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Sport
Motor Racing

On this page:

General
Grands Prix
British Grand Prix
Australian Grand Prix
Circuits
Drivers
British Formula 1 world champions
Teams (cars)
Non-Formula 1
Motor Cycling

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Motor Racing

On this page, everything as far as the Non–Formula 1 heading refers to Formula 1.

For details of the world land and water speed records, see Cars and Driving in Travel.

General

Black flag means Click to show or hide the answer
Red flag means Click to show or hide the answer
Yellow flag (warning only) means Click to show or hide the answer
Blue flag means Click to show or hide the answer

Formula 1 Grand Prix Championship: points for a win (prior to 2010) Click to show or hide the answer
From 2006 to 2013, the maximum engine capacity for Formula One cars (previously 3 litres) was Click to show or hide the answer
The maximum F1 engine capacity was reduced again in 2014, from 2.4 litres to Click to show or hide the answer
Senior official at a motor racing meeting (as in horse racing) Click to show or hide the answer
The safety car for F1 has been provided since 1996 by (manufacturer) Click to show or hide the answer

The three races that make up motor racing's 'Triple Crown' are:

Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

Grands Prix

The first Grand Prix (Le Mans) Click to show or hide the answer
The first British Grand Prix Click to show or hide the answer

British Grands Prix were held at Brooklands in 1926 and 1927. The next was at Silverstone in 1948.

The first Grand Prix championship Click to show or hide the answer
Number of races in the 1950 season Click to show or hide the answer

The seven races in the 1950 season were the Grands Prix of (in chronological order) Britain, Monaco, Switzerland, Belgium, France and Italy, and the Indianapolis 500, which was the third race of the season (after Monaco and before Switzerland).

Number of races (2012 season – previous maximum was 19) Click to show or hide the answer
The first race of the season, every year since 1996, except 2006 and 2010 (previously, 1985 to 1995, the last of the season) Click to show or hide the answer
First race of the season in 2006 and 2010 Click to show or hide the answer
Held every year since 1950 Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer
Held every year from 1950 to 2008, except 1955 Click to show or hide the answer
Hosted three Grands Prix, 2011–13 – Sebastian Vettel won all three Click to show or hide the answer
Returned to the tour in 2015 after a gap of 23 years (first held in 1962, and as a championship event from 1963–70 and 1986–92) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Held in 1950, and every year since 1955; the shortest race on the circuit (260.52 km) and the only one that's less than the stipulated 305 km Click to show or hide the answer
The only African country, apart from South Africa, to host a Grand Prix (1958) Click to show or hide the answer
Hosted its first Grand Prix for exactly 100 years, in 2014 (the only previous ones were in 1913 and 1914) Click to show or hide the answer

Points, since 2010

1st2nd3rd 4th5th6th 7th8th9th 10th
Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

Latest additions to the circuit

First held in 1999 Click to show or hide the answer
First held in 2004 Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer
First held in 2005 Click to show or hide the answer
First held in 2008; the first to be held at night (starts 20:00 local time, 12:00 GMT) Click to show or hide the answer
First held in 2009 Click to show or hide the answer
First held in 2010 Click to show or hide the answer
First held in 2011 Click to show or hide the answer

The Bahrain Grand Prix of 2011 was cancelled due to political unrest.

British Grand Prix

The first and second British Grands Prix (1926 and 1927) were held at Click to show or hide the answer
1928–47 Click to show or hide the answer

Grands Prix were held at Donington Park in 1935, 1937 and 1938, but they were known as the Donington Grand Prix and not the British Grand Prix.

1948–54, even years until 1960, odd years 1963–87, every year since 1987 Click to show or hide the answer
Odd years 1955–61, and 1962 Click to show or hide the answer
Even years 1964–86 Click to show or hide the answer

Australian Grand Prix

Location of the first Australian Grands Prix (1928–35) – off Melbourne, and named after the founder of the city Click to show or hide the answer
Melbourne park that has hosted the Australian Grand Prix since 1996; previously used in 1953 and 1956 Click to show or hide the answer
From 1985–95, the Australian Grand Prix was held around the streets of Click to show or hide the answer

The Australian Grand Prix didn't count towards the F1 world championship until 1985.

Circuits

Venue for the British Grand Prix, in odd–numbered years from 1955 to 1961, and also in 1962 Click to show or hide the answer
Made its Grand Prix debut in 2016, hosting the European Grand Prix (in the capital city of Azerbaijan) Click to show or hide the answer
Venue for the British Grand Prix, in even–numbered years 1964–86 Click to show or hide the answer
Near Weybridge, Surrey: opened in 1907 as the world's first purpose–built motor racing circuit; also one of Britain's first airfields, becoming Britain's largest aircraft manufacturing centre by 1918; venue for the first two British Grands Prix (1926 and 1927); hosted its last race in 1939; now a museum Click to show or hide the answer
Portuguese Grand Prix, 1984–96 (not held since) Click to show or hide the answer
Venue of the Japanese Grand Prix, 1966–77 (except 1970 and 1974 when it wasn't held), also 2007 and 2008 Click to show or hide the answer
Canadian Grand Prix, since 1978 (previously Circuit Ile Notre Dame – renamed 1982 after …) Click to show or hide the answer
90 mph crash that ended Stirling Moss's career (1962) Click to show or hide the answer
Home of the German Grand Prix, 1970 and every year since 1977 (except 1985); Jim Clark died there in a Formula 2 race in 1967 Click to show or hide the answer
Venue of the Italian Grand Prix 1980, and of every San Marino Grand Prix (1981–2006); Ayrton Senna and Roland Ratzenburger died there (in the race and in practice, respectively) in 1994 Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Track in Rio de Janeiro, home of the Brazilian Grand Prix since its inception in 1972, except in 1978 and 1981–9 – officially known since the 1970s as the Autodromo José Carlos Pace Click to show or hide the answer
City outside which the first–ever Grand Prix was held in 1906, on closed public roads; scene of the worst–ever motor racing accident (1955) Click to show or hide the answer
Venue of the Singapore Grand Prix, since 2008 when it became part of the Formula 1 World Championship – a.k.a. Singapore Street Circuit Click to show or hide the answer
High–speed home of the Italian Grand Prix, since 1922 (with three exceptions). Ronnie Petersen suffered a fatal crash there in 1978, leading directly to the race being held at Imola in 1980 (and the San Marino GP in later years) Click to show or hide the answer
Home of the German Grand Prix, 1927–76 (with 2 exceptions) and 1985; scene of Niki Lauda's near–fatal crash, 1976 Click to show or hide the answer
Original name of Austria's Red Bull Ring (also formerly known as the A1–Ring) Click to show or hide the answer
Knickerbrook, Druids and Lodge corners Click to show or hide the answer
Bedfordshire home of British drag racing Click to show or hide the answer
Abbey Corner, Farm Curve, Village Corner, The Loop, Aintree Corner, Wellington Straight, Brooklands Corner, Luffield Corner, Woodcote Corner, National Pits Straight, Copse Corner, Maggotts Corner, Becketts Corner, Chapel Curve, Hangar Straight, Stowe Corner, The Vale (straight), Club Corner, International Pits Straight; Bridge Corner, Priory Corner (removed in 2010) Click to show or hide the answer
Venue of the Belgian Grand Prix, since 1985 Click to show or hide the answer
Venue of the Japanese Grand Prix: 1963, 1964 (the first two) and every year since 1987 (except 2007 and 2008); also hosts an annual 8 Hour Endurance Road Race for motor cycles Click to show or hide the answer
Venue of the Dutch Grand Prix (1948–85) Click to show or hide the answer

Drivers (etc.)

Youngest ever Grand Prix winner, 2003; first Spanish driver to win a Grand Prix; youngest ever F1 world champion, 2005 (breaking Emerson Fittipaldi's record); won again in 2006 Click to show or hide the answer
US world F1 champion, 1978 (family moved from Italy in 1955 when he was 15) Click to show or hide the answer
F1 world champion 1952 and 1953: the second of only two Italian champions (to 2008, after Farina) Click to show or hide the answer
French driver: died in July 2015, aged 25, as a result of injuries sustained during the Japanese Grand Prix in October 2015; the first F1 driver to be killed as a result of a racing accident since Ayrton Senna in 1994 Click to show or hide the answer
Won the F1 World Championship in a car designed by himself (1966; previously won in a Cooper, 1959 and 1960) Click to show or hide the answer
British driver, won the Hungarian GP 2006 – his first win in 113 attempts Click to show or hide the answer
Last person to hold speed records on both land and water (both set in 1964) Click to show or hide the answer
First British driver to win the Indianapolis 500 (not counting Dario Resta, 1916 winner, who was born in Italy but raised in Britain from age 2); first non–US winner since 1920 (he and Graham Hill were the only non–US winners between 1920 and 1989 when Emerson Fittipaldi won) Click to show or hide the answer
Scottish driver, won 13 Grands Prix between 1995 and 2003; went on to become a commentator on BBC television, and subsequently on Channel 4 Click to show or hide the answer
"Team Principal" of McLaren, from 1980 Click to show or hide the answer
Argentine driver, most F1 world titles before Schumacher (5: 1951, 1954–7); the oldest champion (45) Click to show or hide the answer
Winner of the first F1 drivers' championship (1950) Click to show or hide the answer
Youngest F1 World Champion, before Lewis Hamilton (25, 1972) Click to show or hide the answer
Set a world land speed record of 91.37 mph on 12 Jan 1904 Click to show or hide the answer
The youngest ever F1 world champion (23 in 2008) Click to show or hide the answer
First British driver to win the Formula 1 World Championship (1958) Click to show or hide the answer
Promoted to Williams's race team following Nigel Mansell's departure in 1992; runner–up to Schumacher in the F1 drivers' championship in 1994 (by a single point) and 1995; champion in 1996 Click to show or hide the answer
First father and son to win the F1 world championship (second? ...) Click to show or hide the answer
Only driver to win the 'triple crown' Click to show or hide the answer
US world F1 champion, 1961 Click to show or hide the answer
Olympian and knight, finished 17th in the 2016 Le Mans 24 hour race Click to show or hide the answer
The first Polish driver to compete in Formula 1 (2006); won the Canadian Grand Prix 2008; seriously injured while competing in a rally for fun, February 2011 Click to show or hide the answer
The only woman ever to win an F1 championship point – finished 6th in Spanish GP of 1975 Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Second person (after Henry Cooper) to win BBC TV Sports Personality of the Year twice; robbed of the 1986 F1 world championship when a burst tyre forced him out of the Australian GP; missed his first two races for McLaren (1995) because he couldn't fit into the cockpit; first to win the F1 drivers' championship and Indycar in consecutive years (and thus to hold both titles simultaneously) Click to show or hide the answer
New Zealand driver, a protégé of Jack Brabham; founder of one of the most successful F1 marques; killed in 1970, aged 32, while testing one of his own cars at Goodwood Click to show or hide the answer
Won 16 Grands Prix; finished as runner–up in the World Championship in four consecutive years, 1955–8 (three times to Fangio, and to Hawthorn in 1958); came third in the following three years (1959–61); but never won it Click to show or hide the answer
The only French driver to win the F1 championship; retired 1993 after winning 51 grands prix (then a record) and 4 championships Click to show or hide the answer
Pipped Lewis Hamilton to the 2007 F1 drivers' championship; won Grands Prix in 2003 and 2018 (and various years in between) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Died during practice for the 1994 San Marino Grand Prix – the race in which Ayrton Senna died Click to show or hide the answer
Australian driver, born 1989: replaced his compatriot Mark Weber at Red Bull in 2014; finished 3rd in the drivers' championship in both 2014 and 2016 Click to show or hide the answer
Awarded the F1 World Championship posthumously in 1970, after being killed in practice at Monza Click to show or hide the answer
Second father and son to win the F1 world championship (first? ...) Click to show or hide the answer
Finnish F1 world champion, 1982 Click to show or hide the answer
First British driver to win a grand prix (1923) Click to show or hide the answer
Replaced Alain Prost in Williams's F1 team, 1993; died in 1994, after his car left the rack and hit a concrete wall while leading the San Marino GP; voted the greatest F1 driver ever, in a BBC poll in 2012 Click to show or hide the answer
Record 7 F1 world championships, 1994–2004; most Grand Prix wins (91) Click to show or hide the answer
The only person to win world championships on two wheels (motor cycling) and four (Formula 1) Click to show or hide the answer
Won a record 27 Grands Prix, 1968–73 Click to show or hide the answer
Youngest ever grand prix winner – Italy, 2008, aged 21; youngest ever Formula 1 World Champion (2010); also won it in the next three years, so becoming the youngest double, triple and quadruple champion, and one of only four 4–time winners Click to show or hide the answer
Canadian drivers: father (Gilles) died 1982 in practice for the Belgian GP; son (Jacques) was F1 world champion 1997 Click to show or hide the answer

Other Formula One people

Suffolk–born Chief Executive of Formula One Group, and de facto 'boss' of F1, from the mid–1970s, until 2017 when it was taken over by Liberty Media Click to show or hide the answer
Irish–born US media executive – former President, Vice Chairman and COO of Rupert Murdoch's News Corp; Vice Chairman of 20th Century Fox: replaced Bernie Ecclestone as Chief Executive of Formula One Group in 2017 when it was taken over by Liberty Media Click to show or hide the answer
President of the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA) – the governing body of world motor sport – from 2009 (French former rally driver) Click to show or hide the answer

British Formula 1 world champions

Mike Hawthorn Ferrari Click to show or hide the answer
Graham Hill BRM, Lotus Click to show or hide the answer
John Surtees Ferrari Click to show or hide the answer
Jim Clark Lotus Click to show or hide the answer
Jackie Stewart Matra, Tyrrell x 2 Click to show or hide the answer
James Hunt McLaren Click to show or hide the answer
Nigel Mansell Williams Click to show or hide the answer
Damon Hill Williams Click to show or hide the answer
Lewis Hamilton McLaren, Mercedes x 3 Click to show or hide the answer
Jenson Button Brawn Click to show or hide the answer

Teams (cars)

Jenson Button

2000 Click to show or hide the answer
2001 Click to show or hide the answer
2002 Click to show or hide the answer
2003–5 Click to show or hide the answer
2006–8 Click to show or hide the answer
2009 Click to show or hide the answer
2010–17 Click to show or hide the answer

Fangio, Farina, Fagioli: famous 1950 team of Click to show or hide the answer
Michael Schumacher won his first two F1 titles (1994, 1995) driving for Click to show or hide the answer
Replaced Honda in the 2009 F1 season – founded by, and named after, Honda's former team manager Click to show or hide the answer
Jackie Stewart won his first Grand Prix (Monaco, 1996) in a Click to show or hide the answer
Nikki Lauda's first two F1 titles (1975, 1977) Click to show or hide the answer
John Surtees won the Italian Grand Prix of 1967 in a Click to show or hide the answer
Michael Schumacher's first grand prix (Belgium, 1991): drove for Click to show or hide the answer
Racing marque founded by Colin Chapman, 1948; the one with which Jim Clark was most closely associated Click to show or hide the answer
Nikki Lauda's third F1 title (1984) Click to show or hide the answer
Constructor of the 6–wheeled car in which Jody Schekter won the 1976 Spanish Grand Prix Click to show or hide the answer
British winner of the first F1 constructors' championship, 1958 Click to show or hide the answer
Ayrton Senna's team at the time of his death (1994) Click to show or hide the answer
Italian word for "fans", widely used for followers of Ferrari Click to show or hide the answer

Tyres

The FIA announced in 2005 that from the 2008 season, there would be only one tyre supplier in Formula 1.

Sole tyre supplier to Formula 1, 2008–10; also in 1999, 2000 and 2007, but not by FIA ruling (Japanese company) Click to show or hide the answer
Sole tyre supplier to Formula 1, since 2011 (Italian company) Click to show or hide the answer

Slick tyres were introduced in 1970 by Goodyear. They were disallowed from 1999 to 2008 (inclusive).

Non–Formula 1

First British World Rally Championship winner, and the youngest ever (1995); died in a helicopter crash, in controversial circumstances, in 2007 – aged 39 Click to show or hide the answer
First English World Rally Championship winner (2001) Click to show or hide the answer
Make of car driven by both McRae and Burns to win the World Rally Championship – also by Petter Solberg (Norway) in 2003 Click to show or hide the answer

Length of a drag racing strip Click to show or hide the answer

Motor racing's richest event: first held in 1911, when it was won by Ray Haroun in a time of 6 hours and 42 minutes; the track is known as The Brickyard; held on Memorial Day (the last Monday in May); winner has received the Borg–Warner trophy (named after a leading US car parts supplier) since 1936 Click to show or hide the answer
French rally driver: won the World Championship nine consecutive times, from 2004 to 2012 Click to show or hide the answer
Endurance race from Brescia to Rome and back, over a figure–of–8 course, 1927–57 (with a break during WWII) – Stirling Moss set a record time in 1955 that still stands Click to show or hide the answer
First held in 1911, when it was won by Henri Rougier Click to show or hide the answer
Nigel Mansell's Indycar team Click to show or hide the answer
Number of laps in the Indianapolis 500 (each lap is 2½ miles) Click to show or hide the answer
British (US–based) driver, won the Indy 500 and the IndyCar championship in 2005 (2nd in 2004; tied for 1st place in 2006) Click to show or hide the answer

Motor Cycling

Speedway: number of laps in a race – also the number of riders in a race Click to show or hide the answer
MotoGP replaced 500cc class in world championships Click to show or hide the answer
Maximum displacement in MotoGP (2002–6) Click to show or hide the answer
Maximum displacement in MotoGP (since 2007) Click to show or hide the answer
Italian rider: won the 500cc World Championship seven times, 1966–72 Click to show or hide the answer
New Zealand rider: won four individual world speedway championships, 1957–66 Click to show or hide the answer
Born Liverpool, 1934; raced for Manchester's Belle Vue Aces from 1952 until his death in 1963; world speedway champion in 1955 and 1962; died following a racing accident in Edinburgh in 1963; the hospitality suite at the UK's National Speedway Stadium (at Belle Vue, Manchester) is named in his honour, and a memorial race meeting has been held at Belle Vue annually since 1967 Click to show or hide the answer
British World Superbike Champion, 1995 Click to show or hide the answer
Won the Isle of Man TT fourteen times Click to show or hide the answer
Legendary daredevil motorcyclist, born Butte, Montana in 1938. Most famous stunt was a televised attempt to jump Snake River Canyon, Idaho, in 1974. Broke 433 bones in his career; listed in the Guinness book as having "most bones broken in a lifetime." Died in 2007 aged 69 Click to show or hide the answer
New Zealand speedway legend – six times world champion, 1968–79 Click to show or hide the answer
US road racer, three times 500cc world champion, career ended by a crash at the Italian GP in 1993 Click to show or hide the answer
Italian rider, dominated the 500cc MotoGP class with 7 titles 2001–9 – nicknamed The Doctor Click to show or hide the answer
First rider to be World Motorcycle Champion at 250cc and 500cc in the same year (1985) Click to show or hide the answer
English World Superbike champion, 2004 and 2007 Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017–18