Monkey

Quiz Monkey
What do you want to know?

You are here:

Arts & Entertainment
Entertainment
Fairy Tales, etc.

On this page:

Monday's Child
Solomon Grundy
I Know an Old Lady
Cock Robin
Dem Bones
Magpies
Writers
Other

If you like my website, and/or if you've found it useful, please consider making a small donation to my Just Giving page, which I've set up just for this purpose. To begin with I'm collecting for a charity whose work I have benefitted from myself (and continue to do so): the British Heart Foundation. It would be great to raise £100 in the first month.

If you have already donated ... Thank You!

Fairy Tales, Nursery Rhymes, Folk Tales, and Folklore

Monday's Child

Monday's child is Click to show or hide the answer
Tuesday's child is Click to show or hide the answer
Wednesday's child is Click to show or hide the answer
Thursday's child has Click to show or hide the answer
Friday's child is Click to show or hide the answer
Saturday's child Click to show or hide the answer
But the child that was born on the Sabbath day is Click to show or hide the answer

Solomon Grundy

Monday Click to show or hide the answer
Tuesday Click to show or hide the answer
Wednesday Click to show or hide the answer
Thursday Click to show or hide the answer
Friday Click to show or hide the answer
Saturday Click to show or hide the answer
Sunday Click to show or hide the answer

I know an old lady who swallowed a ...

Fly(I don't know why)
Spider(that wriggled … inside her)
Bird(how absurd)
Cat(fancy that)
Dog(what a hog)
Cow(I don't know how)
Horse(she died, of course)

Cock Robin

Who killed Cock Robin? Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Who saw him die? Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Who'll dig his grave? Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Who'll toll the bell? Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

(There are other verses ...)

Dem Bones

In order of connectionToe, foot, ankle, leg, knee, thigh, hip, back, neck, head; finger, hand, arm, shoulder

Magpies

There are lots of different versions of this traditional rhyme. This is probably the best–known one – and the one that's given on Wikipedia.

One forTwo for Three forFour for Five for Six for
Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

Seven for Click to show or hide the answer Eight's Click to show or hide the answer

Nine's Click to show or hide the answer Ten's Click to show or hide the answer

Writers (and collectors)

Prolific Danish writer, 1805-75, whose works included scores of fairy tales, published between 1827 and 1872 (some sources say 168, others list over 200) – including The Princess and the Pea (1831), Thumbelina (1835), The Emperor's New Clothes (1837), The Little Mermaid (1837), The Ugly Duckling (1843), The Snow Queen (1844), The Little Match Girl (1845), The Red Shoes (1845) Click to show or hide the answer
Rapunzel, Hansel and Gretel, Cinderella, Little Red Riding Hood, Sleeping Beauty, Snow White, Rumpelstiltskin: among over 200 folk tales collected and published in 1812 by Click to show or hide the answer
French collector and publisher of fairy tales (1628-1703), including Little Red Riding Hood (Le Petit Chaperon Rouge), Cinderella (Cendrillon), Puss in Boots (Le Chat Botté), Sleeping Beauty (La Belle au Bois Dormant), Bluebeard (La Barbe Bleue) Click to show or hide the answer
Goldilocks and the Three Bears: written by Click to show or hide the answer

Other

Sleeping Beauty's name (in Tchaikovsky's ballet and in the Disney film) Click to show or hide the answer
Sleeping Beauty slept for Click to show or hide the answer
The old woman who lived in a shoe fed her children on Click to show or hide the answer
Cannibalistic ogress in Russian folklore Click to show or hide the answer
Monstrous horned goblin–dog of Yorkshire folklore Click to show or hide the answer
Murdered several wives for showing undue curiosity in a locked room Click to show or hide the answer
Giant lumberjack in American folklore: protagonist of various tall tales about his superhuman labours; customarily accompanied by Babe the blue ox Click to show or hide the answer
Believed the sky was falling when an acorn fell on his head (title character of a traditional folk tale) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Daughter of Baron Hardup Click to show or hide the answer
Holger Dansk is the national hero of Click to show or hide the answer
Lucy Lockett's lost pocket was found by Click to show or hide the answer
Left a trail of breadcrumbs so that they could find their way home Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional English pantomime: Columbine's lover (both are invisible to mortal eyes) Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional English story, features a cow called Milky-White Click to show or hide the answer
Subject of Dublin's unofficial anthem (probably of Music Hall origin, possibly based on an earlier folk song) – commemorated by a statue in Grafton Street, unveiled 1988 and commemorated on 13 June (the day on which someone of this name died in 1699 – although there is no evidence that the song is based on a real person); statue known locally as "the Tart with the Cart" Click to show or hide the answer
Pease Pudding Hot (or Pease Porridge Hot): age of the pudding (or porridge) Click to show or hide the answer
How much money did Simple Simon have? Click to show or hide the answer
Magic words first used in the story of Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves – from the Thousand and One Nights (Arabian Nights) – opens the mouth of a cave in which the forty thieves have hidden a treasure Click to show or hide the answer
In Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son, the only tune that Tom could play was Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Fairy tale collected and published by Charles Perrault: the youngest son of a miller inherits nothing but a talking cat, but the cat wins a princess's hand in marriage for his master, by convincing the King that he (the master) is the Marquis de Carabas Click to show or hide the answer
Owner of the grey mare that Old Uncle Tom Cobleigh and his companions took to Widdecombe Fair (in the popular folk song) Click to show or hide the answer
Said to have inspired the nursery rhyme Ring a ring o'roses Click to show or hide the answer
Dwarf who offered to help a miller's daughter spin straw into gold; Tom Tit Tot is the title character of an English version Click to show or hide the answer
Girl imprisoned in a tower, who let down her long hair for her prince to climb up Click to show or hide the answer
Tree associated with magic and witchcraft – said to be the one from which the Devil hanged his mother – used for druids' staffs, dowsing, magic wands, etc. etc. Click to show or hide the answer
Went to sea with silver buckles on his knee (according to a Northumbrian folk song) Click to show or hide the answer
Leprechaun's occupation Click to show or hide the answer
Black Peter (Zwarte Piet): black–faced companion, in Holland, to Click to show or hide the answer
Nursery rhyme character who could eat no fat (his wife could eat no lean) Click to show or hide the answer
Sennachie (Ireland, Scotland) Click to show or hide the answer
How many men did the Grand Old Duke of York have? Click to show or hide the answer
Little girl found inside the petals of a flower (in a story by Hans Christian Andersen) Click to show or hide the answer
Ran upstairs and downstairs in his night–gown Click to show or hide the answer
Old Uncle Tom Cobleigh and his companions (see Sets), in the popular folk song, were going to Click to show or hide the answer
Aladdin's mother: runs a Chinese laundry in Peking Click to show or hide the answer
Common name for ignis fatuus Click to show or hide the answer
Aladdin's brother, who works in the laundry Click to show or hide the answer
On Ilkley Moor ba'ht 'at: "ba'ht 'at" means Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017