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Tennis

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Rules
Timeline
Wimbledon
Players
Other

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Tennis

Rules

Height of the net in the middle Click to show or hide the answer
Height of the net at each end Click to show or hide the answer
Width of each tramline Click to show or hide the answer
Length of the court Click to show or hide the answer
Score in games at which the tie–break comes into operation Click to show or hide the answer
Points to win a tie–break (minimum) Click to show or hide the answer
Number of points between changes of end, in a tie–break Click to show or hide the answer

Timeline

The first Wimbledon tournament Click to show or hide the answer
Men's doubles first contested at Wimbledon Click to show or hide the answer
Women's singles first contested at Wimbledon Click to show or hide the answer
French national championships first held Click to show or hide the answer
Davis Cup first held (as the International Lawn Tennis Challenge) – USA v. GB Click to show or hide the answer
Australasian Championships (forerunner of the Australian Open) first held Click to show or hide the answer
Women's doubles and mixed doubles first contested at Wimbledon Click to show or hide the answer
The last time Wimbledon was a challenge tournament Click to show or hide the answer
French championships opened to international competitors Click to show or hide the answer
Fred Perry's three consecutive Wimbledon wins Click to show or hide the answer
Great Britain's ninth and last Davis Cup win Click to show or hide the answer
International Lawn Tennis Challenge renamed the Davis Cup following the death of Dwight F. Davis Click to show or hide the answer
Won the Davis Cup 15 times in 18 years, 1950–67 (2nd to USA overall) Click to show or hide the answer

In the 16 years between 1956 and 1971 (inclusive), six different Australians won the Wimbledon men's singles tournament a total of 13 times between them:

1956, 1957 Click to show or hide the answer
1958 Click to show or hide the answer
1959 (USA) Alex Olmedo
1960 Click to show or hide the answer
1961, 1962, 1968, 1969 Click to show or hide the answer
1963 (USA) Chuck McKinley
1964, 1965 Click to show or hide the answer
1966 (Spain) Manuel Santana
1967, 1970, 1971 Click to show or hide the answer

The first Open Wimbledon (Laver beat Roche in straight sets in the final);
French championships also opened to professionals (becoming the French Open);
US Open first held (created by combining five separate tournaments)
Click to show or hide the answer
US Open had both Amateur and Open tournaments Click to show or hide the answer
Australian Championships became open Click to show or hide the answer
Tie–break introduced at Wimbledon Click to show or hide the answer
US Open changed from grass courts to clay Click to show or hide the answer
Sweden becomes the first non–Anglophone country to win the Davis Cup Click to show or hide the answer
Bjorn Borg's five consecutive Wimbledon Men's Singles titles Click to show or hide the answer

Bjorn Borg's Wimbledon final victims:

1976 Click to show or hide the answer 1977, 78 Click to show or hide the answer 1979 Click to show or hide the answer 1980 Click to show or hide the answer

Australian Open played twice because it changed from January to December Click to show or hide the answer
Ball girls first appeared at Wimbledon (not on Centre Court until 1988) Click to show or hide the answer
US Open moved from Forest Hills to Flushing Meadows Click to show or hide the answer
Catherine McTavish becomes Wimbledon's first female umpire Click to show or hide the answer
Borg's last Wimbledon men's singles final, and his only defeat Click to show or hide the answer
Martina Navratilova's six consecutive Wimbledon singles titles Click to show or hide the answer
Australian Open not played because it changed from December back to January Click to show or hide the answer
Yellow balls introduced (at Wimbledon) Click to show or hide the answer
Australian Open moves from Kooyong to Flinders Park Click to show or hide the answer
Martina Navratilova's record 9th Wimbledon singles title Click to show or hide the answer
Pete Sampras wins the Wimbledon men's singles title seven years out of eight (see Richard Krajicek) Click to show or hide the answer
France wins the Davis Cup for the first time since 1932 (also won in 1996 and 2001) Click to show or hide the answer
Roger Federer's five consecutive Wimbledon men's singles titles (he also won in 2009 and 2012) Click to show or hide the answer
Roger Federer's five consecutive US Open men's singles titles Click to show or hide the answer
USA wins the Davis Cup for the 32nd time (and the last up to 2016 …) Click to show or hide the answer
Wimbledon Centre Court roof used for the first time Click to show or hide the answer

Wimbledon

Word missing from the official title of the venue: 'The All England Lawn Tennis and ... Club' – the sport that the club was originally founded for in 1868 Click to show or hide the answer
Computer system, based on infra–red light, used to judge line calls on the ATP and WTA tours from 1980 (replaced by Hawk–Eye, in 2007 at Wimbledon) Click to show or hide the answer

For more information on Hawk–Eye, please refer to Applied Science.

Indian brothers who reached the doubles semi–finals in 1976 Click to show or hide the answer
First black men's singles champion (1975) Click to show or hide the answer
Last Briton to play in the men's singles final, before Andy Murray (1938); died 2000 Click to show or hide the answer
Mixed Doubles champions in 1980: the first brother and sister to win a Grand Slam title together Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
British mixed doubles winners, 1987 Click to show or hide the answer
Youngest ever (17 years 228 days, 1985), and only unseeded, men's singles champion Click to show or hide the answer
Youngest men's singles champion, before Becker (20); won the first of his five consecutive titles without losing a set – still the only man to do so at Wimbledon Click to show or hide the answer
Brazilian winner of the women's singles title 1959, 1960 and 1964 (also runner–up 1965 and 1966; also won the US Open four times in the same period) Click to show or hide the answer
1987 champion (Australian) – first to climb into the stands to celebrate with family and friends Click to show or hide the answer
Beat Rosewall in the 1974 final; also won in 1982; lost finals to Ashe (1975), Borg twice (1977, 1978), McEnroe (1984 – 6–1, 6–1, 6–2) Click to show or hide the answer
Beaten by Becker in the 1985 final (born in South Africa, took US citizenship just before the 1985 tournament) Click to show or hide the answer
Beat Becker in the first round, 1987 Click to show or hide the answer
Beat Rosewall in the longest–ever (men's singles) final, 1954 Click to show or hide the answer
Lost six doubles finals, 1965–75; but was the last French player to win a grand slam tournament (1967) before Mary Pierce in Australian Open, 1995 Click to show or hide the answer
Men's champion 1988 – final played over two days because of rain Click to show or hide the answer
Martina Navratilova's final victim in 1978, 1979, 1982, 1984, 1985 Click to show or hide the answer
Losing finalist in Martina Navratilova's record–breaking 9th (and last) singles victory (1990) Click to show or hide the answer
The first black Wimbledon singles champion (women's, 1957; d. 2003) Click to show or hide the answer
Won women's singles in 1971 and 1980 – the longest ever gap Click to show or hide the answer
Winner of the first men's singles tournament (1877) Click to show or hide the answer
Seven Wimbledon championships, 1988 to 1997; delayed Navratilova's record 9th singles title by winning in 1988 and 1989 (won Grand Slam both years) Click to show or hide the answer
Wimbledon men's singles champion 2002 – last before the "big four" (Federer, Nadal, Djokovic, Murray) who between them won the next 12 tournaments (and counting) Click to show or hide the answer
Winner of the longest ever professional tennis match: US 23rd seed at Wimbledon 2010, 1st round, beat French qualifier Nicolas Mahut 70–68 in the final set. The final set took 8 hours 11 minutes and the whole match (183 games) took 11 hours minutes over three days. Lost in straight sets in the 2nd round to unseeded Thiemo de Bakker (Netherlands) – 6–0 6–3 6–2 Click to show or hide the answer
Croatian player: Wimbledon (men's singles) runner–up in 1992, 1994 and 1998, but won in 2001 as a wild card entrant; beat Tim Henman in the semi–finals, after rain interrupted play with Henman leading 2–1 in sets – Henman was two points from victory at one point Click to show or hide the answer
Jamie Murray's (Serbian) partner, in the Mixed Doubles 2007 Click to show or hide the answer
British winner of the 1969 Wimbledon Ladies' Singles; first left hander to win the title; also won the French Open in 1961 and 1966 (Note: born Adrianne Shirley Haydon. Married P. F. Jones 1962) Click to show or hide the answer
Beaten by Ann Jones in the 1969 ladies' singles final Click to show or hide the answer
Czech player who won the 1973 men's singles title after 79 of the 82 ATP players withdrew in protest at the suspension of Nikki Pilic Click to show or hide the answer
Won Wimbledon in 1996, spoiling Pete Sampras's sequence (1993–2000) Click to show or hide the answer
Won Junior Wimbledon, lost men's singles finals in 1986 (Becker) and 1987 (Cash), but never won the senior title Click to show or hide the answer
French winner of the first five women's singles titles after World War I; died of leukaemia, 1934, aged 35 Click to show or hide the answer
First British male player to win a Wimbledon title after Fred Perry (Mixed Doubles, 1983) Click to show or hide the answer
1994: first apart from Navratilova and Graf to win Ladies' Singles since 1981 Click to show or hide the answer
Won the 1962 Wimbledon Junior championships (son of a famous footballer) Click to show or hide the answer
Ended Borg's run of 5 consecutive men's singles titles (1976–80); only player to beat Borg in a men's singles final (1981); first champion born in Germany; first singles champion not invited to join the All England Club Click to show or hide the answer
8 women's singles titles, 1927–38 – record broken by Navratilova in 1990 Click to show or hide the answer
Winner of the last all–British singles final (1961 – beat Christine Truman) Click to show or hide the answer
Second left hander to win the women's singles title Click to show or hide the answer
Won the last Amateur Wimbledon (1967) Click to show or hide the answer
French Open champion in 1983 (his only Grand Slam win) – the first French winner in 37 years Click to show or hide the answer
Czech player: was comforted by the Duchess of Kent when she burst into tears after losing the 1993 women's singles final to Steffi Graf; won in 1998 Click to show or hide the answer
Suspension in 1973 led to the withdrawal of 69 of the 72 ATP members Click to show or hide the answer
Canadian player, beaten in the 2016 final by Andy Murray (seeded 6; beat Federer in the semi–final) Click to show or hide the answer
Junior Girls' Champion, 2008 (born in Australia in 1994, moved to Britain with her family aged 6; acquired British nationality in February 2008) Click to show or hide the answer
Lost three Wimbledon men's singles finals to Roger Federer (2004, 2005, 2009) Click to show or hide the answer
Lost finals to Drobny, 1954 (aged 19) and Connors, 1974 (39) Click to show or hide the answer
US–born, British–based player: won 19 doubles titles (12 women's, 7 mixed), 1914–34; also losing finalist in the singles, four times; died (aged 87) on the day in 1979 when Billie–Jean King broke her record with 6 singles titles, 10 women's doubles and four mixed doubles Click to show or hide the answer
Youngest ever Wimbledon singles champion (men or women) – 2004, 17 years 75 days) Click to show or hide the answer
Lost three finals in 1977, including ladies' singles to Virginia Wade Click to show or hide the answer
US player, fined $63,000 and banned from the following year's tournament after walking off court in a tantrum at Wimbledon 1995 Click to show or hide the answer
Men's singles champion 1920 & 1921, nicknamed 'Big Bill' Click to show or hide the answer
Lost the last all–British singles final (1961) to Angela Mortimer Click to show or hide the answer
Ladies' Singles champion in the Queen's Silver Jubilee year (1977) Click to show or hide the answer
Wimbledon champion with a Maths degree from Sussex University

Players

The 'Four Musketeers' – four French players who dominated men's tennis from around 1924 to 1932, between them winning 20 Grand Slam singles titles and 23 doubles:

Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

Tim Henman's highest ranking on the ATP world tour (on three separate occasions, between 2002 and 2004) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer

Oldest man to be ranked world no. 1 (aged 33, 2003); second (after Laver) to win the Career Slam in the Open era (when he won the French Open in 1999) Click to show or hide the answer
Born in Kiev, 1983; her father was a footballer who played for Ipswich Town, St. Johnstone and Inverness Caledonian Thistle; moved to Ipswich aged 5 and Perth aged 6; highest world ranking 49, in 2010; represented Great Britain in the Fed Cup, 2002–13; retired in November 2013; diagnosed with liver cancer in January 2014; died in May 2014, aged 30 Click to show or hide the answer
Second and last British player to win a French singles title (1976) Click to show or hide the answer
Won the Australian and French opens in 1974, aged 17/18; went on to win 6 French Opens (1974–81) and 4 US Opens (1976–81) as well as 5 consecutive Wimbledons (1976–80) – but only the one Australian Open Click to show or hide the answer
First grand slam winner (1938); then went professional Click to show or hide the answer
Youngest–ever champion of any men's Grand Slam event (French Open, 1989 – 17 yrs 110 days – Boris Becker was 118 days older when he won Wimbledon in 1985) Click to show or hide the answer
Belgian player: US Open champion 2005, 2009, 2010; Australian Open champion 2011; in 2009, became the first mother since 1980 to win a Grand Slam title Click to show or hide the answer
First woman to win the Grand Slam (1953); won every Grand Slam tournament she ever entered, from the US Open in 1951 (aged 16) to Wimbledon 1954 – total 9 (didn't play in the 1954 Australian Open); 2 weeks after Wimbledon 1954 (aged 19), she suffered a riding accident that ended her career Click to show or hide the answer
Men's World No. 1 for a record 160 weeks, 1974–7 Click to show or hide the answer
Second woman to win the Grand Slam (1970); won a record 24 grand slam singles titles, also 19 women's doubles and 14 mixed doubles (62 in all – many of them in the Australian Open, which some say didn't attract a world–class entry in her day) Click to show or hide the answer
Argentinian player: the last non–European to win a Grand Slam men's singles tournament, as of 2017 (won the US Open in 2009) Click to show or hide the answer
Men's World No. 1 for 237 consecutive weeks, 2004–8 (302 weeks altogether, 2004–12) Click to show or hide the answer
Partnered John McEnroe in seven of his nine Grand Slam men's doubles titles (the first four of five at Wimbledon, and the first three of four at the US Open – all spanning the years 1979–84) Click to show or hide the answer
US coach who worked with Andy Murray for 16 months, 2006–7; previously worked with Andre Agassi and Andy Roddick Click to show or hide the answer
Won the "Golden Slam" (4 Grand Slam events plus the Olympics) in 1988 – the only player to do so, until at least 2020 Click to show or hide the answer
Became the youngest man ever to be ranked world no. 1, in 2001 Click to show or hide the answer
Youngest–ever champion of any Grand Slam event, men's or women's (Australian Open, 1997 – 16 yrs 117 days) Click to show or hide the answer
Won a total of 39 Grand Slam titles (including 20 at Wimbledon) between 1961 and 1980 – 12 singles (6 at Wimbledon), 16 women's doubles (10), 11 mixed doubles (4) Click to show or hide the answer
Second and last men's Grand Slam winner, and the only one in the professional era; first man to win the Grand Slam twice (1962, 1969) Click to show or hide the answer
Appeared in 8 consecutive US Open singles finals, 1982–9 – won in 1985, 1986 and 1987; also won the French Open in 1984, 1986 and 1987, and the Australian Open in 1989 and 1990; appeared in two Wimbledon finals, but lost both (to Becker in 1986 and Cash in 1987) Click to show or hide the answer
First British player to win a French singles title (1955) Click to show or hide the answer
2005–7: first since Borg to win three consecutive French Open Men's Singles Click to show or hide the answer
The first men's player to be officially ranked No. 1 (August 1973–June 1974); twice a Wimbledon finalist (1972 and 1976), won the US Open in 1972 and the French Open in 1973 Click to show or hide the answer
First British player to win the US Championships singles (1930) Click to show or hide the answer
First man to win all four Grand Slam events (not in same year) Click to show or hide the answer
Australian player: won the US Open in 1997 and 1998, and lost the Wimbledon finals in 2000 and 2001 Click to show or hide the answer
Wimbledon champion 1939, US Open champion 1939 and 1941; beaten in three straight sets (6–4, 6–3, 6–3) by Billie–Jean King in 1978 in a challenge match that became known as the 'Battle of the Sexes', with a $100,000 'winner–takes–all' prize (he was 55, she was 29) Click to show or hide the answer
US Open Women's Singles champion, 1990: the only player from Argentina to have won a Grand Slam singles title in the open era Click to show or hide the answer
Became the youngest ever Australian women's singles champion, in 1991 (aged 17) Click to show or hide the answer
Israeli–born player, defaulted a rubber against Britain's Kyle Edmund (in which he was already two sets down), while playing for Canada in the 2017 Davis Cup, after inadvertently hitting the umpire (Arnaud Gabas) in the eye with a ball hit away in anger (aged 17) Click to show or hide the answer
Russian: Wimbledon champion 2004 (aged 17), completed the career grand slam in 2012 by winning the French Open; banned for two years in 2016 after testing positive for meldonium Click to show or hide the answer
Partnered Martina Navratilova to 20 of her 29 Women's (or Ladies') Grand Slam Doubles titles, including an actual Grand Slam in 1984 Click to show or hide the answer
Won the first Open women's singles title at the US Championships (1968), five months after turning professional; the only British player to win a US Open singles title, before Andy Murray in 2012 Click to show or hide the answer
Beat Djokovic in the quarter–finals of the Australian Open men's singles in 2014 – his only defeat in this tournament between 2010 and 2016 Click to show or hide the answer

Other

Captain of Britain's Davis–Cup–Winning team in 2015 Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Host city of the 2015 David Cup final Click to show or hide the answer

The British National Championships were held, before being scrapped in 2003, at Click to show or hide the answer
Women's equivalent of the Davis Cup, first held in 1963 Click to show or hide the answer
Women's international competition contested by USA and Great Britain, 1923–90 Click to show or hide the answer
Venue for the US Open, from its foundation in 1968 until 1977 Click to show or hide the answer
Venue for the US Open since 1978 Click to show or hide the answer
Both Forest Hills and Flushing Meadows are in Click to show or hide the answer
Larger, newer court at Flushing Meadows Click to show or hide the answer
Second largest court at Flushing Meadows Click to show or hide the answer
Venue for the Australian Open, since 1988 Click to show or hide the answer
Former name of Melbourne Park (until 1996): (The National Tennis Centre at) Click to show or hide the answer
Venue for the Australian Championships / Open, 1972–87 (previously held in various cities) Click to show or hide the answer
Official name of the French Open: Tournoi de (same name as the venue) Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017