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Arts
History of Art

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The Turner Prize
Other

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History of Art

The Turner Prize

First woman to win the Turner Prize (1993) Click to show or hide the answer
1998 winner, for mixed media images that included balls of elephant dung Click to show or hide the answer

Other

This section covers movements, styles, etc. in art.

First Impressionist exhibition – Paris Click to show or hide the answer
First Surrealist exhibition – Paris Click to show or hide the answer
Phrase coined in 1952 by critic Harold Rosenberg to describe the works of Jackson Pollock and others Click to show or hide the answer
Decorative style of the 1920s / 30s, characterised by geometric design and bright metallic surfaces; typified by Radio City Music Hall and the Chrysler Building, both in New York. The name comes from the title of an exposition held in Paris in 1925, but wasn't actually coined until 1968 (by art historian Bevis Hillier) Click to show or hide the answer
1890s: movement associated with Aubrey Beardsley, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Antoni Gaudi, Gustav Klimt, et al Click to show or hide the answer
Elaborately ornamented style that dominated European art and architecture from about 1600 to 1750 Click to show or hide the answer
The Virgin Mary is traditionally represented wearing (colour) Click to show or hide the answer
Picasso, 1901–4: sombre paintings, often of mothers with children, prostitutes and beggars Click to show or hide the answer
Expressionist school formed Dresden 1905 Click to show or hide the answer
English post–impressionist group, 1911–3, led by Walter Sickert Click to show or hide the answer
Founded in 1948 and named from the initial letters of its members' home cities (Copenhagen, Brussels, Amsterdam) Click to show or hide the answer
Early 20th century movement founded by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque; aimed to show that a work of art existed in its own right and not as a representation of the world. Pioneered semi–abstract forms, showing objects as they were known to be and not as they appeared at a particular moment. Has been classified by critics into "analytical" and "synthetic" phases Click to show or hide the answer
"Anti–art" movement, began in Zurich during WWI, peaked 1916–22; led in the USA by Marcel Duchamp (a French refugee) and Man Ray; origin of the name is unclear, but in French it is a child's name for a hobby–horse Click to show or hide the answer
German modern art movement formed as a reaction to Impressionism, divided into 'Blue Rider' and 'The Bridge' Click to show or hide the answer
1905 movement that included Matisse, Maurice de Vlaminck and (briefly) Andre Derain and Georges Rouault Click to show or hide the answer
Decadent French style of the late 19th century Click to show or hide the answer
School founded by Hubert and Jan Van Eyck Click to show or hide the answer
School of US artists including Samuel Morse Click to show or hide the answer
Invented by Alexander Calder in 1932 Click to show or hide the answer
Term coined by French critic Félix Fénéon, to characterise the late–19th century movement led by Georges Seurat and Paul Dignac Click to show or hide the answer
Cornish fishing village: associated with a late–19th century school of landscape artists, and the collectable repoussé copper–work produced by local fishermen during a slump in the fishing trade (in a class set up by master craftsman John Drew MacKenzie, c. 1890–1920) Click to show or hide the answer
Founded in 1803 by John Sell Cotman and John Crome Click to show or hide the answer
Style described as "concerning the interaction between illusion and picture plane, between understanding and seeing"; Bridget Riley (born London 1931) and Victor Vasarely (born Hungary 1906, died Paris 1997) are two of its foremost exponents Click to show or hide the answer
Picasso 1904–6, following the Blue Period: a more cheerful style, often featuring circus artistes, acrobats and harlequins (known in France as saltimbanques) Click to show or hide the answer
Technique of using small distinct points (dots) of primary colours, to give an impression of secondary colours – invented by Georges Seurat Click to show or hide the answer
1950s / 60s reaction to elitism in art: early exponents in Britain were Richard Hamilton, Peter Blake, Eduardo Paolozzi, and in the US Jasper Johns, Jim Dine, Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Claes Oldenburg Click to show or hide the answer
Movement led by Gauguin, Van Gogh, Cezanne and Seurat: name coined by English painter and critic Roger Fry – a member of the Bloomsbury Group – in 1906, and used in the title of an exhibition that he organised in London in 1910 Click to show or hide the answer
Founded in 1848 by William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais and Dante Gabriel Rosetti (later joined by William Michael Rossetti, James Collinson, Frederic George Stephens and Thomas Woolner) Click to show or hide the answer
Developed the 'broken colour' technique Click to show or hide the answer
Style that emerged in France in the early 18th century as a continuation of Baroque; characterized by opulence, grace, playfulness, and lightness Click to show or hide the answer
Dutch movement, founded in 1917, also known as "neoplasticism", seeking "to express a new utopian ideal of spiritual harmony and order"; Piet Mondrian was a leading member Click to show or hide the answer
Founded in 1999 by Billy Childish and Charles Thomson, in opposition to the Charles Saatchi–patronised "Young British Artists" and promoting figurative painting as opposed to conceptual art.  Famously protests outside Tate Britain against the Turner Prize Click to show or hide the answer
Inspired by the exploration of the subconscious; Salvador Dali was a leading exponent; name used originally for literature, coined in 1903 by the French writer Guillaume Apollinaire (the French poet André Breton and the Alsatian poet Yvan Goll both claimed to lead the movement); first applied to painting in 1924 by Joan Miró and Masson; first exhibition held in Paris in 1925 Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017