Monkey

Quiz Monkey
What do you want to know?

You are here:

Arts & Entertainment
Arts
Artists

If you like my website, and/or if you've found it useful, please consider making a small donation to my Just Giving page, which I've set up just for this purpose. To begin with I'm collecting for a charity whose work I have benefitted from myself (and continue to do so): the British Heart Foundation. It would be great to raise £100 in the first month.

If you have already donated ... Thank You!

Artists

This page contains things about artists (painters, sculptors, photographers, cartoonists, etc.) that are not directly related to their individual works – including biographical details, and facts about their work as a whole.

For things about individual works (specifically, who painted what), see Painters.

US landscape photographer, 1902–84, particularly known for black–and–white views of the Yosemite valley (California). Developed the "zone system" to heighten the clarity and depth of his photographs Click to show or hide the answer
Artistic consultant on the construction of the Beijing National Stadium (for the 2008 Olympics); a political activist, highly and openly critical of the Chinese Government's stance on democracy and human rights; jailed for 81 days in 2011 for alleged "economic crimes" Click to show or hide the answer
US photographer, 1923–2004: started in fashion (Vogue, Life, Harper's Bazaar) in the 1950s; took iconic psychedelic photos of the Beatles, also the ones included with the "White Album"; Fred Astaire played the character based on him in the 1957 musical film Funny Face, which was based on his early career Click to show or hide the answer
Born Dublin, 1910, of English parents Click to show or hide the answer
Pseudonym of the anonymous graffiti artist believed to be a native of Yate, near Bristol, whose work has appeared on the Israeli West Bank barrier among other places; some believe that he is a Bristolian named Robert Gunningham Click to show or hide the answer
Designed the cover of the Beatles' Sergeant Pepper album Click to show or hide the answer
Belgian painter who bought Van Gogh's The Red Vineyard – the only painting he sold during his lifetime Click to show or hide the answer
Born in a Paris suburb, 1882; associated with Fauvism from 1906, and co–founder of Cubism (with Picasso) 1908 Click to show or hide the answer
Follower of the Pre–Raphaelites, an associate of William Morris, and instrumental in the revival of stained glass art in England in the late 19th century; uncle of both Stanley Baldwin and Rudyard Kipling (his wife was the sister of both their mothers; a fourth sister married the painter Sir Edward Poynter) Click to show or hide the answer
Born 1697; famous for landscapes of Venice and London Click to show or hide the answer
Hungarian–born US war photographer, 1913–54, particularly famous for photos of the Spanish Civil War and the D–Day landings; had an affair with Ingrid Bergman, and rejected her proposal of marriage; killed by a landmine in Vietnam (during the First Indochina War) Click to show or hide the answer
Fled Rome in 1606 after killing a young man in a brawl Click to show or hide the answer
Architect, interior designer, artist, and writer and broadcaster on 20th–century design (1910–99): director of architecture at the Festival of Britain, 1951; illustrated Prince Charles's children's book The Old Man of Lochnagar (1980) Click to show or hide the answer
16th–Century sculptor, engrave and goldsmith;  celebrated autobiography published 150 years after his death;  subject of an opera by Berlioz Click to show or hide the answer
Born Aix–en–Provence, 1839, and died there in 1906; painted several views of the nearby Mont Sainte–Victoire, in the 1880s; often referred to as "the father of modern art" – described in a line attributed to both Matisse and Picasso as "the father of us all" Click to show or hide the answer
Brothers at the forefront of Charles Saatchi's Young British Arts movement; works include Hell, Insult to Injury, and a 3–dimensional realisation of Goya's Disasters of War Click to show or hide the answer
English painter (1907–96): famous for scenes of railways, horses and military action; also the official artist for the Queen's coronation (1953); after 1956, he often included a little mouse in his works (sometimes lifelike, sometimes cartoon–like) Click to show or hide the answer
British painter (1817–86): murdered his father in 1843 Click to show or hide the answer
Promised to eat his wife and muse, Gala, after her death Click to show or hide the answer
Designed the Chupa Chups logo
Wore a diving suit to the opening of the International Surrealist Exhibition, London 1936
Designed a dream sequence for Hitchcock's 1945 film Spellbound
Kept a pet ocelot named Babou (said to be a gift from the Colombian head of state) in the 1960s, and took it everywhere with him, on a leash and stone–studded collar – including a cruise on the SS France
Famous for record sleeves in the 1970s by Yes, etc. (featuring fantasy landscapes) Click to show or hide the answer
Famous for painting ballet dancers and racing scenes Click to show or hide the answer
Works exhibited in New York, 2009, with the title Only God Knows I'm Good Click to show or hide the answer
Dutch graphic artist (1898–1972) whose mathematically inspired works featured tesellation (covering a surface with repeated shapes, with no overlaps or gaps) and impossible perspectives; works include Regular Division of the Plane (1936), Metamorphosis (I, II & III – 1937, 1939–40, 1967–8), Sky and Water (I & II – 1938), Reptiles (1943), Magic Mirror (1946), Drawing Hands (1948), House of Stairs (1951), Relativity (1953), Convex and Concave (1955), Belvedere (1958), Ascending and Descending (1960), Waterfall (1961) Click to show or hide the answer
The first war photographer (Crimea, 1855); founder of RPS London Click to show or hide the answer
Born 1922, in Berlin; came to London with his family in 1933; died in 2011, aged 88 Click to show or hide the answer
Painted a controversial portrait of the Queen (2000–1)
Italain Renaissance painter (1395–1455), beatified by Pope John Paul II in 1982 Click to show or hide the answer
English painter and critic who coined the phrase 'postimpressionism' in the 1900s Click to show or hide the answer
Born Paris 1848; lived in Lima with his half–Peruvian mother between the ages of 4 and 7 (his father died on the westward voyage); became a stockbroker, 1871; married a Danish woman in 1873, and moved to Copenhagen in 1884; returned to Paris 1885 to paint, after his wife asked him to leave. Worked as a labourer on the construction of the Panama Canal, but was sacked after two weeks. Made his home in Tahiti from 1891; died there in 1903 Click to show or hide the answer
The most famous English wood carver: born in Rotterdam in 1648, probably of English parents; moved to Deptford (east London) in 1667; known for his work in England, including Windsor Castle and Hampton Court Palace, St. Paul's Cathedral and other London churches, Petworth House and other country houses, Trinity College Oxford and Trinity College Cambridge; died in 1721 and is buried in St. Paul's, Covent Garden Click to show or hide the answer
Caricaturist and printmaker, 1756–1815: known as the father of the political cartoon, often compared with Hogarth; satirised George III as well as several prime ministers and generals; also glorified John Bull as a way of satirising the French Revolution, and has been described as "the scourge of Napoleon" Click to show or hide the answer
Said to have proved his skill to his master, the painter Cimbaue, by painting a fly on a picture he was working on, and to a sceptical emissary of Pope Benedict XI by drawing circles freehand Click to show or hide the answer
Depicted the Star of Bethlehem, in his Adoration of the Magi, resembling a comet – thought to have been inspired by his observing Halley's Comet in 1301, and leading to the naming of the 1986 space probe to the comet after him
The Black Paintings (1820s, in late life; noted for their intense, haunting themes) Click to show or hide the answer
Influential illustrator of children's books, died of breast cancer in 1901 aged 55 Click to show or hide the answer
English cartoonist and illustrator, 1872–1944: best known for drawings of ridiculously complicated machines for achieving simple objectives Click to show or hide the answer
English painters of Dutch extraction, father (1795–1865) and son (1820–1907), both famous for painting horses; Queen Victoria was a patron of the father Click to show or hide the answer
Designed the sets for Stravinsky's A Rake's Progress at Glyndebourne, 1975; developed a technique he called "photo–montage" Click to show or hide the answer
Instrumental in the Copyright Act, 1735, after copying of his 'dumb shows' Click to show or hide the answer
British sculptress, a friend and associate of Henry Moore; died aged 72 in 1975, in a fire in her St. Ives studio; an art gallery opened in 2011 in her home town of Wakefield, West Yorkshire, was named in her honour Click to show or hide the answer
63–year–old Zanzibar–born winner of the Turner Prize in 2017 – the first year in which it was open to artists aged over 50 Click to show or hide the answer
Court painter to Henry VIII, from 1536 to his death in 1543; commissioned to paint a portrait of Anne of Cleves, which (according to tradition) flattered the subject and helped to persuade Henry to marry her Click to show or hide the answer
Mexican painter, 1907–54, famous for her self–portraits and their intense, vibrant colours. Married to the painter Diego Rivera; Leon Trotsky stayed with them, and had an affair with her, then moved to another house in the same town (Coyoacan) where he was assassinated three years later.  She was largely unrecognised until the 1980s Click to show or hide the answer
Sculptor, born Bombay (Mumbai) 1954, active in Britain from the 1970s; Turner Prize 1991; works include Cloud Gate (Chicago, 2006) and Sky Mirror (Nottingham, 2001, larger version New York 2006). First living British artist to have all the main display space of the Royal Academy devoted to his works (2009). Click to show or hide the answer
British art restorer, 1917–84, claimed to have forged over 2,000 paintings Click to show or hide the answer
US artist, born 1955, famous for representations of everyday objects in unexpected forms – e.g. balloon animals with highly–reflective stainless steel finishes, and the floral dog last seen outside the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao Click to show or hide the answer
Cuban photographer, 1928–2001: took the iconic picture of Che Guevara (on 5 March 1960) Click to show or hide the answer
Appointed First Painter to Louis XVI; decorated the interior of Versailles Click to show or hide the answer
Court painter to Charles II; reputedly asked by Cromwell to paint him "warts and all" Click to show or hide the answer
Born out of wedlock in 1452, in a small hill town in Tuscany, from which his father took his name Click to show or hide the answer
Used 'mirror writing' for many of his working notes; The Leicester Codex, bought by Bill Gates in 1994 for just over $30 million, is one of his notebooks
US pop artist, noted for large scale depictions of comic book panels Click to show or hide the answer
US photographer – Chief Photographer of Rolling Stone magazine (left in 1983): photographed John Lennon on the day he was assassinated Click to show or hide the answer
Born in London in 1875: gave up his career as a naval draughtsman, in 1904, to become "king of the saucy postcard" Click to show or hide the answer
English botanical artist, depicted many exotic species in the Amazon basin in the 1950s Click to show or hide the answer
Born 1893 in Barcelona; now celebrated in a museum on Montjuic, near the Olympic stadium Click to show or hide the answer
Born Livorno (Leghorn) 1884; one–man exhibition in Paris, 1918, closed on its opening day on grounds of indecency; died of tuberculosis 1920, aged 35 Click to show or hide the answer
Lived from 1871–8 at Argenteuil, a village beside the River Seine near Paris, and from 1883 to 1926 (exactly the last half of his 86–year life) at Giverny, Haute–Normandie; made many paintings of both places, particularly his garden at Giverny – many of them featuring lily–ponds, the so–called Japanese Bridge and/or a weeping willow Click to show or hide the answer
English comic–book writer, born 1953 in Northampton, best known for his work in Watchmen (1986–7), V for Vendetta (1988–9) and From Hell (1989–96); often described as "the best graphic novel writer in history" Click to show or hide the answer
English artist and socialist (1834–96), one of the principal founders of the Arts & Crafts Movement; wrote the Utopian socialist novel News from Nowhere (1890); founded the Kelmscott Press in 1891 Click to show or hide the answer
US primitive artist, died 1961 aged 101 Click to show or hide the answer
English painter, 1878–1959: famous for painting horses (including hunting scenes), and an outspoken opponent of modernism Click to show or hide the answer
Surname of brothers Paul (1889–1946) and John (1893–1977), both of whom were commissioned as war artists in both world wars Click to show or hide the answer
Australian; once a professional cyclist; famous for a series of portraits of Ned Kelly Click to show or hide the answer
Born Manchester, 1968; famous for including elephant dung in his works; Turner Prize winner 1998 Click to show or hide the answer
American artist, best known for paintings of enlarged flowers, New York skyscrapers, and New Mexico landscapes: described as "the Mother of American modernism"; died in 1986, aged 98; her painting Red Poppy was used on a US postage stamp in 1996 Click to show or hide the answer
The world's most prolific painter Click to show or hide the answer
Born in 1830 on the island of St Thomas (now in the US Virgin Islands, but then in the Danish West Indies): his importance lies in his contributions to both Impressionism and Post–Impressionism; described as the "dean of the Impressionist painters" Click to show or hide the answer
Abstract impressionist, famous for drip painting; invented "action" painting, 1947; dubbed 'Jack the Dripper' (by Time magazine), 1956; died 1956, aged 44, in a car crash when driving under the influence of alcohol; No. 5, 1948 sold for a world record $140 million, 2006 Click to show or hide the answer
Arthur George Carrick – watercolour Farm Building in Norfolk accepted for exhibition by the Royal Academy, January 2007 – is a pseudonym of Click to show or hide the answer
Born Emmanuel Radnitzky in Philadelphia, 1890; met Marcel Duchamp in New York in 1915, and moved to Paris in 1921; became the unofficial photographer of an influential group of artists and thinkers including Cocteau, Picasso, Joyce and Matisse; contributed to the Dada and Surrealist movements, but had no formal links to either; invented what he called the 'rayograph' – a monochrome image formed by placing objects on light–sensitive paper Click to show or hide the answer
First President of the Royal Academy (1768) – commemorated by a statue in the courtyard of its headquarters, Burlington House (on Piccadilly) Click to show or hide the answer
Popular American artist: most famous for his cover illustrations of everyday life, created for the Saturday Evening Post magazine from 1916 to 1963; awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom – the USA's highest civilian honour – in 1977 Click to show or hide the answer
US painter and TV personality – catchphrase "We don't make mistakes ... just happy little accidents" – died of lymphoma in 1995, aged 52, but later became an Internet celebrity thanks to YouTube, etc. Click to show or hide the answer
Born in Florence, 1856, to American parents; considered "the leading portrait painter of his generation" (Wikipedia); trained in Paris, but moved to London after his Portrait of Madame X (1884) caused a scandal; died London 1925 Click to show or hide the answer
Graphic artist associated with Factory Records – designed sleeves for Joy Division and New Order – also for Roxy Music, Peter Gabriel, Pulp, etc. Click to show or hide the answer
English cartoonist and illustrator (born St. John's Wood, London, 1936): worked with Pink Floyd throughout the 1970s, culminating in The Wall (1979); drew the opening and closing sequences for Yes, Minister and Yes, Prime Minister (from 1980); production designer on Disney's Hercules (1997) Click to show or hide the answer
British painter, born 1931, famous for painting African wildlife and steam locomotives Click to show or hide the answer
Leader of the Camden Town Group (of English post–impressionists): controversially linked with the Jack the Ripper murders by US crime writer Patricia Cornwell in 2002 Click to show or hide the answer
Wife of Dante Gabriel Rossetti: often modelled for him, and other pre–Raphaelites including Holman Hunt and Millais; an important poet and artist in hger own right Click to show or hide the answer
English cartoonist and illustrator (born Wallasey, Merseyside, 1936): best known for his work with US writer Hunter S. Thompson – including Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1971) Click to show or hide the answer
English painter, 1724–1806, best known for painting horses – e.g. Whistlejacket (c. 1762 – National Gallery) Click to show or hide the answer
Venetian painter, c. 1490–1576: gave his name to a brownish–orange colour, which he used to use to paint hair Click to show or hide the answer
Born 1864 in Albi, Pyrenees–Midi region, where there is now a museum dedicated to his works; died 1901 at Chateau Malromé, his family's seat in the Gironde; said to have invented the "earthquake" cocktail, made with "three parts cognac and three parts absinthe" Click to show or hide the answer
Wildlife artist (bird specialist); illustrated Tarka the Otter; born Langley, near Macclesfield, 1901; died on Anglesey in 1975 Click to show or hide the answer
Said to have had himself tied to the mast of a ship so that he could paint a storm Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Born Anna Maria Grosholz in Strasbourg, in 1761; her father died in the Seven Years' War, two months before she was born; her mother became housekeeper to Dr. Philippe Curtius in Bern, Switzerland; he taught her wax modelling; in 1765 they moved to Paris, where Dr. Curtius established a modelling firm; she created her first wax figure, of Voltaire, in 1777; in the 1780s she made portraits of celebrities including Rousseau and Benjamin Franklin, and taught the children of the royal family; arrested during the Reign of Terror as a royalist sympathiser, but instead of being executed she was employed in making waxworks of other victims, including Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette, Marat, and Robespierre; married a civil engineer in 1795; moved to England after the Treaty of Amiens (1802), touring the country with an exhibition of her works; established a permanent exhibition in Baker Street, London, in 1842; died in London in 1850, aged 88 Click to show or hide the answer
Described by Rubens in 1618 as "the best of my pupils" Click to show or hide the answer
Court painter to Charles I of England; sent a triple portrait (full face, left and right profiles) to Bernini as a model for a bust; gave his name to a type of beard, a type of collar, a shade of brown, and a technique used to reproduce that colour in photographs
Worked as an art dealer in London and Paris, and as a schoolmaster in Ramsgate (Kent) and Isleworth (Middlesex) (1880s) Click to show or hide the answer
Dutch art forger, 1889–1947: specialised in imitating the works of Vermeer Click to show or hide the answer
Known by a surname that indicates the city where he was born in 1528 (then the largest possession of Venice on the Italian mainland) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Bass guitarist with Manfred Mann, designed the cover for the Beatles' Revolver album (also played in the Plastic Ono Band, etc.) Click to show or hide the answer
Had a studio called The Factory; shot there by Valerie Solarnis Click to show or hide the answer
Won ¼d (one farthing) libel damages against Ruskin, who accused him of "flinging a pot of paint in the public's face" (in Nocturnes, 1877) Click to show or hide the answer
Lived from the ages of 9 to 13 in Russia, where his father worked on the railways; dismissed from the US Military Academy at West Point, by General Robert E Lee, for persistent rule–breaking
Signed his works with a stylised butterfly motif (originally a monogram)
Autistic child prodigy, born London 1974 of West Indian parents, famous for his detailed freehand drawings of architecture; collected in Drawings, 1987 Click to show or hide the answer
Landscape and portrait painter, 1734–97, particularly associated with Derby Click to show or hide the answer
First woman to win the Turner Prize (1993) Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017–18