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Places in History: Rest of the World

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Places in History: Rest of the World

This page is about places that have historical significance for one reason or another.  It may be a place where some significant event occurred (e.g. the Bay of Pigs), or it may have had a significance at some point or period in history that it no longer has (e.g. Calais), or it may simply be somewhere that's of interest for historical reasons (e.g. France's Tomb of the Unknown Warrior).

See also Places in History: United Kingdom.

City in northern Pakistan, where Osama Bin Laden lived from 2005 and where he was killed by US forces in 2011; his house was destroyed by Pakistani authorities in 2012. Also home to the Pakistan Military Academy Click to show or hide the answer
Region of Georgia, declared independence in 1991 along with South Ossetia, over which Russia (recognising it as an independent state) fought a war in 2008 with Georgia, which considers it to be a Russian–occupied territory Click to show or hide the answer
Abandoned Roman Catholic mission in San Antonio, Texas, where approximately 200 Texian defenders including Davy Crockett, Jim Bowie and commanded by Lt. Col. William B. Travis, died during an assault by Mexican troops under President General Antonio López de Santa Anna, following a 13–day siege, on 6 March 1836 Click to show or hide the answer
Sarah Palin's home state: she was its 9th governor, from 2006 to 2009 Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Suffered an earthquake of magnitude 9.2 (on the Richter scale) in 1964, devastating one of its largest cities Click for more information
The Évian Accords (1962) led ultimately to the independence of Click to show or hide the answer
Cave in Cantabria, Spain (near Santander), famous for its Palaeolithic paintings (discovered in 1879) Click to show or hide the answer
France's Tomb of the Unknown Warrior is underneath the Click to show or hide the answer
Volcanic island in the South Atlantic, 800 miles north–west of St. Helena: claimed by Britain in 1815; used as an air base during World War II, and as a staging post during the Falklands conflict (1982) Click to show or hide the answer
Prison in New York state where 39 people were killed in a riot in 1971 Click to show or hide the answer
Seat of the Republican government during the Spanish Civil War Click to show or hide the answer
1,500 US–sponsored Cuban exiles made a bungled attempt to invade Cuba, in 1961, at Click to show or hide the answer
Terry Waite, special envoy of Archbishop of Canterbury Robert Runcie, was held captive from 1987 to 1991 in (Middle Eastern city) Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's oldest colony Click to show or hide the answer
Indian city where a leak of methyl isocyanate gas at Union Carbide's pesticide factory in 1984 caused an estimated 3,800 deaths Click to show or hide the answer
The Great Molasses Flood of 1919, when a storage tank containing 2.3 million gallons of molasses burst, resulting in 21 deaths and over 150 people injured, took place in (US city) Click to show or hide the answer
Intended site of the first British penal colony in Australia – where Captain Cook had landed in HMS Endeavour 18 years earlier, in 1770; originally known as Stingray Harbour (Captain Arthur Phillip moved the colony to Sydney Cove, Port Jackson – Sydney Harbour – five days after landing, due to concerns over the lack of fresh water and the risk of disease posed by the swampy land) Click to show or hide the answer
Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton remarried, in 1975, in (country) Click to show or hide the answer
Town in New Hampshire, where a conference was held in 1944 to discuss post–war international payments; led to the foundation of the IBRD and the IMF Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's last possession in France, lost during the reign of Mary Tudor Click to show or hide the answer
Capital of British India until 1911 Click to show or hide the answer
More familiar name for Naval Support Facility Thurmont, Maryland – also once known as Shangri–La Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Anwar Sadat and Menachim Begin shared the 1978 Nobel Peace Prize after signing a peace agreement at (US location)
City on the southern shore of the Straits of Gibraltar: captured by Portugal in 1415, and ceded to Spain in 1668; remains part of Spain today Click to show or hide the answer
Name (in English) of the most famous crossing–point in the Berlin Wall – the best–known symbol of the Cold War – located at the junction of Friedrichstrasse, Mauerstrasse and Zimmerstrasse Click to show or hide the answer
Nuclear power plant near Pripyat, Ukraine: scene of a catastrophic nuclear accident in 1986, that occurred during a late–night safety test Click to show or hide the answer
US city that beat New York, Washington DC and St. Louis in the competition to hold the World's Columbian Exposition (a.k.a. World's Fair), held in 1893 to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Columbus's discovery of America Click to show or hide the answer
Forest in Picardy, northern France, where the Armistice of 11 November 1918 to end World War I and the French surrender to the Nazis on 22 June 1940 were both signed (at a place now known as the Glade of the Armistice) Click to show or hide the answer
The Minoan civilisation, flourishing from about 2600 to 1100 BC, was chiefly based on (Mediterranean island) Click to show or hide the answer
Territory annexed from Ukraine by Russia in 2014 Click to show or hide the answer
Early passage through the Appalachian mountains – named after an English county, gave Lonnie Donegan the title of his first UK No. 1 hit single! Click to show or hide the answer
Part of the Ottoman Empire from 1571; placed under British protection in 1878, and formally annexed by Britain in 1914; declared a British colony in 1925, gained independence in 1960 Click to show or hide the answer
Proclaimed as an independent state in 1983 but still not internationally recognised; became in 2014 the last place in Europe to legalise sex between men Click to show or hide the answer
Named in the Old Testament, and still exists – said to be the world's oldest continuously–inhabited city Click to show or hide the answer
Region of western Sudan, centre of a bitter conflict from 2003 (said by some to be between Arab and African populations) Click to show or hide the answer
BP oil rig that caused a major spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 Click to show or hide the answer
The Treaty of Kiel (1814) transferred the Kingdom of Norway to Sweden, from Click to show or hide the answer
Republic of Ragusa: founded in 1358, reached its commercial peak in the 15th and 16th centuries, and was incorporated into the Kingdom of Italy by Napoleon in 1808; centred in (city on the Dalmatian coast, now in Croatia) Click to show or hide the answer
US Air Force base near Los Angeles, used for Chuck Yeager's first supersonic flight and for early Space Shuttle landings (also later as a bad weather backup) Click to show or hide the answer
Italian island to which Napoleon was exiled in May 1814 (following the Treaty of Fontainbleu, which ended his reign as Emperor of France); he escaped in February 1815, returning to France for the so–called 'Hundred Days' Click to show or hide the answer
Atoll in the Marshall Islands (central Pacific Ocean) where the first hydrogen bomb was detonated in 1952 Click to show or hide the answer
Airport serving Kampala (Uganda), where Israeli troops rescued passengers from a hi–jacked Air France plane in 1976 Click to show or hide the answer
Name given to the site, near Calais, of a summit in 1520 between Henry VIII of England and Francis I of France Click to show or hide the answer
The Mannerheim Line was built in the 1920s and 1930s (in two stages) as a defence against invasion from the Soviet Union, by Click to show or hide the answer
Ceded to the USA by Spain under the terms of the Adams–Onis Treaty (1819) Click to show or hide the answer
The first modern state to be recognised by the Catholic Church; known as the 'Eldest Daughter of the Church'; its king was styled 'the Most Christian King' from around 1400 Click to show or hide the answer
The only remaining European possession on the South American mainland (an overseas département of France) Click to show or hide the answer
Japanese nuclear power station damaged following the tsunami of March 2011 Click to show or hide the answer
Poland's principal seaport, on the Baltic coast, where the trade union Solidarność (Solidarity) emerged in 1980 Click to show or hide the answer
The so–called 'Rose Revolution' of 2003 marked the end of Soviet era leadership in Click to show or hide the answer
Ceded to Britain under the terms of the Treaty of Utrecht (1713), and remains under British control today Click to show or hide the answer
John Lennon and Yoko Ono married in 1969, in
Three Provisional IRA members (Sean Savage, Daniel McCann, Mairéad Farrell) were shot dead by undercover British SAS agents, in 1988 – as featured in a controversial ITV This Week documentary – in
Farm near Oslo, gave its name to a ship burial found there and excavated in 1880 Click to show or hide the answer
Range of hills, previously under Syrian control, occupied by Israel since 1967 Click to show or hide the answer
The Moors' last stronghold in Spain (finally falling in 1492) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Caribbean island invaded by US forces in 1983 following the execution of opposition leader Maurice Bishop Click to show or hide the answer
Place in New Jersey, famous as the site of the Martian landings in Orson Welles's War of the Worlds (1938) Click to show or hide the answer
Camp Delta, Camp Echo, Camp Iguana, Camp X–Ray (Cuba): collectively Click to show or hide the answer
San Francisco district, epicentre of the Beat and Hippie cultures of the 1950s and 60s – named after two streets that meet there Click to show or hide the answer
Discovered and named the Sandwich Islands by Captain Cook, 1778 Click to show or hide the answer
Region of Saudi Arabia that includes Mecca and Medina: declared independent (from the Ottoman Empire) in 1916, was a founder member of the League of Nations before being incorporated into Saudi Arabia Click to show or hide the answer
Destroyed by Vesuvius in 79 AD, along with Pompeii Click to show or hide the answer
Belgium's national stadium (Brussels), where 39 Juventus fans died as a result of disturbances with Liverpool fans before the 1985 European Cup Final (since renamed the King Baudouin Stadium) Click to show or hide the answer
Farm in Namibia that gave its name to the largest known meteorite, discovered there in 1920 (thought to have landed some time in the last 80,000 years, it's still there) Click to show or hide the answer
Became a British colony after the First Opium War (1839–42); transferred to China in 1997, on the expiry of a 150–year lease agreed in 1847 and under the terms of a joint Sino–British declaration made in 1984, becoming China's first provincial–level special administrative region. In 2014 there was a protracted protest against electoral constraints, known as the Umbrella Revolution Click to show or hide the answer
Castle where the Defenestration of Prague took place in 1618 Click to show or hide the answer
Ruled by Norway, 1262–1397; came under Danish rule in 1523, after Sweden's secession from the Kalmar Union; achieved independence in 1918; voted in a 1944 referendum to sever its remaining ties with the Danish monarchy and become a republic Click to show or hide the answer
Building in Philadelphia in which the Liberty Bell was housed until 1976 (moved in anticipation of the Bicentennial celebrations – now housed in a specially–built pavilion nearby) Click to show or hide the answer
The first permanent British settlement in America (visited by the Queen in 2007 to mark its 400th anniversary) Click to show or hide the answer
In 1992, US President George H. W. Bush vomited at a banquet held by the Prime Minister of (country) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Treetops Hotel (in Aberdare National Park), where Princess Elizabeth was staying at the time her father (George VI) died, is in (country) Click to show or hide the answer
Capital of the Abruzzo region (Italy): prone to earthquakes, notably in April 2009 Click to show or hide the answer
Cave complex in south–western France, famous for its prehistoric paintings – discovered in 1940 by four teenage boys Click to show or hide the answer
City near the southern tip of Cyprus, associated with the events of the Crusades and the marriage of Richard I to Berengaria in 1191 Click to show or hide the answer
Monument in Washington DC from whose steps Martin Luther King made his "I have a dream" speech (1963) Click to show or hide the answer
Destroyed by an earthquake 1755 Click to show or hide the answer
Riots in 1992 followed the acquittal of four police officers on charges of assaulting Rodney King (an African–American taxi driver) in 1991. All occurred in Click to show or hide the answer
French name for the territory sold by Napoleon to the USA in 1803 for 60 million francs ($11.25 million) – covering 0.83 million square miles of the mid–west, from New Orleans to the Canadian border – about 23% of the current area of the USA. (Including interest and cancellation of debts, the USA eventually paid $23.2m in total) Click to show or hide the answer
Town in the foothills of the French Pyrenees, a place of Catholic pilgrimage since 1858 when Bernadette Soubirous (St. Bernadette) saw a vision of the Virgin Mary Click to show or hide the answer
Subject of a dispute in 1867 between France and Prussia (the ... Crisis), which was resolved by the Treaty of London, requiring the dismantling of its formidable fortifications (which took 16 years) Click to show or hide the answer
Dutch town where the Treaty on European Union was signed in 1992 (drafted in 1991, came into force in November 1993; changed the European Community to the European Union, and led to the creation of the euro) Click to show or hide the answer
Gives its name to a geological formation where important fossil remains were discovered in 1764 Click for more information
The Gunpowder Plot was hatched at
Hit by four bomb blasts on commuter trains, 2004 Click to show or hide the answer
Under Spanish rule from 1282; given to the Knights Hospitaller in 1530 by Holy Roman Emperor Charles V; invaded by Napoleon in 1798; ceded to Britain in 1814 by the Treaty of Paris; awarded the George Cross in 1942; gained independence in 1964, and became a republic in 1974 Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
US state that provided the land on which Washington and the District of Columbia were built Click to show or hide the answer
Fortress overlooking the Dead Sea, where 953 Hebrews made a final stand against the Romans in 73AD, and committed suicide rather than be captured and enslaved Click to show or hide the answer
Hunting lodge where Crown Prince Rudolf of Austria and his lover Baroness Mary Vetsera were found dead in 1889 Click to show or hide the answer
De facto capital of Australia, 1901–27 (interim seat of the parliament and government, before they moved to Canberra) Click to show or hide the answer
58 new–born babies were rescued seven days after an earthquake in 1985, in Click to show or hide the answer
The Battle of the Little Bighorn took place (in 1876) in what is now (US state) Click to show or hide the answer
Archipelago that includes Trimouille Island, where the first British nuclear weapons test was carried out in 1952 Click to show or hide the answer
US city: scene of a bus boycott in 1955, led by Martin Luther King Click to show or hide the answer
Headquarters of Hitler's Nazi movement in the 1920s Click to show or hide the answer
Name given by Francis Drake to the area on the Pacific coast of North America (probably northern California) where he landed in 1579 Click to show or hide the answer
Name given to Australia in 1644 by Abel Tasman (New South Wales was named after British settlement in 1788, but this name continued in popular usage to refer to the entire continent until the 1850s) Click to show or hide the answer
Region of southern Egypt and northern Sudan – named after its people – formerly a number of independent kingdoms, the last of which collapsed in 1504 Click to show or hide the answer
The post–war Nazi war trials of 1945–6 were held in (German city) Click to show or hide the answer
Capital of the kingdom of Navarre – famous nowadays for the festival that takes place there in July each year (the Running of the Bulls) Click to show or hide the answer
Acquired 'in perpetuity' by the USA in 1903; passed to the country of origin in 1979, but controlled by the USA from 1990 to 1999 under the terms of the 1977 treaty (50 miles by 10) Click to show or hide the answer
Hosted the 1900 World Exhibition Click to show or hide the answer
Interpol was reconstituted after WWII in
State of mediaeval Russia, on the western slopes of the Urals (absorbed into Russia in 1505): gave its name to the last geological period of the Paleozoic era Click to show or hide the answer
De facto capital of the USA before Washington (until 1800): venue of the First and Second Continental Congresses, 1774 and 1775–6, and of the adoption of the US Constitution (later ratified by individual states) on 17 Sep 1787 Click to show or hide the answer
Legionnaire's disease first appeared in 1976, at an ex–servicemen's conference in
Live Aid was staged, on 13 July 1985, in London and
Traditional site (not definitively authenticated) where the Pilgrim Fathers stepped ashore in 1620, on the coast of what was to become Massachusetts Click to show or hide the answer
The world's oldest alliance that's still in force – dating to a treaty of 1373, which was ratified by the Treaty of Windsor (1386) – is between England (now the United Kingdom) and Click to show or hide the answer
Inlet of the Gulf of Alaska (on the south coast of Alaska), site of a major environmental disaster in 1989 when the oil tanker Exxon Valdez ran aground on Bligh Reef Click to show or hide the answer
Area of high ground where the "golden spike" was driven in 1869 to mark the meeting of the Union Pacific and Central Pacific, completing the first US Transcontinental Railroad Click to show or hide the answer
City in which French Kings were traditionally crowned Click to show or hide the answer
The first Earth Summit (1992) was held in Click to show or hide the answer
Town in New Mexico: gave its name to an incident in 1947, believed by conspiracy theorists to have involved the crash–landing of one or more alien spaceraft Click to show or hide the answer
Joan of Arc was imprisoned and burnt (1431) in Click to show or hide the answer
Town where the French Red Cross opened a camp in 1999 to house refugees intending to use the Channel Tunnel to seek asylum in Britain – closed 2002 Click to show or hide the answer
South African township where 69 people were killed and 178 wounded in 1960 when police fired on a demonstration against the pass laws Click to show or hide the answer
Birthplace of Muammar Gaddafi (1942); his final stronghold in the civil war of 2011, and the place where he was killed by rebel forces; largely destroyed in the associated fighting Click to show or hide the answer
Mahatma Gandhi practised law from 1893 to 1914, in Click to show or hide the answer
First US state to secede from the Union, leading to the Civil War (1860) Click to show or hide the answer
Region of Georgia, declared independence in 1991, over which Russia (recognising it as an independent state) fought a war in 2008 with Georgia, which considers it to be a Russian–occupied territory; see also Abkhazia. (Note: North Ossetia lies on the other side of the Caucasus mountains and is undisputedly part of Russia) Click to show or hide the answer
South African township (Johannesburg) where police opened fire on a protest march (over the government's policy to enforce education in Afrikaans rather than English) on 16 June 1976, killing 23 people; name is short for South West Township Click to show or hide the answer
Prison where Nazi war criminals were held until August 1987, when Rudolf Hess hanged himself there – after which it was demolished Click to show or hide the answer
Bosnian town where over 8,000 Muslims were massacred by units of the Bosnian Serb Army under the command of General Ratko Mladić, in July 1995 Click to show or hide the answer
Volcanic island in the South Atlantic: under British control since the days of Francis Drake, governed by the British East India Company from 1658 to 1802; Napoleon died in exile there in 1821; Zulu king Dinuzulu kaCetshwayo (son of Cetewayo) was exiled there from 1890 to 1897, as were more than 5,000 Boers taken prisoner during the second Boer War (1899–1902) Click to show or hide the answer
Founded by Peter the Great, 1703; capital of Russia, 1713–28 and 1732–1918 (before Moscow) Click to show or hide the answer
German name for the areas along the borders of Czechoslovakia that were populated by German speakers – occupied by Germany in October 1938 as sanctioned in the infamous Munich Agreement (of September 1938) Click to show or hide the answer
Square in Cairo, focal point of the 2011 popular uprising against president Hosni Mubarak – name means Liberation Square – so named after the 1919 revolution, but only officially after the 1952 revolution which established the republic Click to show or hide the answer
The world's worst aviation disaster: 583 people died when two aircraft collided on the ground, in 1977; took place on (largest of the Canary Islands) Click to show or hide the answer
Last of the 11 southern US States to secede from the Union, on the outbreak of the Civil War (1861) Click to show or hide the answer
Island in the Susquehannah River, hear Harrisburg, Pennsylvania: scene of the West's worst ever nuclear accident, in 1979, when radioactive steam was released following the failure of a water pump at a nuclear power station Click to show or hide the answer
Peking Square – the world's largest public square, name means 'square of Heavenly Peace' – where 1,000 unarmed protesters were massacred by troops in 1989 Click to show or hide the answer
Name given to the part of the British Mandate of Palestine that was east of the Jordan River – gained independence in 1946, renamed the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan in 1950 after it annexed the West Bank Click to show or hide the answer
Hotel in Aberdare National Park, Kenya, where Princess Elizabeth became Queen Click to show or hide the answer
The world's most remote inhabited island (in the South Atlantic, 1,300 miles from St. Helena); its entire population was evacuated to the UK in 1961 after a volcanic eruption – most families returned in 1963 Click to show or hide the answer
River that gave its name to an event that occurred in Siberia in 1908 – possibly the "air burst" of a meteoroid or comet, about 5 miles above the earth's surface Click to show or hide the answer
Capital of the Kingdom of Sardinia from 1720, and the first capital of the united Italy from 1861 to 1865 Click to show or hide the answer
Town on the shores of Lake Tanganyika (now in Tanzania) where Henry Morton Stanley met Dr. David Livingstone in 1871 Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
The Orange Revolution was a series of protests and political events that took place from November 2004 to January 2005, in (country) Click to show or hide the answer
Union formed by Egypt and Syria in 1958 (dissolved in 1961) Click to show or hide the answer
Island owned by the Workers' Youth League, the youth wing of the Norwegian Labour Party, and venue of an annual summer camp – where Anders Breivik shot 69 people including 55 teenagers in July 2011 Click to show or hide the answer
Pennsylvania headquarters of the US Continental Army, 1777–8 (during the Revolutionary War) – now a National Historical Park Click to show or hide the answer
US college where a deranged gunman murdered 33 students including himself, 2007 Click to show or hide the answer
Texas town where 76 members of the Branch Davidian sect were killed in 1993 when the FBI launched an attack on the Mount Carmel Centre, following a 50–day siege that started when government agents were prevented from executing a search warrant to investigate allegations of illegal weapons Click to show or hide the answer
Originally formed the northern boundary of the New Amsterdam settlement Click to show or hide the answer
Disputed territory on the North West coast of Africa, relinquished by Spain in 1976 and since occupied largely by Morocco Click to show or hide the answer
German town, on the River Elbe, where the Protestant Reformation has been said to have begun in 1517 when Martin Luther nailed his '95 Theses' (against the sale of indulgences) to the door of All Saints' Church Click to show or hide the answer
German city, gave its name to the edict of 1521, which declared Martin Luther a heretic and an outlaw Click to show or hide the answer
Tsar Nicholas III and family were murdered in 1918 at (city known from 1918 to 1991 as Sverdlovsk) Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017–18