Monkey

Quiz Monkey
What do you want to know?

You are here:

Sport
Which Sport

If you like my website, and/or if you've found it useful, please consider making a small donation to my Just Giving page, which I've set up just for this purpose. To begin with I'm collecting for a charity whose work I have benefitted from myself (and continue to do so): the British Heart Foundation. It would be great to raise £100 in the first month.

If you have already donated ... Thank You!

Which Sport?

See also Trophies.

Played on a gridiron Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Has a 'scrimmage' at the start of every 'down'
The objective is to carry the ball into the opponents' 'end zone'
John Wilson writes and broadcasts on, and was voted in 2004 the greatest ever exponent of Click to show or hide the answer
Toxophily is another name for Click to show or hide the answer
York rounds, Hereford rounds, St. George rounds, Albion rounds, Windsor rounds, Western rounds, American rounds, National rounds, Warwick rounds, Portsmouth rounds, Worcester rounds, Bristol rounds: different forms of competition in
Competitors use tab, bracer, chest guard
'Lady Paramount' is a title given to a female official (typically one who gives the prizes) in
Back Pocket, Forward Pocket, Half Back, Half Forward, Rover, Ruck Rover, Ruckman (the last 3 being Followers): positions in Click to show or hide the answer
6 points for a goal, 1 for a behind
Developed from the traditional game Battledore and Shuttlecock, when soldiers of Britain's Indian army in Poona added a competitive element by introducing a net; originally called Poona, renamed after the Gloucestershire home of the Duke of Beaufort Click to show or hide the answer
Rudi Harton, Tony Jordan, Gillian Gilks and Nora Perry are associated with
Played in England at least as early as 1744; prohibited in the environs of the town meeting house at Pittsfield, Massachusetts in 1791; codified by Alexander Cartwright's "Knickerbocker Rules" of 1842 (which outlawed throwing the ball at a runner to put him out, thus facilitating the use of a smaller, harder ball). The once widely–accepted story that it was first played at Doubleday Field, Cooperstown, New York in 1839 has been proved false Click to show or hide the answer
Played in or on a ballpark, on a diamond
Knuckler, outcurve and fireman are terms used in Click for more information
The world's most widely played indoor sport; devised in 1891 at the International YMCA Training School in Springfield, Massachusetts (now Springfield College) by James Naismith (born Canada 1861); became an Olympic sport for men in 1936 and for women in 1976; described in Encyclopaedia Britannica as "the only major sport strictly of US origin" Click to show or hide the answer
Wilt Chamberlain (1936–99) is considered one of the greatest ever players – scoring a record 100 points in a game, in 1962 – in
Starts with a tip–off
Travelling is an offence in
Steve Redgrave competed for Britain at rowing and (in the world championships, but apparently not the Olympics) Click to show or hide the answer
Started 1976 at Llanwrtyd Wells, Powys; world championships first held there 1985, annually since 1994 Click to show or hide the answer
W. G. Grace captained England at cricket and; David Bryant was a leading competitor, from the mid–1960s to the mid–1990s, in Click to show or hide the answer
Known as "the noble art" Click to show or hide the answer
Women's sport played in Ireland – similar to hurling Click to show or hide the answer
Canadian Pairs is an event in; Eskimo Roll is a technique in Click to show or hide the answer
Governed by FIDE (Federation Internationale des Echecs) Click to show or hide the answer
Julius Caesar (born Godalming, Surrey, 1830) represented England in the 1850s at Click to show or hide the answer
William Webb Ellis won a Blue for Oxford University, at
Billiards was originally modelled on Click to show or hide the answer
Headquarters are at the Hurlingham Club, London
One side has red and yellow balls, the other black and blue
Word missing from the official title of the venue of the Wimbledon tennis championships: 'The All England Lawn Tennis and ... Club' – the sport that the club was originally founded for in 1868
Known as "the Roaring Game" Click to show or hide the answer
The target area is known as the House
A bonspiel is a tournament in
Granites (a.k.a. stones) are used in
The inwick and the outwick are shots in Click for more information
Takes place in a Velodrome; the Keirin and Madison are events in Click to show or hide the answer
Sprinters deliberately go slowly for most of the race, in
Dave Brailsford (born Derby 1964, brought up in Caernarvonshire) is a successful coach of British teams and individuals in
The Iditarod: annual race from Anchorage to Nome, Alaska (promoted as a commemoration of the run to deliver serum, to combat the threat of an epidemic of diphtheria – to which the local Inuit children had no immunity – in 1925) Click to show or hide the answer
William Cavendish, 1st Duke of Newcastle (1592–1676) was a pioneer in the art of manège, which evolved into Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Most important game played annually on St. Andrew's Day (30th November) Click to show or hide the answer
Sports that take place on a piste: skiing, boules, and Click to show or hide the answer
The plastron and the lamé are pieces of equipment used in Click for more information
Type of indoor football – traced back to Uruguay 1930 – first world championships 1989, administered jointly by FIFA and its own association (AMF); name comes from the Portuguese for 'room football' Click to show or hide the answer
Introduced to England by James I (in 1608?), and to the USA by John Reid and the Appletree Gang (1888) Click to show or hide the answer
Stableford and Skins are scoring systems used (occasionally) in
Overlapping and interlocking are alternative grips in
Described by Winston Churchill as "a game conceived by the devil, and played with implements entirely unsuited to the purpose", and (more famously) by Mark Twain as "a good walk spoiled"
Babe Zaharias, Louise Suggs and Patty Berg were the post–war 'big 3' in women's
First event (an unsuccessful experiment) was staged at Hendon, North London, 1876; emerged in the USA in the 1920s (following the invention of the artificial hare in 1912); first meeting in Britain was held at Belle Vue, Manchester in 1926 Click to show or hide the answer
Hall Green Stadium (Birmingham, scheduled for demolition in 2016), Perry Barr Stadium (Birmingham), Belle Vue Stadium (Manchester) and Wimbledon Stadium are venues for
Kip, crossgrasp, pike: terms used in Click to show or hide the answer
Sulky: used in Click to show or hide the answer
Starts with a bully–off; long and short corners, penalty corners and 15–metre (formerly 16–yard) hits are awarded in Click to show or hide the answer
The Kookaburras are the Australian national team in
Octopush is an underwater form of
Goalposts as in rugby, with a net below the bar. Three points for a goal (below the bar), one for above the bar; scores are shown "goals–points" – e.g. "2–15" means two goals and 15 points (total 21) Click to show or hide the answer
Art Ross Trophy: awarded annually to the highest scorer in (NHL – USA/Canada) Click to show or hide the answer
Starts with a face–off
Flying camel, Axel, Lutz, Salkow: seen in Click to show or hide the answer
Form of pelota, popular with gamblers in Florida; said to be the world's fastest ball sport (but see Jason Zuback in Golf) Click to show or hide the answer
Name means "the gentle way" Click to show or hide the answer
Japanese art of swordplay, using a bamboo stave (shinai) Click to show or hide the answer
Mixed (6 men, 6 women) form of basketball, popular in Germany and Holland; Olympic sport 1920 Click to show or hide the answer
Canada's official national sport: first played by native Americans, who knew it as Baggataway; governed by the FIL, which was formed in 2008 when its previously separate men's and women's governing bodies merged; an Olympic sport in 1904 and 1908, and an Olympic demonstration sport in 1928 and 1932 Click to show or hide the answer
The Iroquois Nationals are the only team of Native Americans sanctioned to compete in any sport internationally, and are ranked among the top five in
First played in 1901 at Bergman Osterberg Physical Training College, Dartford, Kent Click to show or hide the answer
Governed (in England) by AENA
Fast5 is a shortened version of
World Cups have been held every four years since 1963; Australia or New Zealand has won every tournament (10 wins and 3 wins respectively, up to 2015), not counting 1979 when they shared it with the hosts Trinidad & Tobago
New Zealand are represented by the Silver Ferns, South Africa by the Proteas, Jamaica by the Sunshine Girls
Celtic Dragons, Hertfordshire Mavericks, Loughborough Lightning, Manchester Thunder, Surrey Storm, Team Bath, Team Northumbria and Yorkshire Jets are leading British teams in
Tracey Neville – sister of Gary and Phil (& daughter of Neville!) represented England at
In 2016, by winning her 129th cap, Jade Clarke became England's most-capped player of all time in
Combines cross–country and map–reading; name invented by Major Ernst Killander for an event in Stockholm in 1918 Click to show or hide the answer
National game of the Basque region: name is Basque for 'ball'; an Olympic sport in 1900 (when only France and Spain entered – Spain won; also an Olympic demonstration sport in 1924, 1968 and 1992 Click to show or hide the answer
Played on a fronton
Originated in Persia; name comes from a Tibetan word for a ball; first played in Britain 1869; largest field of any team sport (i.e. not including golf) Click to show or hide the answer
Hurlingham Club, London, devised the rules for
Guards Club (based at Smith's Lawn, Windsor Great Park), the Royal Berkshire, Cowdray Park (West Sussex) and Cirencester Park (Gloucestershire) are the UK's most prestigious clubs for
Shares its name with a brand of confectionery, a car, and a style of shirt
A combination of squash and handball: invented in 1952 in Greenwich, Connecticut by professional tennis player Joe Sobek Click to show or hide the answer
Similar to real tennis; Olympic sport 1908, Britain swept the medals board in doubles Click to show or hide the answer
Known in France as courte–paume (a reference to the older game of jeu de paume) Click to show or hide the answer
Played on a doubly asymmetric court, featuring a dedans, a tambour and four penthouses
Britain's Penny Lumley, Charlotte Cornwallis and Claire Fahey (née Vigrass) have between them won 13 of the last 14 women's world championships (1989–2015); Australia's Robert Fahey was men's world champion from 1994 to 2016 (winning his 12th consecutive world championship in 2014)
Gabby Yorath represented Wales in the 1990 Commonwealth Games (Auckland) – finishing 8th – at Click to show or hide the answer
Variation of croquet: Olympic sport 1904, when all competitors represented the USA Click to show or hide the answer
Thames Tradesman, Notts County and Leander are leading clubs in Click to show or hide the answer
All Olympic (and World Championship) events are over a straight 2km course Click to show or hide the answer
Founded at the George Hotel, Huddersfield, 29 August 1895 Click to show or hide the answer
Subject of the 1963 film This Sporting Life
Roy Kinnear's father played
The Man of Steel Award – awarded annually since 1977 – honours the outstanding player in
Scottish sport similar to hurling Click to show or hide the answer
Governed in Britain by the BSJA Click to show or hide the answer
360 Varial, Ollie, Nollie and Frontside Air are terms used in Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Telemark and Christy are movements in Click to show or hide the answer
People achieve the fastest speeds, without mechanical assistance, in Click to show or hide the answer
Nordic and Alpine are varieties of Click to show or hide the answer
Sport based on basketball but using trampolines – originated in the USA in 2001 Click to show or hide the answer
Invented around 1875 by British army officers in India; Lt. Col. Sir Neville Chamberlain is credited as the inventor, after he claimed as much in 1938; name was (at the time) army slang for a new recruit Click to show or hide the answer
Competitors change lanes every lap (on the back straight) Click to show or hide the answer
Said to have originated at Harrow School; governed in Britain by the SRA Click to show or hide the answer
Uses the smallest ball (1.56 to 1.59 inches, 39.5 to 40.5 mm) Click for more information
Balls are colour–coded, ranging from yellow (slow) for hot conditions and expert players, to blue (fast) for cold conditions or beginners Click for more information
The court has a tin, a front line and a half court line
The referee carries a small dagger, to indicate that he is prepared to take his own life if he makes a wrong decision Click to show or hide the answer
Hang five, hang ten, layback, Quasimodo, switchfoot, and wipe out are terms used in Click to show or hide the answer
Cook Strait Race and Atlantic City Marathon Click to show or hide the answer
Wigan Wasps is a community–based club, whose aim is to help people to achieve their goals in
FINA is the international governing body of Click to show or hide the answer
Kip, walkabout and fishtail are terms used in Click to show or hide the answer
Originally called Gossima Click to show or hide the answer
Penhold, shakehand and Seemiller (after an American champion of the 1970s and 80s) are grips used in
Uses the lightest ball (2.7 grammes, or 0.095 ounces); also the second smallest, after squash (diameter increased from 38 mm to 40 mm after the 2000 Olympics) Click for more information
Fred Perry was Britain's first world champion (1929) at
Jill Parker represented England a record 413 times, 1967–83, in
Apart from Lawn Tennis, Ann Jones represented Britain at
Name originates either from a town on the Nile (Tinnis), or from the French for "take" (tenez) Click to show or hide the answer
Stanley Matthews Jr. (Stanley John Matthews) was a British Junior champion (the only three–time winner of this title), and represented Great Britain in
John Bercow, Speaker of the House of Commons 2009–, was once the top–ranked British junior, and is a qualified coach, in
Sphairistike (1873) was an early version of Click to show or hide the answer
Developed by George Nissen (USA); first championships 1948; Olympic sport from 2000 Click to show or hide the answer
Adolph, barani, miller, randolph (randy), rudolph (rudy), fliffus, triffus and quadriffus are terms used in
Chrissie Wellington (born Bury St. Edmonds, 1977) was four times world champion (2007, 2008, 2009, 2011 – she missed the 2010 race through illness) in Click to show or hide the answer
Winning contestants move backwards, losers forwards Click to show or hide the answer
Sitting, leaning, climbing, locking, propping and rowing are some of the many types of infringement in
Invented in 1895 by William G. Morgan, who called it Mintonette Click to show or hide the answer
Ralph Hippolyte – born in Haiti, raised in the USA – became English team coach (in the 1990s) in
Spike, dump, dig, block, pass and penetration are terms used in
One team wears blue caps, the other team white, goalkeepers red Click to show or hide the answer
First World Championships held at the Cafe Monico, London, on 28 May 1891 Click to show or hide the answer
Vassily Alexeyev (USSR) broke 80 world records in
Freestyle and Greco–Roman are the two international forms of; there is also a traditional Lancashire style known as 'Catch–as–catch–can' Click to show or hide the answer
Can be characterised as 'heels' (bad guys) against 'faces' (good guys)
Boston crab, Nelson and flying mare are holds or moves in
Beats, reaches and runs are terms used in Click to show or hide the answer
Entered the Concise Oxford English Dictionary in 2001, defined as "a sport in which a participant is secured inside an inner capsule in a large, transparent ball which is then rolled along the ground or down hills"; said to have originated in New Zealand in 1994 Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017