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Sport
Rugby Union

On this page:

Rules, etc.
History
Players
Coaches
Internationals
World Cups
Clubs
Nicknames
Other

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Rugby Union

Rules, etc.

Players allowed per side, until 1877 Click to show or hide the answer
Height of the crossbar Click to show or hide the answer
Maximum distance between the goal line and the dead ball line Click to show or hide the answer
Number of players in the scrum (per side) Click to show or hide the answer
Centre of the front row Click to show or hide the answer
Other front row forwards Click to show or hide the answer
Second row forwards Click to show or hide the answer
Either side of the No. 8, in the back row (formerly known as wing forwards) Click to show or hide the answer
Puts the ball into a set scrum, and feeds it out to the backs; wears No. 9 Click to show or hide the answer
Link between the scrum half and backs; marks the opposing scrum half; wears No. 10 Click to show or hide the answer

History

Credited with inventing rugby football (at Rugby School, in 1823); the (Union) World Cup trophy is named after him Click to show or hide the answer
Home International Championship instituted Click to show or hide the answer
France joined, making it the Five Nations tournament Click to show or hide the answer
Rugby Union went professional Click to show or hide the answer
Italy joined the Five Nations, making it Six Click to show or hide the answer

The Premiership

First season Click to show or hide the answer
Original sponsor (1987–97 – brewing company) Click to show or hide the answer
Original champions (1987–8, and on 9 more occasions up to and including 2012–13 – more than any other club, up to and including 2015–16) Click to show or hide the answer
Sponsor 2010–17 (insurance company) Click to show or hide the answer
Number of teams Click to show or hide the answer
Points for a win Click to show or hide the answer
Points for a draw Click to show or hide the answer
Minimum number of tries for a bonus point Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Maximum losing margin for a losing bonus point Click to show or hide the answer

Players

Venezuelan–born French full back (and wing), 93 caps 1980–91 – then a world record Click to show or hide the answer
Australia's all–time leading try–scorer: 64 in 101 matches, 1982-96 – more than any other player except Daisuke Ohata of Japan (69) Click to show or hide the answer
England captain 1988–96: three Grand Slams (1991/92/95), World Cup final 1991 Click to show or hide the answer
New Zealand fly–half, 2003–15: vied with Jonny Wilkinson to be the leading all–time international points scorer, but comfortably claimed the record after Wilkinson's retirement; Man of the Match in the 2015 World Cup Final (scoring 19 points in a 34–17 win over Australia); BBC Overseas Sports Personality of the Year, 2015 Click to show or hide the answer
New Zealand player, nicknamed 'The Boot' – scored 207 points in 31 Test matches, 1956–64 Click to show or hide the answer
Controversially denied a try for England in the 2007 World Cup final Click to show or hide the answer
Captain of Wales's Grand Slam winning team in 1971, and of the first and only Lions team (up to and including 2017) to win a Test series in New Zealand, in the same year Click to show or hide the answer
Captain of Wales, 78 appearances and 33 tries, 1987–98 Click to show or hide the answer
Played 61 Tests for Scotland, 1986–95 – 20 as captain; captain of the 1994 Lions Click to show or hide the answer
77 caps for Wales, 1991–2003; first player to score 1,000 points in Tests; world record for number of international points scored overtaken by Jonny Wilkinson in 2008 Click to show or hide the answer
Captain of the victorious British Lions in South Africa, 1997, and of England's World Cup winning side 2003 Click to show or hide the answer
English prop forward 1990–2004, the world's most–capped player (114 for England, 5 for the Lions) until overtaken by Australia's George Gregan 2006 Click to show or hide the answer
Australian fly half, 72 caps (1984–95); record of 911 international points broken by Neil Jenkins Click to show or hide the answer
Irish lock, played a record 63 times for Ireland and 17 times for the British Lions, 1962–75; captain in South Africa 1974, when the infamous "99" call (a signal for all 15 players to start fighting) was introduced Click to show or hide the answer
All Blacks captain, 2006–15 (including the victorious 2011 World Cup champions) Click to show or hide the answer
England's most–capped hooker; most consecutive England caps Click to show or hide the answer
Russian prince who won four caps for England, 1936 – scoring two tries in their first victory over New Zealand – killed in WWII while training as a pilot officer Click to show or hide the answer
Captain of the South Africa team, surprise winners of the 1995 World Cup Click to show or hide the answer
Scored England's only try in the 2003 World Cup Final victory over Australia Click to show or hide the answer
Capped for both England and New Zealand in the 1980s Click to show or hide the answer
Last to gain full caps for England at both rugby (1 cap 1956) and cricket (50 Tests, last 1972); also captained the cricket team in 25 Tests, 1963–6 Click to show or hide the answer
Made the longest successful penalty kick in an international (210ft 8½", 64.224 metres), for Wales v. Scotland in 1986 Click to show or hide the answer
England's leading try–scorer (49, 1984–96; also 1 for the Lions); RAF pilot Click to show or hide the answer
Passed Neil Jenkins's total to become the leading points scorer in international rugby union, March 2008 (but see Dan Carter) Click to show or hide the answer
Wales's all–time leading try–scorer: 58 in 87 matches, 2000–11; also scored 2 for the Lions, making a total of 60 in all internationals – more than any other player except Daisuke Ohata of Japan (69) and David Campese of Australia (64) Click to show or hide the answer
Harlequins wing at the centre of the Bloodgate scandal, 2009 Click to show or hide the answer

Coaches

England National Coaches (since 1997)

1997–2004 Click to show or hide the answer 2004–6 Click to show or hide the answer 2006–8 Click to show or hide the answer
2008–11 Click to show or hide the answer 2011–15 Click to show or hide the answer 2015– Click to show or hide the answer

Coached England for one month in 2008, before Johnson took up his post Click to show or hide the answer

Other

Born Leeds; 32 caps for Scotland, toured with the Lions in 1974 and 1977; coached Scotland 1988–2003 and 1999–2003; coached the Lions in 1989, 1993, 1997, 2009; also coached Northampton and was Director of Rugby at Wasps; knighted 2010 Click to show or hide the answer
Harlequins coach, banned for 3 years for his part in the Bloodgate scandal, 2009 Click to show or hide the answer
Coach of Bath RUFC during their 'golden era' (1978–94); went on to coach England 1995–7; returned to Bath as Director of Rugby in 2002 Click to show or hide the answer

Internationals

Trophy for matches between Australia and New Zealand Click to show or hide the answer
Trophy for matches between England and Scotland (made from rupees) Click to show or hide the answer
Trophy for matches between England and New Zealand (since 2008) Click to show or hide the answer
England's opponents when Erica Roe streaked (1982) Click to show or hide the answer
Beaten 110–0 by England in 1998 Click to show or hide the answer
Winners of the inaugural Six Nations tournament (2000) Click to show or hide the answer

World Cups

Year   Hosts Winners
1987 Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
1991 Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
1995 Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
1999 Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
2003 Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
2007 Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
2011 Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
2015 Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
2019 Click to show or hide the answer

Clubs

Formed 1890 as a result of a meeting at the Alexandra Hotel, Bradford; spiritual home (until c. 1970) was the Esplanade Hotel, Penarth, Glamorgan Click to show or hide the answer
Recreation Ground: home of Click to show or hide the answer
Founded in 2003 by the merger of Bridgend and Pontypridd; folded 2004 Click to show or hide the answer
Kingsholm: home of Click to show or hide the answer
Play home games at The Stoop; Will Carling's club, and Brian Moore's; involved in the "Bloodgate" scandal 2009 – coach Dean Richards, player Tom Williams Click to show or hide the answer
Home ground Welford Road; nickname The Tigers Click to show or hide the answer
Play home games at Reading's Madejski Stadium Click to show or hide the answer
Birmingham's biggest Rugby Union club Click to show or hide the answer
Nicknamed The Welsh All Blacks (see Ospreys) Click to show or hide the answer
Nicknamed The Saints; home ground Franklin's Gardens Click to show or hide the answer
Formed in 2003 by the merger of Swansea and Neath; play at the Liberty Stadium Click to show or hide the answer
Monmouthshire club that provided the formidable front row of the Welsh national team, in the 1970s: Charlie Faulkner (loose head prop), Bobby Windsor (hooker) and Graham Price (tight head prop) – as celebrated in song by Max Boyce; also known as 'the Viet Gwent' Click to show or hide the answer
Share the A. J. Bell Stadium (previously Salford City Stadium) with Salford Red Devils RLFC (previously Salford Reds); previously (2003–12) played home games at Edgeley Park, Stockport Click to show or hide the answer
Play home games at Allianz Park, part of the Barnet Copthall leisure complex in Hendon, North London; previously (1997–2013) played at Vicarage Road, Watford Click to show or hide the answer
Based at the Ricoh Arena, Coventry, since 2014 (after buying it outright); based in Sudbury, Middlesex, 1923–97; first English champions of the professional era (1996–7); played at Loftus Road, home of Queens Park Rangers FC (1997–2002); Adams Park, home of Wycombe Wanderers FC (2002–14); included the word London in their name, 1999–2014 Click to show or hide the answer

Brumbies play home games in Click to show or hide the answer

Nicknames

Argentina Click to show or hide the answer
Australia Click to show or hide the answer
Japan Originally Click to show or hide the answer
More recently Click to show or hide the answer
New Zealand Click to show or hide the answer
South Africa Click to show or hide the answer
USA Click to show or hide the answer

Other

Bath RUFC's full–back wears 16, not 15, because Click to show or hide the answer
Won the county Championship seven times in eight years, 1958 – 65 Click to show or hide the answer
Watsonians RUFC: based in Click to show or hide the answer
Ireland's home of international Rugby Union matches (closed for renovation, 2007–9) Click to show or hide the answer
Ireland's largest stadium, used during the renovation of Lansdowne Road Click to show or hide the answer
The home of 7–a–side rugby (town in the Scottish borders) Click to show or hide the answer
Catalan Dragons (Dragons Catalans): based at (capital of the Pyrénées–Orientales department) Click to show or hide the answer

Colours of the socks worn by the Barbarians Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017