the square was completed, in 1845, there were no funds for the statue. The plinth remained empty until 1999, when the Royal Society commissioned a series of three contemporary sculptures to be displayed temporarily on it:

Dates Title Artist Description
1999 Click to show or hide the answer Mark Wallinger A life–size (i.e. quite small) statue of Jesus, wearing only a loincloth and a crown of barbed wire
2000 Click to show or hide the answer Bill Woodrow A head crushed between a book and the roots of a giant tree
2001 Click to show or hide the answer Rachel Whiteread A cast of the plinth in transparent resin, placed upside–down on top of the original

A subsequent enquiry recommended a rolling programme of temporary artworks.

2005–7 Click to show or hide the answer Marc Quinn A marble torso–bust of the artist who was born with no arms and shortened legs
2007 Click to show or hide the answer Thomas Schütte Architectural model of a 21–storey building, made from coloured glass
2009 Click to show or hide the answer Anthony Gormley 2,400 selected members of the public, each spending one hour on the plinth – a total of 100 days
2010–12 Click to show or hide the answer Yinka Shonibare A replica of HMS Victory, with sails made of printed fabric in a colourful African pattern, inside a large glass bottle stopped with a cork
2012–13 Click to show or hide the answer Michael Elmgreen and Ingar Dragset A bronze sculpture of a boy on a rocking horse
2013–15 Click to show or hide the answer Katharina Fritsch A blue cockerel
2015–16 Click to show or hide the answer Hans Haacke The skeleton of a horse – based on an engraving by Stubbs, in The Anatomy of the Horse (1766) – with an electronic ribbon displaying live the ticker of the London Stock Exchange tied to its front leg, "completing the link between power, money and history"
2016 Click to show or hide the answer David Shrigley A bronze sculpture of a human hand in a thumbs–up gesture, with the thumb greatly elongated

There is a widely–held belief that the long–term plan is for the plinth to hold an equestrian statue of Queen Elizabeth II, after her death; but this has never officially been either confirmed or denied.

The Statue of Liberty

Liberty Enlightening the World: popular name Click to show or hide the answer
Presented by the people of France to the people of America on the centenary of the Declaration of Independence Click to show or hide the answer
Sculptor of the Statue of Liberty Click to show or hide the answer
Engineer of the Statue of Liberty Click to show or hide the answer
Liberty holds in her right hand Click to show or hide the answer
… and in her left hand Click to show or hide the answer
Inscribed on the book Click to show or hide the answer

Mount Rushmore

The Mount Rushmore National Memorial was the brainchild of Doane Robinson, the aging superintendent of the South Dakota State Historical Society, whose vision was to put South Dakota "on the map" and bring tourists to the region. He envisaged that the memorial should depict "western heroes" such as Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Buffalo Bill Cody and Native American chief Red Cloud. Having enlisted the help and support of Senator Peter Norbeck, Robinson contacted the prolific sculptor Gutzon Borglum – who readily agreed to undertake the project, but insisted that the subjects should be US national heroes rather than regional heroes of the mid–west. He personally chose the presidents that he depicted, who were:

Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

The only one wearing spectacles Click to show or hide the answer
The only one with a beard Click to show or hide the answer
The only one with a moustache Click to show or hide the answer

Rodin

The Age of Bronze (1877, a male nude): first major sculpture by Click to show or hide the answer
The Thinker, The Kiss, The Burghers of Calais Click to show or hide the answer
Headstone on Rodin's grave Click to show or hide the answer

Other Sculptors

Statue of Nelson, on top of the column in Trafalgar Square Click to show or hide the answer
The Rape of Proserpina (1621–2), Apollo and Daphne (1622–5), David (1623–4) – all in the Galleria Borghese, Rome); Ecstasy of St. Teresa (1647–52, in the Church of Santa Maria della Vittoria, Rome) Click to show or hide the answer
Mount Rushmore memorial (completed by his son Lincoln, after his death in 1941) Click to show or hide the answer
The Three Graces Click to show or hide the answer
English 'modernist' sculptor, 1924–2013: started as an assistant to Henry Moore; works often included 'found' industrial objects; described as the greatest British sculptor of his generation, and one of the greatest sculptors in the second half of the twentieth century Click to show or hide the answer
The Lobster Telephone Click to show or hide the answer
Bronze David, now in the Bargello, Florence; the first nude statue since ancient times, and the first major work of Renaissance sculpture Click to show or hide the answer
Genesis (1931), Adam (1939), Lucifer (1945); Oscar Wilde's tomb (in Pere Lachaise); St. Michael and the Devil, on the outer wall of Coventry Cathedral Click to show or hide the answer
The Little Mermaid (memorial to Hans Christian Andersen) Click to show or hide the answer
Peter Pan (Kensington Gardens) Click to show or hide the answer
Became noted in the 1960s for her horses and riders and oversized human heads Click to show or hide the answer
Swiss sculptor, 1901–66: L'homme qui marche I (The Walking Man I, 1961 – depicted on the Swiss 100 euro note) sold 2009 for £65 million – a record for a sculpture sold at auction Click to show or hide the answer
Prospero and Ariel (over the entrance to the BBC's Broadcasting House) Click to show or hide the answer
The East Wind, The West Wind
Angel of the North, Another Place Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Born Wakefield 1903, met Henry Moore at Leeds School of Art (he was a major influence on her); died in a fire at her studio in St. Ives in 1975 Click to show or hide the answer
Statues of John Betjeman on St. Pancras Station, Philip Larkin on Hull Paragon Station, and George Orwell outside BBC Broadcasting House (unveiled in 2007, 2010 and 2017 respectively) Click to show or hide the answer
Sky Mirror (Nottingham, 2001 – a larger version was installed at the Rockefeller Center in New York, in 2006); Cloud Gate (Chicago, 2006 – a highly polished steel structure, nicknamed "the Bean" because of its shape) Click to show or hide the answer
Trafalgar Square lions ("guarding" Nelson's Column) Click to show or hide the answer
Medici Tombs, Florence; statue of David (Medici Palace, Florence) Click to show or hide the answer
Reclining figure (1951 – also another of the same title, 1978/9, stolen 2005) Click to show or hide the answer
Was paid half a sixpence for his sculpture of Eleanor Rigby (a tribute to the Beatles) in Liverpool Click to show or hide the answer
Boy with a dolphin (beside the Thames in London); Guy the Gorilla (Crystal Palace); Horse and rider (Sheffield) Click to show or hide the answer

Subjects

Commemorated by a statue at St. Pancras Station, which he successfully campaigned to save in the 1960s (he died in 1984; statue erected in 2007 as part of the station's refurbishment) Click to show or hide the answer
Two "iconic Liverpool characters", represented in Tom Murphy's Chance Meeting, on Lime Street Station – unveiled in 2009 Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer
Commemorated by statues at Temple (London), Paddington station, Bristol, Saltash (Cornwall), Swindon, Milford Haven, Neyland (Pembrokeshire) – as well as at the university that's named after him! Click to show or hide the answer
English poet, subject of a statue in the gardens of the Villa Borghese, Rome – a copy of one at Trinity College, Cambridge, by the Danish sculptor Bertel Thorvaldsen Click to show or hide the answer
Equestrian statue in Whitehall (facing the site of his execution) Click to show or hide the answer
Stands on a 200–foot (60 metre) column at the lower (seaward) end of Las Ramblas, Barcelona – erected in 1888 Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
American sculptor Korczak Ziolkowski began work in 1948 on a monument to (Native American leader) Click to show or hide the answer
Twin giants depicted by statues on the Guildhall, London Click to show or hide the answer
Memorial in Old Square, Birmingham, erected 1996 Click to show or hide the answer
WWII commander – controversial statue unveiled in London, 1992 Click to show or hide the answer
Commemorated by a statue on Hull Paragon railway station, unveiled in 2010 on the 25th anniversary of his death Click to show or hide the answer
Commemorated in 2017 by a statue outside the newly extended and refurbished Broadcasting House, where he worked during World War II Click to show or hide the answer
Equestrian statue outside the House of Lords, Westminster Click to show or hide the answer
No woman has more monuments erected in her honour around the world, than Click to show or hide the answer
Commemorated by a statue outside the railway station in Huddersfield (his home town) Click to show or hide the answer

Miscellaneous

Sculpture designed by Thomas Heatherwick, erected outside the City of Manchester Stadium in 2002 to mark the Commonwealth Games; dismantled in 2009, subsequently partly sold for scrap. Name comes from a quotation by Linford Christie Click to show or hide the answer
Albert Memorial (Kensington Gore): Albert is reading Click to show or hide the answer
Subject of a statue by John Doubleday, erected in London's Leicester Square in 1981 (on the subject's 92nd birthday, and three years after his death) Click to show or hide the answer
English town, whose contribution to the development of railways is commemorated by David Mach's Train – a life–sized brick sculpture of a steam locomotive emerging from a tunnel, built in 1997 Click to show or hide the answer
Controversial piece of "public art" on an old slag heap near St. Helens, Merseyside (overlooking the M62) – by Spanish sculptor Jaume Plensa Click to show or hide the answer
Statues of Desperate Dan (from The Dandy) and Minnie the Minx (from The Beano) can be seen in (British city) Click to show or hide the answer
Statue atop the dome of the Capitol building, Washington DC Click to show or hide the answer
A statue of the cartoon character Andy Capp was erected in 2007 in (his home town, in the north of England) Click to show or hide the answer
At the junction of Rue de l'Étuve and Eikstraat, Brussels Click to show or hide the answer
English town where a large steel feather (designed to sway in the wind) was erected in 2007 to mark the centre of Sherwood Forest Click to show or hide the answer
Overlooking Volgograd (f.k.a. Stalingrad: commemorates the 1942–3 Battle of Stalingrad; declared the world's biggest statue in 1967; still the world's largest non–religious statue and the largest statue of a woman Click to show or hide the answer
Famous weathervane at Lord's Cricket Ground (donated in 1926 by Herbert Baker, the architect of the Grandstand) Click to show or hide the answer
Subject of a famous statue by George Frampton, in Kensington Gardens – commissioned in 1912 by his creator (there are six other casts around the world, including one in Sefton Park, Liverpool) Click to show or hide the answer
Michelangelo masterpiece (sculpture) in St. Peter's, Rome – attacked and damaged in 1972 by a mentally disturbed geologist (name is a standard term for a representation of the body of Jesus cradled by the Virgin Mary) Click to show or hide the answer
Giant mechanical spider (French–designed) associated with Liverpool's status as European capital of Culture 2008 Click to show or hide the answer
Term used to describe a statue of a chariot and four horses Click to show or hide the answer
Statue at Llandudno commemorating Lewis Carroll Click to show or hide the answer
Christ of Corcovado overlooks Click to show or hide the answer
Canova's The Three Graces is in the National Gallery of Click to show or hide the answer
JusticeLeft hand Click to show or hide the answer
Right hand Click to show or hide the answer
The centrepiece of London's Leicester Square, since the square's refurbishment in 1874, is a statue (by Giovanni Fontana, based on Peter Scheemakers's 1740 monument in Poets' Corner, Westminster Abbey) of Click to show or hide the answer
English town (Stan Laurel's birthplace) where a statue of Laurel & Hardy was unveiled by Ken Dodd in 2009 Click to show or hide the answer
20–metre high sculpture of a pregnant woman ("the Bump on the Beach"), loaned for 20 years to the town of Ilfracombe, Devon, in 2012, by Damien Hurst Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017–18