Monkey

Quiz Monkey
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General
Dogs

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Crufts
Breeds
Real Life Dogs
The Queen's dogs
Fictional Dogs
Other

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Dogs

Claws of a dog Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Dog licences introduced in the UK (as a tax to raise money for the Royal Navy) Click to show or hide the answer
Dog licences abolished in the UK Click to show or hide the answer
Cost of a dog licence when abolished Click to show or hide the answer
Cost of a dog licence in old money Click to show or hide the answer
UK quarantine period Click to show or hide the answer

Crufts

Charles Cruft held his first dog show (in the UK – taking up management of the Allied Terrier Club Show, at the Royal Aquarium in Westminster) in Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Crufts was first held under that name (at the Royal Agricultural Hall, Islington) and first allowed all breeds, in Click to show or hide the answer

Subsequent venues 1948–78 Click to show or hide the answer
1979–90 Click to show or hide the answer
Since 1991 Click to show or hide the answer
Prize for Best in Show at Crufts (as well as a replica of the Keddall Memorial Trophy) Click to show or hide the answer

Breeds

Largest breed of terrier (wiry black & tan coat) Click to show or hide the answer
Said to have been introduced to America by Helen Keller, who was touched by the story of Hachiko – the Japanese equivalent of Greyfriars Bobby – which died in 1935 (hers were called Kamikaze–go and Kenzan–go) Click to show or hide the answer
Can't bark (originates in Africa, name comes from Bantu) Click to show or hide the answer
First bred in France from the French bloodhound and the St. Hubert hound Click to show or hide the answer
Terrier named after a former mining town in Northumberland, where it was first bred to hunt vermin in the mines – noted for its similarity to a lamb in appearance Click to show or hide the answer
Also known as the Russian wolfhound Click to show or hide the answer
The smallest of all breeds of dog – named after a Mexican state Click to show or hide the answer
Famous (in quizzes!) for its blue/black/purple tongue Click to show or hide the answer
Best of Show a record seven times (up to 2016) at Crufts Click to show or hide the answer
The Kelpie (Australia) is a kind of; rough, bearded, smooth and border are also breeds of Click to show or hide the answer
Pembroke and Cardigan are the two recognised breeds of; believed to have been bred to control cattle, although there is very little evidence for this; name (of Welsh origin) may mean "dwarf dog" or "watchdog" Click to show or hide the answer
Originally bred for hunting badgers – name is German for "badger dog" Click to show or hide the answer
Named after a character in Walter Scott's Guy Mannering Click to show or hide the answer
Named after the German tax collector who bred it Click to show or hide the answer
The world's tallest dog (Guinness 2002); also known as the German mastiff Click to show or hide the answer
Traditionally the tallest breed Click to show or hide the answer
Named after a Devon clergyman (an enthusiastic hunter and dog breeder, 1795–1883) Click to show or hide the answer
The most popular breed to keep as pets in the UK, USA, Australia and New Zealand Click to show or hide the answer
Cross between a sighthound and a pastoral dog (e.g. a greyhound and a collie) Click to show or hide the answer
Black & Tan terrier Click to show or hide the answer
The Landseer (named after the painter) is a variety of (with white markings on the body) Click to show or hide the answer
Breed standard defined in Bulawayo, 1922 Click to show or hide the answer
Thought to have originated in Tibet and been developed in China; name means "lion dog"; nicknamed the chrysanthemum dog Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Greyfriars Bobby Click to show or hide the answer
Kind of dog, thought to have originated in Spain; name derived from the Spanish or French word for a Spaniard Click to show or hide the answer
More familiar name for the Alpine Mastiff Click to show or hide the answer
Breed of hunting dog: established in the 17th century, but now extinct; named after the 1st Earl of Shrewsbury (appears on the family crest) Click to show or hide the answer

Real Life Dogs

George W. Bush's Scottie – bit a Reuters reporter on the finger, November 2008 (3 days after Obama was elected to succeed Bush). (See also Miss Beazley) Click to show or hide the answer
Adolf Hitler's German Shepherd – given to him in 1941 by Martin Boorman Click to show or hide the answer
The Obamas' Portuguese water dogs Acquired in 2009 (just after he took office) Click to show or hide the answer
Acquired in 2012 or 2013 Click to show or hide the answer

Lord Byron's dog (buried at his family home, Newstead Abbey) Click to show or hide the answer
Bill Clinton's dog (and cat) Click to show or hide the answer
Roy Rogers's dog Click to show or hide the answer
Roy Hatttersley's dog, whose 'diaries' ("as told to Roy Hattersley") were published in 1998 Click to show or hide the answer
Rick Stein's Jack Russell (died 2007 aged 17) Click to show or hide the answer
The first Dulux dog Click to show or hide the answer
Isaac Newton's dog – destroyed years of experimental results by upsetting a candle Click to show or hide the answer
Princess Anne's English bull terrier, which attacked two schoolboys in Windsor Great Park in 2002 (escaped punishment after Anne agreed to a retraining programme); originally blamed for Florence's attack on the Queen's corgi Pharos Click to show or hide the answer
F. D. Roosevelt's Scottie Click to show or hide the answer
Princess Anne's other English bull terrier (see Dotty), that savaged one of the Queen's corgis (Pharos) at Christmas 2003 – resulting in the corgi having to be put down; bit a maid on the leg five days later (escaped punishment after Anne agreed to a retraining programme) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Elizabeth Barratt Browning's cocker spaniel Click to show or hide the answer
2000: the first pet (dog) allowed into Britain on a pet passport Click to show or hide the answer
Llewellyn's wolfhound (according to legend – there is no historical evidence) – said to be buried at the Snowdonia village of Beddgelert Click to show or hide the answer
Skye terrier that watched over his master's grave in Edinburgh for 14 years; commemorated by a statue in Greyfriars Kirkyard and a monument on the corner of Candlemakers Row and King George IV Bridge Click to show or hide the answer
Original (bulldog) mascot of Yale University Click to show or hide the answer
The first living creature (from Earth!) in space (on Sputnik 2) Click to show or hide the answer
George W. Bush's other Scottie (see Barney) Click to show or hide the answer
Guy Gibson's dog Click to show or hide the answer
The dog in the HMV logo Click to show or hide the answer
G. K. Chesterton's dog Click to show or hide the answer
Dog (i.e. not a bitch!) that played Lassie in Lassie Come Home (1943) and six subsequent films; Lassie has been played ever since by his descendants – all dogs (dogs retain a thicker coat in summer, which is felt to look better) Click to show or hide the answer
Found the World Cup in 1966; strangled himself on his own lead while chasing a cat in 1967 Click to show or hide the answer
Rescued from the trenches of a World War I battlefield Click to show or hide the answer
St. Bernard that replaced brother Mike as Bernie Winters's comedy partner Click to show or hide the answer
Thomas Hardy's wire–haired terrier Click to show or hide the answer

The Queen's Corgis (and her other dogs)

Queen Elizabeth II is said to be very careful to keep her private and public lives separate. Apart from her actual family however, the one thing that everyone surely knows about her private life is her love of corgis.

The story goes that the princesses Elizabeth and Margaret, as very young children,  fell in love with the corgis owned by the Marquess of Bath's children. The rest, as they say, is history.

The Queen is said to have owned over 30 corgis, all bred from Susan (see below).

Bought in 1933 by the Duke of York (later King George VI) for Princesses Elizabeth and Margaret (died c. 1939) Click to show or hide the answer
The second corgi bought by the Duke of York for his family – accidentally run over in Windsor Great Park Click to show or hide the answer
Jane's offspring Click to show or hide the answer
Given to Princess Elizabeth on her 18th birthday (1944), to replace Jane: accompanied Princess Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh on their honeymoon in Scotland; the common ancestor of all the Queen's corgis; died in 1959 Click to show or hide the answer
Susan's offspring Click to show or hide the answer
Sugar's offspring Click to show or hide the answer
Put down in 2003 after being savaged by Princess Anne's dog Dottie (a.k.a. Florence) Click to show or hide the answer
"Photo–bombed" the photo of the Queen with England's rugby World Cup winning squad in 2003 Click to show or hide the answer

Other corgis whose names I've managed to discover (my main source being an article published by Vanity Fair in July 2015) are, in roughly chronological order:

Carol, Bee, Smoky, Jet, Spark, Phoenix, Pundit, Mint, Fay; Ranger, Beau, Lark, Gambol, Dash (1984, dam Spark) Dagger, Rush, Disco (1984, dam Dash); Minnie, Flora, Swift, Quiz, Linnet, Emma, Heather; Kelpie, Legend, Puck, Phantom (2003, dam Myth); Holly, Willow, Bramble, Laurel, Jasmine, Cedar, Rose, Larch (2003, dam Linnet)

Rush, Minnie and Monty belonged to the Queen Mother, and were taken in by the Queen after her mother's death.

Appeared in the opening ceremony for the 2012 London Olympics (when Daniel Craig as James Bond visited Buckingham Palace, allegedly to escort the Queen to the stadium) Click to show or hide the answer

Monty died in September 2012, leaving Holly and Willow as the Queen's last surviving corgis. It is often reported (but has never, as far as I can establish, been officially confirmed) that the Queen has decided not to have any more dogs after Holly and Willow because she doesn't want to leave them behind when she passes away.

The Queen has also owned cocker spaniels, black labradors and dorgis (cross–breeds resulting from an unplanned liaison between a corgi and Princess Margaret's dachshund Pipkin). She is said to name them all herself. The spaniels and labradors are bred at Sandringham, the corgis at Windsor; their names are often prefixed by the names of the kennels (i.e. Windsor or Sandringham, as appropriate).

Click to show or hide the answer Bisto, Oxo, Flash, Spick, Span, Fern (1979–91)
Click to show or hide the answer Slipper, Brae, Gryffindor
Click to show or hide the answer Cider, Berry, Vulcan, Candy

Apart from Monty (who died at Balmoral and is buried there), the queen's dogs are traditionally buried at Sandringham, where they have individual memorial stones. There is also one commemorating the death in 1958 of the yellow labrador Candy – "for 6 years the faithful companion of ... [the] Duke of Edinburgh".

Fictional Dogs

Odysseus's dog (in Homer) Click to show or hide the answer
Bill Sikes's dog (Oliver Twist) Click to show or hide the answer
Rabid St. Bernard in a Stephen King novel (and the film based on it) Click to show or hide the answer
Comic–strip dog in the Blondie films Click to show or hide the answer
Obelix's pet dog, in the Asterix cartoons (Obelix is Asterix's best friend) Click to show or hide the answer
Dennis the Menace's dog Click to show or hide the answer
Dog that appeared alongside Clement Freud in the Minced Morsels adverts (fictional because he was actually played by a number of different dogs) Click to show or hide the answer
Dora's dog (David Copperfield) Click to show or hide the answer
William (Brown)'s dog (Just William, etc. – Richmal Crompton) Click to show or hide the answer
Superman's pet dog Click to show or hide the answer
The dog in Three men in a boat Click to show or hide the answer
Sexton Blake's faithful bloodhound Click to show or hide the answer
The dog in The Muppet Show Click to show or hide the answer
The Simpsons' greyhound Click to show or hide the answer
The dog in the Secret Seven Click to show or hide the answer
Tintin's dog Click to show or hide the answer
The dog in the Famous Five Click to show or hide the answer
Punch & Judy's dog Click to show or hide the answer
Dorothy's dog (The Wizard of Oz) Click to show or hide the answer
Mrs. Pumphrey's pampered pooch in James Herriot's stories Click to show or hide the answer

Other

From 2016, to comply with the Government's plan to reduce the number of strays, UK dog owners must Click to show or hide the answer
Ruby, Teddy, Offa, Lucy, Sadie, Cosby Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Chinese crested: unusual characteristic Click to show or hide the answer
Type of dog that includes the akita, chow chow, corgi, husky, malamute, Norwegian elkhound, Pomeranian and samoyed Click to show or hide the answer
Lhasa Apso: originated in Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017