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Radio

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History
Stations
Theme Tunes
The Archers
Mrs. Dale's Diary
Desert Island Discs
The Goon Show
Round the Horne
The Shipping Forecast
People
Programmes
Other

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Radio

History

The BBC first began broadcasting regular weather forecasts Click to show or hide the answer
Alistair Cooke's Letter from America first broadcast Click to show or hide the answer
The Archers first broadcast (pilot series, Midlands only) Click to show or hide the answer
The Archers first transmitted across the UK Click to show or hide the answer
The first Goon Show Click to show or hide the answer
Radio 1 launched – and the Light Programme, Third Programme and Home Service became Radios 2, 3 and 4 (respectively) Click to show or hide the answer
Last episode of Mrs. Dale's Diary Click to show or hide the answer
BBC Radio 5 launched Click to show or hide the answer
BBC Radio 5 replaced by 5 Live Click to show or hide the answer
BBC Radio 6 Music (known until 2011 as BBC 6 Music) launched Click to show or hide the answer

Stations

Self–styled "Station of the Stars" – first broadcast to the UK in 1933, broadcast on 208 metres (Medium Wave); finally closed 1992 Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's first pirate radio station: founded by Georgie Fame's manager, Ronan O'Rahilly (because he couldn't get Fame's records played on the BBC or Luxembourg); began broadcasting from 3 miles off Felixstowe, Suffolk, March 1964; from July 1964, two ships, off Frinton–on–Sea, Essex, and the Isle of Man.  Named after the daughter of John F. Kennedy (because O'Rahilly saw a photograph of her playing in the Oval Office – she was disrupting the process of government); still broadcasting (2015) via satellite and the Internet Click to show or hide the answer
Began broadcasting from off Frinton–on–Sea, Essex, December 1964; closed August 1967 Click to show or hide the answer
The first commercial radio station based on mainland Britain (8 Oct 1973) Click to show or hide the answer
The second commercial radio station based on mainland Britain (16 October 1973) Click to show or hide the answer
The BBC's first local radio station (8 November 1967) Click to show or hide the answer
The BBC's second local radio station (15 November 1967); city also served since 1974 by the independent station Hallam FM Click to show or hide the answer
Former names (before 1967):Radio 2 Click to show or hide the answer
Radio 3 Click to show or hide the answer
Radio 4 Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's first (legal) national commercial station – opened in 1992; broadcasts on 99.9–101.9 MHz Click to show or hide the answer
Opened in 1993, owned by Chris Evans from 1997 to 2000; broadcasts on 1215 metres Click to show or hide the answer
Virgin Radio was renamed in 2008 Click to show or hide the answer
Opened in 1995 as Talk Radio UK; broadcasts on 1053 and 1089 metres; relaunched in 2000 as Click to show or hide the answer
First broadcast in 2002 as BBC7 (name changed in 2011) Click to show or hide the answer

Theme Tunes

Barwick Green ("maypole dance" from the 1924 suite My Native Heath, by Arthur Wood – named after Barwick–in–Elmet, near Leeds, West Yorkshire): theme tune of Click to show or hide the answer
Theme tune is an extract from the 4th movement of Mozart's serenade Eine kleine Nachtmusik Click to show or hide the answer
Puffing Billy: theme tune of Click to show or hide the answer
By the Sleepy Lagoon (Eric Coates): theme tune of Click to show or hide the answer
Devil's Galop (sic) (composer Charles Williams):theme tune to Click to show or hide the answer
In Party Mood: theme tune of Click to show or hide the answer
The Knightsbridge March (Eric Coates): theme tune of Click to show or hide the answer
Chopin's Minute Waltz is the theme tune of Click to show or hide the answer
Out of the Blue: theme tune to Click to show or hide the answer
With a song in my heart: theme tune of Click to show or hide the answer

The Archers

Princess Margaret, Duke of Westminster, Britt Ekland, Anneka Rice and Camilla Parker–Bowles (Duchess of Cornwall) have all appeared in Click to show or hide the answer
Fictional county in which based Click to show or hide the answer
Village in which set Click to show or hide the answer
Village pub Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional beer served in the Bull Click to show or hide the answer
Real village, in Worcestershire, said to be the model for Ambridge (particularly the Bull) Click to show or hide the answer
Saint to whom Ambridge's parish church is dedicated Click to show or hide the answer
Farm run successively by Dan, Phil and David Archer (the last in partnership with his wife Ruth) Click to show or hide the answer
Farm run by Tony Archer (son of Peggy, cousin of David) and his wife Pat – organic since 1984 Click to show or hide the answer
Farm run by Joe Grundy and his son Eddie, until their eviction in 2000; now owned by Oliver Sterling, and managed by Eddie's son Ed Click to show or hide the answer
Ambridge's largest farm: run by Brian Aldridge, husband of Jennifer (née Archer) Click to show or hide the answer
Ambridge's country house hotel, sold by Jack Woolley to Caroline and Oliver Sterling (same name as the country estate owned by US president Grover Cleveland!) Click to show or hide the answer
Played by Norman Painting, from the first trial series (1950) until his death in 2009 (character died in 2010) Click to show or hide the answer
Phil's mother, played by Gwen Berriman for 30 years (character died in 1980) Click to show or hide the answer
Phil's father; played by four different actors; died in 1986 trying to rescue a sheep Click to show or hide the answer
Phil's first wife: died in 1955 in BBC Radio's dramatic ploy to distract attention from the launch of ITV Click to show or hide the answer
Played three roles, most famously Julia Pargetter; died in 2005 Click to show or hide the answer
Played by Graham Seed; died in a fall from the roof of his stately home, Lower Loxley, during the 60th anniversary episode (2 January 2011) Click to show or hide the answer
Found not guilty of the attempted murder of her husband Rob, in 2016, in an hour–long special where the jurors included Nigel Havers, Catherine Tate and Dame Eileen Atkins (born an Archer; married name ...) Click to show or hide the answer
Brothers Toby and Rex, rivals for the affections of Pip Archer: grandsons of George, who owned land in Ambridge in the 1950s and was Grace Archer's first husband; their father Robin had an affair with Elizabeth Archer in 1987; after their goose–egg business failed due to Toby's fecklessness, he started making gin at Rickyard Cottage (on Brookfield land) Click to show or hide the answer
Principled and somewhat stubborn pigman at Bridge Farm: built his house, Ambridge View, with the aid of a loan from his boss, Tom Archer; chairman of the parish council, and bellringing tower captain at St. Stephen's; his wife Susan went to prison for harbouring her brother Clive Horrobin; daughter Emma left Will Grundy for his brother Ed, then married Ed; son Chris(topher) became a farrier and married Alice Aldridge Click to show or hide the answer
Runs Bridge Farm with his wife Pat; played since 2014 by David Troughton, son of the second Doctor Who; most likely to say "My back's killing me, but I've got to press on with the leeks" Click to show or hide the answer

Mrs. Dale's Diary

"I'm rather worried about Jim" – typical (much–parodied) extract from Click to show or hide the answer
Mrs. Dale was played (1963–9) by Click to show or hide the answer
The original Mrs. Dale (1948–63) Click to show or hide the answer
Occupation of Mrs' Dale's husband Jim Click to show or hide the answer
Fictional London suburb in which the Dales lived (and Dr. Dale practised) Click to show or hide the answer

Desert Island Discs

Desert Island Discs was devised, and presented from 1942 until his death in 1985, by Click to show or hide the answer
Number of discs that a castaway is allowed Click to show or hide the answer
Books already on the Island: The Bible, and the complete works of Click to show or hide the answer
The first guest (29 January 1942): actor and comedian Click to show or hide the answer
German soprano: chose seven of her own recordings, in 1958; died in 2006, aged 90 Click to show or hide the answer
Replaced Roy Plomley as presenter (1985–8) Click to show or hide the answer
Third presenter (1988–2006) Click to show or hide the answer
Replaced Sue Lawley as presenter in 2006 Click to show or hide the answer
Kirsty Young's first guest (children's book illustrator) Click to show or hide the answer
The most popular luxury (chosen 189 times in the first 3,000 episodes – up to November 2014) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Guest on the 75th anniversary edition (29 January 2017) Click to show or hide the answer

The Goon show

The Goons were(died in 1980, aged 55) Click to show or hide the answer
(died in 2001, aged 79) Click to show or hide the answer
(died in 2002, aged 83) Click to show or hide the answer
The fourth Goon (died in 1996, aged 74) Click to show or hide the answer
Collaborated with Milligan on the Goon Show scripts – sometimes called "the fifth Goon"; died in 2012, aged 89 Click to show or hide the answer
Title of the first series (1951) Click to show or hide the answer
Often the central character, falling foul of Grytpype–Thynne and Moriarty – the only principal character played by Secombe Click to show or hide the answer
The smooth–talking principal villain (played by Sellers) Click to show or hide the answer
Grytpype–Thynne's partner in crime, played by Milligan Click to show or hide the answer
Squeaky–voiced boy scout from East Finchley – played by Sellers Click to show or hide the answer
Bluebottle's incredibly stupid accomplice – played by Milligan Click to show or hide the answer
Doddering, senile old codgers ... Played by Milligan Click to show or hide the answer
Played by Sellers Click to show or hide the answer
Military idiot, noted for his cowardice and monetary irregularities – played by Sellers Click to show or hide the answer

Round the Horne (1965–8)

Principal writers Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer
Previous series, also starring Kenneth Horne and written by Barry Took Click to show or hide the answer
Regular female contributor – played Dame Celia Molestrangler – died in 1998, aged 79 Click to show or hide the answer
Rambling Sid Rumpo was played by Click to show or hide the answer
Kenneth Williams was Sandy; his friend Julian was played by Click to show or hide the answer

The Shipping Forecast

Precise time of the late night Shipping Forecast on Radio 4 Click to show or hide the answer
Tune that precedes it (composed by Ronald Binge) Click to show or hide the answer
Number of shipping areas Click to show or hide the answer

The shipping areas are, in the order in which they're covered in the forecast:

Viking, North Utsire, South Utsire, Forties, Cromarty, Forth, Tyne, Dogger, Fisher, German Bight, Humber, Thames, Dover, Wight, Portland, Plymouth, Biscay, Trafalgar, FitzRoy, Sole, Lundy, Fastnet, Irish Sea, Shannon, Rockall, Malin, Hebrides, Bailey, Fair Isle, Faeroes, South–East Iceland

Essentially, the forecast starts in the north–east and works its way clockwise around the British Isles.

For more details of the areas referred to in the Shipping Forecast, see Earth Sciences.

People

Original presenter of Radio 4's Start the Week (1970–87) Click to show or hide the answer
First female presenter of BBC Radio 1's Breakfast programme (1997–2000 – co–hosting with Kevin Greening 1997–8) Click to show or hide the answer
First person to present programmes on all five BBC radio networks. Most famous for Our Tune Click to show or hide the answer
Provided commentaries on BBC radio for the funerals of King George VI and Winston Churchill, and for the coronation of Elizabeth II Click to show or hide the answer
First DJ on Radio 1 Click to show or hide the answer
Popular presenter of TalkSport's breakfast show – former footballer (over 200 appearances for Ipswich Town, 13 caps for Scotland) Click to show or hide the answer
BBC Radio's racing correspondent, 1959–2001 – the BBC's first specialist correspondent in any sport Click to show or hide the answer
Presenter of BBC Radio 2's mid–morning show – including the daily pop music quiz PopMaster – since 1992 Click to show or hide the answer
Impersonated Ken Bruce for the whole two and a half hours of his Radio 2 morning show, on April Fools' Day 2011 Click to show or hide the answer
Presenter of the BBC Radio 4 live discussion programme The Moral Maze (since 1990) Click to show or hide the answer
Presenter of In the Psychiatrist's Chair (Radio 4): died in 2007, aged 64 Click to show or hide the answer
Letter from America (1946–2004): presenter (died in 2004, aged 95) Click to show or hide the answer
Replaced Humphrey Lyttelton as presenter of I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue, following the latter's death in 2008 (after one series in which he took turns with Stephen Fry and Rob Brydon) Click to show or hide the answer

Brain of Britain: presenters1967–72 Click to show or hide the answer
1972–2003 Click to show or hide the answer
2004 Click to show or hide the answer
2005–6 Click to show or hide the answer
2007 Click to show or hide the answer
2008 Click to show or hide the answer
2009– Click to show or hide the answer

Replaced Terry Wogan in 2009 as the presenter of BBC Radio 2's Breakfast Show Click to show or hide the answer
Scorer and statistician on BBC Test Match Special, from 1966 until his death in 2009 (aged 69) from legionnaires' disease; nicknamed "the Bearded Wonder" or "Bearders" Click to show or hide the answer
Made his name on Radio 1 (from 1973); joined Radio 2 in 1998; briefly presented The Morning Collection on Radio 3 and Kaleidoscope on Radio 4; then went to Classic FM; presenter of Counterpoint on Radio 4, from 2008 Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Left BBC Radio 5 Live in 2007, after 13 years, to succeed Martha Kearney as the principal presenter of BBC Radio 4's Woman's Hour (married to Adrian Chiles, 1998–2009) Click to show or hide the answer
Read the football results on BBC Sports Report, 1972–2013 – on Radio 2 until 1990, then on Radio 5 / 5 Live; died in 2014, aged 78, from throat cancer Click to show or hide the answer
Former Radio 4 continuity announcer, replaced James Alexander Gordon as reader of the football results on BBC Sports Report (Radio 5 Live) on his retirement in 2013 Click to show or hide the answer
David Jacobs' predecessor as presenter of Any Questions? Click to show or hide the answer
Star of ITMA Click to show or hide the answer
First actor to play James Bond (in Moonraker, on radio in South Africa) Click to show or hide the answer
Took over from Peter Bromley in 2001 as BBC Radio's racing correspondent Click to show or hide the answer
Chairman of I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue, from its inception in 1972 until his death in 2008 Click to show or hide the answer
Presenter of Children's Hour 1933–50, Children's Favourites 1954–65 Click to show or hide the answer
Radio 1's first regular female DJ – and its longest–serving presenter, after the death of John Peel Click to show or hide the answer

The News Quiz: chairpersons 1977–? Click to show or hide the answer
?–1995 Click to show or hide the answer
1995–2006 Click to show or hide the answer
2006–15 Click to show or hide the answer
2015– Click to show or hide the answer

Link man on I'm Sorry I'll Read That Again; chairman of Just a Minute Click to show or hide the answer
Last survivor of the original Radio 1 DJs; presented Home Truths on Radio 4 (from 1998); died suddenly from a heart attack in 2004, aged 65, while on a working holiday at moderate altitude in Peru Click to show or hide the answer
Succeeded Henry Kelly as the regular presenter of Midweek (Radio 4) Click to show or hide the answer
Chairman of My Music (Radio 4) Click to show or hide the answer
Presenter of Radio 4's Today Programme from 1975 until his death in 1994 Click to show or hide the answer
Presenter of Loose Ends and Counterpoint (both Radio 4) Click to show or hide the answer
Presenter of Mastermind on Radio 4 (1998–2000) Click to show or hide the answer
Tim Smith and Janey Lee Grace are co–presenters (on Radio 2) with Click to show or hide the answer

Programmes

1940s series in which Arthur Askey first came to fame Click to show or hide the answer
Began as part of What Do You Know? in 1953; gradually took over the show, becoming a show in its own right in 1967; originally known as Ask Me Another Click to show or hide the answer
BBC Radio 4 sitcom about a group of social workers, based on a Guardian comic strip by Harry Venning: stars Sally Phillips in the title role Click to show or hide the answer
BBC Radio 4 music quiz: presented by Ned Sherrin 1986–2007, Edward Seckerson 2007, Paul Gambaccini from 2008 Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Radio 4, 2000–7, revived in 2014 (also on BBC2 TV, 2002–7): comedy impressions show, starring Jon Culshaw, Jan Ravens et al Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Radio 4's long–running magazine programme for disabled people Click to show or hide the answer
Devised by Franklin Engelman, also associated with Brian Johnston Click to show or hide the answer
Radio 4's investigative programme, presented by John Waite Click to show or hide the answer
Radio 4 programme created in 1979 by Derek Cooper; latterly presented by Sheila Dillon Click to show or hide the answer
BBC Home Service / Radio 4, first broadcast in 1947: past chairmen have included Franklin Engleman, Michael Barratt, Steve Race and (most recently) Eric Robson; panellists have included Bill Sowerbutts, Dr Stefan Buczacki (boo–CHAT–ski), Clay Jones and Geoffrey Smith Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
BBC Radio 4 biography series: presented by Joan Bakwell in 2001, Humphrey Carpenter 2002–4, Francine Stock 2005–6, Matthew Parris from 2006 Click to show or hide the answer
Presented by Wilfred Pickles; catchphrases "How do, how are yer?", "Are yer courting?", "What's on the table, Mabel?" "Give him the money, Barney" (Mabel was Pickles' wife) Click to show or hide the answer
Radio comedy sketch show, 1964–73, featuring John Cleese, Tim Brooke–Taylor, Graeme Garden, Bill Oddie, Nicholas Parsons, etc. Click to show or hide the answer
BBC radio comedy programme, 1939–49: title inspired by a Daily Express headline of May 1939, referring to Hitler; followed the adventures of Tommy Handley as he undertook a series of bizarre (fictional) jobs; catchphrases "After you Claude – No, after you Cecil", "Can I do you now, Sir?" Click to show or hide the answer
Long–running Radio 4 panel game show (first broadcast 1967): contestants try to speak for 60 seconds on a given subject, without hesitation, repetition or deviation Click to show or hide the answer
Radio 4's 'obituaries' programme: broadcast at 16:00 on Fridays (and repeated at 21:30 on Sundays) Click to show or hide the answer
The longest–running speech radio programme in history (1946–2004) Click to show or hide the answer
BBC radio sitcom, 1951–61: featured the real family of ex–Hollywood actress Bebe Daniels, with her husband Ben and children Richard and Barbara. Also on TV 1955–61 (first series on BBC, then ITV) and films in 1954 and 1955 Click to show or hide the answer
BBC Radio 4: produced by the BBC and the British Library in partnership, starting in 2012: "collecting intimate conversations between friends or relatives, to build a unique picture of our lives today"; presented by Fi Glover Click to show or hide the answer
1950–85: "Are you sitting comfortably? Then I'll begin ... " were the opening words to Click to show or hide the answer
Radio 1 topical comedy sketch show, 1989–90 – featuring David Baddiel, Rob Newman, Steve Punt, Hugh Dennis; also on BBC2 TV, 1990–2 Click to show or hide the answer
Radio 4 comedy sketch show, 1985–92: written by and featuring Nick Revell and Andy Hamilton: Harry Enfield also appeared occasionally Click to show or hide the answer
BBC radio sitcom, 1959–77, starring Jon Pertwee as Chief Petty Officer Pertwee ("Ev'rybody down!") and Leslie Phillips as Sub Lieutenant Phillips: ("Corrrrr", "Ooh, nasty...", "Oh lumme!", and "Left hand down a bit") Click to show or hide the answer
Radio 2 topical comedy sketch show, 1975–2001 Click to show or hide the answer
Radio 4 sitcom, first broadcast in 1995, written by Andy Hamilton and starring him as the Devil.  Mainly set in Hell.  Also stars Jimmy Mulville as Thomas Click to show or hide the answer
The longest–running quiz on British radio (broadcast on the Home Service / Radio 4, since 1947): presented for many years, until his death in 1996, by Gordon Clough, then by Nick Clarke until his death in 2006, and since 2007 by Tom Sutcliffe; previous hosts include Gilbert Harding and Roy Plomley; contestants have included Irene Thomas, John Julius Norwich, Fred Housego and Val McDermid Click to show or hide the answer
BBC Radio comedy programme, 1965–8: Hugh Paddick and Kenneth Williams played Julian and Sandy, two camp friends who spoke the gay slang Polari Click to show or hide the answer
Influential BBC comedy show, 1948–60, written by Frank Muir and Dennis Norden, starring Jimmy Edwards and later June Whitfield; introduced The Glums Click to show or hide the answer
Orson Wells production that caused panic in the USA in 1939 Click to show or hide the answer
Radio 4 satirical sketch show, 1970–98 Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's longest–running radio series (1926–98) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
First broadcast in 1946; described as 'a daily programme of music, advice and entertainment for the home' Click to show or hide the answer

Other

Two–word piece of advice on the cover of The Hitch–Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy, according to the original radio series (although it didn't appear when the adaptation was published as an actual book); became the catchphrase or slogan of the series Click to show or hide the answer
First record played on Radio 1 Click to show or hide the answer
BBC World Service: funded by a grant from the Click to show or hide the answer
Regular sketch series from Take it from Here: featured June Whitfield as Eth, and Jimmy Edwards as the father of her gormless fiancé, Ron (typical dialogue: "Oh, Ron" ... "Yes, Eth?") Click to show or hide the answer
Read in its entirety in an 8½–hour broadcast on Radio 4, Boxing Day 2000 (because the author refused to let it be serialised) Click to show or hide the answer
Arthur Fallowfield – Kenneth Williams's 'country character' in Beyond Our Ken (BBC Light Programme, 1958–64): catchphrase "Well I think the answer lies ... " Click to show or hide the answer
First record played on Virgin 1215: Born to be Wild, by Click to show or hide the answer
Village in Dylan Thomas's radio play Under Milk Wood Click to show or hide the answer
Name of the charlady in ITMA – played by Dorothy Summers; catchphrase "Can I do you now, Sir?" Click to show or hide the answer
RAJAR measures Click to show or hide the answer
Sponsor of the UK's Radio Academy Awards Click to show or hide the answer
Name of the ship in The Navy Lark Click to show or hide the answer
Bessie Bighead, Organ Morgan, Willy Nilly and Lily Smalls are characters in Click to show or hide the answer
Detective played on BBC Radio 4 by Kathleen Turner, and in the unsuccessful 1991 film version Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017–18