Monkey

Quiz Monkey
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Sport
Other Sports

On this page:

Archery
Badminton
Baseball
Basketball
Billiards
Equestrian Sports
Fencing
Greyhound Racing
Gymnastics
Hockey
Netball
Squash
Sumo
Swimming
Table Tennis
Tenpin Bowling
Volleyball
Winter sports
Yachting
Other Other Sports

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Other Sports

This page is about sports that don't have their own dedicated pages.

Archery

Colour of the central zone on the target (two rings – inner & outer) Click to show or hide the answer
Points for an outer gold Click to show or hide the answer
Points for an inner gold Click to show or hide the answer
The notch at the end of the shaft of an arrow (into which the string fits) Click to show or hide the answer

Highest standard Click to show or hide the answer

Badminton

Height of the net in the middle Click to show or hide the answer
Points to win a game Click to show or hide the answer

Baseball

Number of umpires Click to show or hide the answer
Distance between consecutive bases Click to show or hide the answer
Number of innings per side Click to show or hide the answer
Base–on–balls (BB) – batter advances to 1st base after receiving 4 legal balls: commonly known as a Click to show or hide the answer
Always has first innings Click to show or hide the answer
Play in which two runners are put out Click to show or hide the answer
Annual decider (since 1903) between the winners of the National and American Leagues Click to show or hide the answer
Number of games played in the World Series (maximum) Click to show or hide the answer
Fielder who squats behind the batter ̵ the equivalent of the wicket–keeper in cricket Click to show or hide the answer

Team some of whose players accepted bribes to lose the 1921 World Series final Click to show or hide the answer
Won the World Series in 2004, for the first time since 1918 – a "drought" blamed by superstition on a curse following the sale of Babe Ruth to the New York Yankees in 1919 Click to show or hide the answer
Beat the 'Curse of the Billy Goat' to win the World Series in 2016, for the first time since 1908 Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Babe Ruth's club, for most of his career (1920–34), and Joe Di Maggio's for all of his (1936–51) Click to show or hide the answer
The only major league baseball team from outside the USA; won the World Series in 1992 and 1993 Click to show or hide the answer

Holds the record for the longest hitting streak (at least one base hit – reaching at least first base – per game) – 56 in 1941; played for New York Yankees throughout his career (1936–42, 1946–51) Click to show or hide the answer
Set a new record for the number of home runs in a career, in 1998 Click to show or hide the answer
First black player (Brooklyn Dodgers 1947–56) Click to show or hide the answer
Considered by many to be the greatest baseball player of all time: played for Boston Red Sox 1914–19, New York Yankees 1920–34, Baltimore Braves 1935 Click to show or hide the answer

Basketball

Points for a basket, if thrown from inside the arc (6.25m in international games, 23' 9" in NBA) Click to show or hide the answer
Points for a basket, if thrown from outside the arc Click to show or hide the answer
Points for scoring from a free throw Click to show or hide the answer
Height of the hoop Click to show or hide the answer
Diameter of the hoop Click to show or hide the answer
Running with the ball, without dribbling (a violation) Click to show or hide the answer
Restart after a stoppage when no offence was committed: referee throws the ball up between two opposing players (also used at the start of the game or tip–off) Click to show or hide the answer
Jumping into the air and pushing the ball down into the basket (2 points) Click to show or hide the answer
Basketball legend – Boston Celtics, 1979–92: gave his name to the Twitter logo Click to show or hide the answer
Basketball legend, announced his retirement in 1991, aged 32, after testing positive for HIV Click to show or hide the answer
"The greatest basketball player of all time" (according to the NBA website): wore No. 23 for Chicago Bulls, 1984–93 and 1995–98; nicknamed Air (Nike named a shoe after him) Click to show or hide the answer
Founded in Chicago (sic), 1927, by Abraham Saperstein; theme tune Sweet Georgia Brown; famous players include Goose Tatum, Meadowlark Lemon, Curly Neal Click to show or hide the answer
Nickname of the New Zealand men's basketball team Click to show or hide the answer

Billiards

Yes, it's a sport.  See Darts.

Deliberately potting your opponent's cue ball (considered to be unsporting) Click to show or hide the answer
Hitting both other balls (your opponent's cue ball and the red ball) with your cue ball Click to show or hide the answer
Points for potting the red or going in off the red (i.e. if the red was hit first) Click to show or hide the answer
Points for a cannon, going in off your opponent's cue ball, or potting your opponent's cue ball Click to show or hide the answer

Croquet

Number of hoops Click to show or hide the answer
Number of balls used in a game Click to show or hide the answer
Colour of the balls One team Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer
The other team Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer
A shot where the player's ball hits another ball Click to show or hide the answer
The shot that follows a roquet (where the player's ball is placed next to the ball that it hit, allowing the player to move both balls) Click to show or hide the answer

Equestrian Sports

The three disciplines in three–day eventing are (in competition order):

Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

Wikipedia tells us that three–day eventing "is more commonly now run over four days, with dressage on the first two days followed by cross country the next day and then show jumping in reverse order on the final day."

Faults for a refusal (previously 3) Click to show or hide the answer
Faults for knocking a fence down Click to show or hide the answer
Faults if the rider falls off Click to show or hide the answer
Penalty for two refusals (previously three) Click to show or hide the answer
Event with specially high and wide fences Click to show or hide the answer
Two riders who have won the World Championships twice (West Germany – 1954, 1955) Click to show or hide the answer
(Italy – 1956, 1960) Click to show or hide the answer
2006: Zara Phillips won the European and World Three Day Eventing championships on Click to show or hide the answer
Won the King George V Gold Cup at the Royal International Horse show on Foxhunter in 1948, 1950 & 1953 Click to show or hide the answer
British show jumper, gave his name to the two–fingered gesture that he made at Hickstead in 1971 Click to show or hide the answer

Fencing

The three disciplines are (in alphabetical order):

Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

Parts of the body that are valid as targets:

Epée Click to show or hide the answer
Foil Click to show or hide the answer
Sabre Click to show or hide the answer

More correct term for the 'strip' on which a bout takes place Click to show or hide the answer
The basic defensive technique: blocking the opponent's weapon when he or she is attacking Click to show or hide the answer
A counterattack, made immediately after a successful parry Click to show or hide the answer

Greyhound Racing

Jacket Colours

Note that these are the colours used in Europe, including the UK and Ireland. Different colours are used elsewhere (notably in the USA, Australia and New Zealand).

1 Click to show or hide the answer 2 Click to show or hide the answer 5 Click to show or hide the answer
4 Click to show or hide the answer 3 Click to show or hide the answer 6 Click to show or hide the answer

At one time, eight traps were used. (They still are in the USA, Australia and New Zealand.) I've never been asked about traps 7 and 8 in a quiz, but for completeness, the colours were:

7 Click to show or hide the answer 8 Click to show or hide the answer

The Greyhound Derby

First held (year) Click to show or hide the answer
Venue from inception to 1984 Click to show or hide the answer
... except in 1940, when it was held at Click to show or hide the answer

The Greyhound Derby was not held between 1941 and 1944 (inclusive).

Venue from 1985 to 2016 Click to show or hide the answer
Venue from 2017 – scheduled until 2021 Click to show or hide the answer
Current distance Click to show or hide the answer

At Wimbledon the distance was 480 metres. At White City it was 500 metres from 1975, previous to which it was 525 yards – except in the very first year when it was 500 yards.

Other

Number of dogs in a race in the USA, Australia and New Zealand Click to show or hide the answer
Won 32 consecutive races, from 25 August 1984 to 9 December 1986 Click to show or hide the answer
Perfected by Owen Smith in 1919 Click to show or hide the answer
First to win the Greyhound Derby twice (1929–30); credited with inspiring the great increase in the popularity of greyhound racing at that time; body stuffed after death and displayed in the Natural History Museum – now in its Tring, Hertfordshire site (along with many other stuffed animals) Click to show or hide the answer

Gymnastics

Men's events

Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

Women's events

Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

Common events

The two events that are common to both men's and women's gymnastics are:

Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

Points deducted

For small errors Click to show or hide the answer
For medium errors Click to show or hide the answer
For large errors Click to show or hide the answer
For falling off Click to show or hide the answer

Gymnasts

Britain's first ever world champion (uneven bars 2006 and 2010, floor 2009) Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's first ever men's world champion (pommel horse, 2015); also won two gold medals (pommel horse and floor exercises) at the 2016 Olympics Click to show or hide the answer
The first British gymnast to win medals at three Olympiads: bronze in Beijing, and silver at London and Rio (all on the pommel horse); also team bronze in London Click to show or hide the answer

Hockey

Known in some parts as Field Hockey. For Ice Hockey, see Winter Sports.

Start of a game Click to show or hide the answer
Width of the goal Click to show or hide the answer
Star striker of Britain's men's hockey team of the 1980s – scored 7 goals in the 1984 Olympics, and 8 in 1988 (including a hat trick against Australia in the semi–final) when Britain's team won the gold medal; also Britain's top scorer in 1992 Click to show or hide the answer

Ironman

Ironman events are organised by the World Triathlon Corporation.

Swimming distance Click to show or hide the answer
Cycling distance Click to show or hide the answer
Running distance Click to show or hide the answer

The running distance is rounded up from the normal Marathon distance, which is 26.21875 miles.

Maximum time allowed to complete the course (to be designated an Ironman) Click to show or hide the answer

Netball

Height of the net Click to show or hide the answer
Players who can score Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer
Defends against the Goal Shooter Click to show or hide the answer
Defends against Goal Attack Click to show or hide the answer
Can move in the attacking and centre thirds, but not in the shooting circle Click to show or hide the answer
Can move in the defending and centre thirds, but not in the shooting circle Click to show or hide the answer
Can move anywhere but in the shooting circles Click to show or hide the answer
Games are started (and restarted after a goal) with a Click to show or hide the answer

Squash

Shot that hits the side wall before hitting the front wall Click to show or hide the answer
The lower part of the front wall (up to 48cm, 18.9") – made of a different material (often metal) so that it makes a distinctive sound when hit by the ball Click to show or hide the answer
Australian, b. 1947; World No. 1 1975–80, British Open champion 8 times, 1969–81; World Open champion in its first four years (1976–80) Click to show or hide the answer
Probably the best squash player ever: Pakistani, b. 1963; World Open champion 1981–6 and 1988; British Open champion in 10 consecutive years, 1982–91; unbeaten in 555 competitive matches, 1981–6 Click to show or hide the answer
Pakistani, b. 1952; British Open champion 1975, runner–up to Hunt in 3 World and 3 British Opens; runner–up to Jahangir in 1 World and 1 British Open Click to show or hide the answer

Sumo

Name of the 'ring' Click to show or hide the answer
Major tournament Click to show or hide the answer
Highest ranking ('grand champion') Click to show or hide the answer

Swimming

Oldest stroke in competitive swimming Click to show or hide the answer
Stroke first recognised for competition in 1953 Click to show or hide the answer
First stroke in a medley Click to show or hide the answer
Length of an Olympic pool Click to show or hide the answer
Number of lanes in an Olympic pool Click to show or hide the answer
Longest (individual?) freestyle event Click to show or hide the answer
East German swimmer: 8 Olympic medals 1972–6, including 4 golds in '76, and 10 World Championship medals 1973 and 1975 Click to show or hide the answer
Australian swimmer: daughter of a Scottish footballer; won 3 100m freestyle Olympic golds, 1956–64; 27 individual world records; 59.9 secs, 27 Oct 1962 Click to show or hide the answer
First Briton to swim the 100m breaststroke in less than one minute (1987) Click to show or hide the answer
First to swim 100m in one minute or 400m in five minutes Click to show or hide the answer

Table Tennis

Dimensions of the table Click to show or hide the answer
Height of the net, above the table Click to show or hide the answer
Before celluloid, the balls were made from Click to show or hide the answer
Five times runner–up in the world championships Click to show or hide the answer
Hungarian world singles and doubles champion 1932–5; total 5 singles, 8 men's doubles, 2 mixed doubles Click to show or hide the answer

Tenpin Bowling

Length of the lane Click to show or hide the answer
Maximum weight of the ball Click to show or hide the answer
Knocking all 10 pins down with the first delivery Click to show or hide the answer
Knocking all 10 pins down with two deliveries Click to show or hide the answer
Each player's "turn" of two deliveries (or one if (s)he scores a Strike) Click to show or hide the answer
Three strikes in a row Click to show or hide the answer
Number of frames (for each player) in a game Click to show or hide the answer
Highest possible score (in the 'perfect game') Click to show or hide the answer
Number of balls bowled (or strikes hit) to score 300 Click to show or hide the answer

Volleyball

A team can hit the ball (before passing it over the net) Click to show or hide the answer
Each team's first touch of the ball: a pass to the "setter" Click to show or hide the answer
Second touch: aiming for the attacker Click to show or hide the answer
Third touch: the attacker aims to hit the ball down into the opponents' court (equivalent to a smash in tennis) Click to show or hide the answer
Player with specialised defensive skills, can replace any back–row player during a game (position introduced internationally 1998). Italian term, also used in football for a sweeper Click to show or hide the answer

Winter Sports

Competition where one or two people lie feet–first, face up (supine) on a sled; name derives from a French word, meaning a small coasting sled Click to show or hide the answer
Competition where one person lies head–first, face down (prone) on a sled; used on the Cresta Run Click to show or hide the answer
Church Leap; Curzon, Brabazon, Thoma; Battledore, Shuttlecock; Scylla, Charybdis: corners or features of the Click to show or hide the answer
Swiss winter resort: home of the Cresta run Click to show or hide the answer

Bobsleigh

Last man Click to show or hide the answer

Curling

The captain is referred to as Click to show or hide the answer
Rock that the stones are (usually) made from Click to show or hide the answer
The target area is referred to as the Click to show or hide the answer
The circle at the centre of the 'house' (16 feet from the backboard) Click to show or hide the answer
The line through the 'button', drawn parallel to the backboard Click to show or hide the answer
The line drawn parallel to the backboard and 37 feet from it, which stones must cross in order to count Click to show or hide the answer
The last stone in each end Click to show or hide the answer

Ice Dancing

The UK's last world champions before Torvill and Dean (4 times, 1966–9) Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer
Torvill & Dean's coach Click to show or hide the answer

Ice Hockey

Start of a game Click to show or hide the answer
Pucks are made of Click to show or hide the answer
Equivalent of a goalkeeper Click to show or hide the answer
Canadian ice hockey legend, 1928–2016: gave his name to the 'hat–trick' of a goal, an assist and a fight in the same game Click to show or hide the answer
Won the Art Ross Trophy (awarded annually to the highest scorer) seven consecutive times, 1981–7, and ten times in total 1981–94 Click to show or hide the answer

Ice Skating

First section of a competition Click to show or hide the answer
Number of turns in a double Axel Click to show or hide the answer
East German ice skater: won 6 European, 4 World and 2 Olympic titles, 1982–8; also won an Emmy for the film Carmen on Ice Click to show or hide the answer

Skiing

The Vasaloppet (literally, the Vasa Race) – the world's oldest, longest, and biggest (in terms of participants) cross–country ski race – is held annually, on the first Sunday of March, in Click to show or hide the answer
Five times Overall British Senior Champion, 2002–8; named (apparently) after Jimena, wife of El Cid (as played by Sophia Loren in the 1961 film) Click to show or hide the answer
French skier: dominated the sport in the late 1960s, winning all three Alpine events at the 1968 Winter Olympics (Grenoble) Click to show or hide the answer
Austrian skier: won 25 World Cup downhills, dominating the event from 1975 to 1978. Gold medalist at the 1976 Winter Olympics (Innsbruck) Click to show or hide the answer
Austrian skier: won 62 World Cup events, 1970–80 – a record only broken by Lindsey Vonn in 2016 – winning the overall title 6 times, including 5 years in a row 1971–5 Click to show or hide the answer
Swedish skier, regarded as the greatest slalom and giant slalom specialist of all time; won a record 86 World Cup events, 1975–89; won both events at the 1980 winter Olympics (Lake Placid); banned from the 1984 Olympics for accepting promotional payments; allowed back in 1988, but was past his prime and "did not medal" Click to show or hide the answer
The USA's most successful ski racer ever: passed Annemarie Moser–Pröll's record of 62 women's World Cup victories in 2016 Click to show or hide the answer

Piste grades (European) – in ascending order of difficulty:

Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

Speed Skating

British short track speed skater: won two gold medals at the 1988 Winter Olympics when short track speed skating was a demonstration sport; World Champion 1991 Click to show or hide the answer

Yachting

Races (etc.)

Held annually 1925–33, subsequently every two years (except for a break during WWII), from Cowes (Isle of Wight) to the eponymous rock off the south of Ireland, and back to Plymouth; was the last race in the Admirals' Cup, while that event was held (1957–99, and 2003). 15 competitors died in the 1979 race; Simon le Bon and his crew were rescued by the Royal Navy after his yacht Drum capsized in 1985 Click to show or hide the answer
Won by Robin Knox–Johnston and Peter Blake in 1994, for sailing around the world in a new record time (75 days) Click to show or hide the answer
Famous race that starts on Boxing Day each year (since 1945): the course is about 630 miles, and normally takes about 3 days; the record time was 1 day, 18 hrs, 23 mins and 12 secs, in 2012; the longest winning time was 4/11:53:27, in 1946; the 2015 time was 4/07:27:13; won in 1969 by Edward Heath in the original Morning Cloud Click to show or hide the answer
Round–the–world single–handed (solo) yacht race, sailed non–stop and without assistance; founded by Philippe Jeantot in 1989, and held every four years since 1992; named after the département in France in which it starts and ends Click to show or hide the answer

People

British–born businessman: led the syndicate that won the America's Cup for Australia in 1983 – the first time it had been taken from the New York Yacht Club; later served 4 years in prison after being convicted of fraud in 1997 Click to show or hide the answer
America's Cup: winning skipper of Stars & Stripes (1989) Click to show or hide the answer
1990 Whitbread Round–the–World Race: Maiden (all–woman crew): skipper Click to show or hide the answer

Other

Letter that identifies British boats Click to show or hide the answer
Sailing into the wind Click to show or hide the answer
Sailing before the wind Click to show or hide the answer
Sailing a zig–zag course into the wind Click to show or hide the answer
Landlocked country that won the America's Cup in 2003 Click to show or hide the answer
Ellen MacArthur's boat on her 2000–1 solo circumnavigation Click to show or hide the answer
The Royal Yacht Squadron is based at Click to show or hide the answer
Title usually given to the president of a yacht club (also a senior rank in the Royal Navy) Click to show or hide the answer

Miscellaneous

Event that takes place annually, in April or May, at the Gloucestershire estate of the Duke of Beaufort Click to show or hide the answer

Australian Rules Football: start of a game Click to show or hide the answer
Australian Rules Football: kicking between the inner (goal) and outer (behind) posts – scores one point (a goal scores 6) Click to show or hide the answer
Biathlon: the two sports involved Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer
Bowls (Crown Green): minimum distance the jack must be bowled Click to show or hide the answer
Diving: Olympic heightsSpringboard Click to show or hide the answer
High diving board Click to show or hide the answer
Diving: Britain's 15–year–old world 10–metre champion, 2009 Click to show or hide the answer
Gymnastics: South–African born British gymnast, Britain's first gymnastics world champion and the most decorated British gymnast ever – European and World champion on the uneven bars, 2006 Click to show or hide the answer
Harness racing (a.k.a. trotting): name of the cart Click to show or hide the answer
Hurling: name used for the stick Click to show or hide the answer
Hurling: name of the ball (also used in shinty, camogie and rounders) Click to show or hide the answer

Judo: highest grade Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Judo: traditional garment Click to show or hide the answer
Judo: a throw that wins the contest by placing the opponent on his or her back, with impetus and control Click to show or hide the answer

Polo: width of the goal Click to show or hide the answer
Polo: teams change ends Click to show or hide the answer
Pool: number of balls (in eight–ball and straight) – including the cue ball Click to show or hide the answer
Real Tennis: name given to the the sloping roof that runs round three sides of the court Click to show or hide the answer
Three–day eventing: most wins at Badminton Married name Click to show or hide the answer
Birth surname Click to show or hide the answer
Tug o'War: distance a team must pull the other to win Click to show or hide the answer

Difference between running and walking: in race walking ... Click to show or hide the answer

Weightlifting: lift dropped from international competition in 1972 owing to difficulties in judging (leaving the snatch and the clean & jerk) Click to show or hide the answer
Wrestling: hold that aims to force a submission by twisting one or both of the opponent's arms behind his back Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017–18