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Literature
Children's: Specifics

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Narnia
Peter Pan
Winnie–the–Pooh
Beatrix Potter
Other

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Children's Literature: Titles and Characters

These are questions where the title (or the name of a leading character) is the answer, so to mention the author and/or title in the "question", as we do in Children's Literature – General, would give it away.

The Chronicles of Narnia

The following table lists the seven books in the order of publication. The second column shows the years of publication, and the third shows the publisher's "suggested reading order". The reason for the difference is that The Magician's Nephew is what's known nowadays as a prequel, and The Horse and his Boy doesn't really fit in to any chronological sequence.

Wikipedia quotes Lewis, the author, writing to a young fan: "When I wrote The Lion I did not know I was going to write any more. Then I wrote P. Caspian as a sequel and still didn't think there would be any more, and when I had done The Voyage I felt quite sure it would be the last, but I found I was wrong."

In truth, having read them in the "suggested reading order", I'm not convinced. You can't (in my opinion) read The Magician's Nephew without itching to get on with the Narnia story; and having read The Lion, you can't read The Horse and his Boy (which has very little to do with any of the other stories) without itching to get back to Narnia. My advice (for what it's worth) is to read them in publication order – but just read numbers 1 and 3 whenever you feel like it.

Click to show or hide the answer 19502
Click to show or hide the answer 19514
Click to show or hide the answer 19525
Click to show or hide the answer 19536
Click to show or hide the answer 19543
Click to show or hide the answer 19551
Click to show or hide the answer 19567

Name of the White Witch Click to show or hide the answer

Peter Pan

1902 adult novel, in which Peter Pan first appeared Click to show or hide the answer
Play premiered on 27 December 1904 Click to show or hide the answer
"To die will be an awfully big adventure" Click to show or hide the answer
1906 republication of the relevant chapters from The Little White Bird, illustrated by Arthur Rackham Click to show or hide the answer
1911 novel based on the play: first line "All children, except one, grow up." Click to show or hide the answer
"She asked where he lived. 'Second to the right,' said Peter, 'and then straight on till morning.'" Click for more information
"You see, Wendy, when the first baby laughed for the first time, its laugh broke into a thousand pieces, and they all went skipping about, and that was the beginning of fairies."
Tedious talk this, but being a stay–at–home she liked it.
"And so," he went on good–naturedly, "there ought to be one fairy for every boy and girl."
"Ought to be? Isn't there?"
"No. You see children know such a lot now, they soon don't believe in fairies, and every time a child says, 'I don't believe in fairies,' there is a fairy somewhere that falls down dead."
"When a new baby laughs for the first time a new fairy is born, and as there are always new babies there are always new fairies." Click for more information

Winnie–the–Pooh

Lives with his friends in the Hundred Acre Wood Click to show or hide the answer
Collective title of the second volume of Winnie–the–Pooh stories, published in 1928 Click to show or hide the answer
Character for whom the House at Pooh Corner was built Click to show or hide the answer
Character who arrives in the Hundred Acre Wood in the second story in The House at Pooh Corner, "and [according to the title of the story] has breakfast" Click to show or hide the answer

Beatrix Potter

"What type of creature is (or was) Beatrix Potter's ... " is a popular style of question. Many of them (e.g. Squirrel Nutkin, from the second tale) are given away in the titles; here are some that aren't.

Mrs. Tiggy–Winkle Click to show or hide the answer
Mr. Jeremy Fisher Click to show or hide the answer
Miss Moppet Click to show or hide the answer
Samuel Whiskers Click to show or hide the answer
Ginger (in The Tale of Ginger and Pickles, 1909) Click to show or hide the answer
Pickles (in The Tale of Ginger and Pickles, 1909) Click to show or hide the answer
Timmy Tiptoes Click to show or hide the answer
Mr. Tod Click to show or hide the answer
Appley Dapply, Cecily Parsley ('presenters' of nursery rhymes, in two collections – 1917 and 1922) Click to show or hide the answer

Loses his tail in a fight with the owl Old Brown, in Beatrix Potter's second book (1903) Click to show or hide the answer

Other

Sequel to Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (Roald Dahl) Click to show or hide the answer

Down the Rabbit Hole is the title of the first chapter of Click to show or hide the answer
Teenage criminal mastermind created by Eoin Colfer (series, 2001–) Click to show or hide the answer
First appeared in French, in a book published in 1931; wife Celeste, children Pom, Flora, Alexander and Isabelle; subject of a Canadian animated television series, 1989–91; also the subject of an orchestral piece by Francois Poulenc (1940) Click to show or hide the answer
Title character eats only snozzcumbers Click to show or hide the answer
First appeared in 1932 in a story called The White Fokker; had associates called Ginger Hebblethwaite and Algy (the Hon. Algernon) Lacey (his cousin) Click to show or hide the answer
Full title (after the initial, familiar shortened form) reads: … His grooms and companions … The Autobiography of a Horse … Translated from the original Equine Click to show or hide the answer
Arrietty, Homily and Pod Click to show or hide the answer
Little helicopter created by the Duchess of York Click to show or hide the answer
"The Fat Owl of the Remove" Click to show or hide the answer
Bob Cherry, Frank Nugent and Harry Wharton were schoolfellows of
Thing One and Thing Two are the mischievous companions of (Dr. Seuss character) Click to show or hide the answer
Hilaire Belloc's 1907 collection of verses, including Jim, Who ran away from his Nurse, and was eaten by a Lion, Henry King, Who chewed bits of string, and was early cut off in Dreadful Agonies, Matilda, Who told Lies, and was Burned to Death Click to show or hide the answer
1952 novel by E. B. White, about a pig called Wilbur who makes friends with a barn spider Click to show or hide the answer
Tommy Stubbins (a local boy), Matthew Mugg the Cat's–meat–man, Prince Bumpo, Polynesia the parrot, Gub–Gub the pig, Jip the dog, Chee–Chee the monkey, Dab–Dab the duck, Too–Too the owl, and the Pushmi–Pullyu (a two–headed gazelle–unicorn cross – llama in the film): associates and pets of Click to show or hide the answer
Walter Boggis, Nathan Bunce and Franklin Bean are poultry farmers in (Roald Dahl story) Click to show or hide the answer
Weird creatures created by Ricky Gervais, including the Honk, the Grundit, the Puddloflaj and the Mernimbler Click to show or hide the answer
Character in children's literature, has a wife called Mildew and a son called Mould Click to show or hide the answer
Roald Dahl story about a small boy who is left alone with his nasty grandmother and makes her an extra–special concoction; Grandma grows so big that her head breaks through the roof of the house Click to show or hide the answer
Classic 1999 children's story by Julia Donaldson, about a mouse that outwits a fox, an owl and a snake by telling them about a monster that is its friend, which it thinks it has made up – but then meets! Click to show or hide the answer
Fictional dog that lived at Donaldson's Dairy (in a series of books by Lynley Dodd) Click to show or hide the answer
Winnie–the–Pooh: chapter 5 is entitled "In Which Piglet meets a ... " Click to show or hide the answer
Peter the goatherd is the best friend of Click to show or hide the answer
In a series of children's books by Francesca Simon, Perfect Peter is the brother of Click to show or hide the answer
British version of Mabel O'Donnell's Alice and Jerry (series of "basal reading" books published in the USA from the 1930s) Click to show or hide the answer
Charles Edwin Jeremy Darbishire – a mild–mannered, short–sighted clergyman's son – is the best friend of Click to show or hide the answer
Venables, Atkinson, Temple, Bromwich Major, Pettigrew and Marshall are other schoolmates of
Pen name of Daniel Handler, narrator of a series of books with the collective title A Series of Unfortunate Events – from The Bad Beginning, 1999, to The End, 2006 Click to show or hide the answer
Cedric Errol is better known as Click to show or hide the answer
Sarah Crewe is the heroine of (Francis Hodgson Burnett's) Click to show or hide the answer
The March sisters – Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy – are the central characters of Click to show or hide the answer
Cornish girls' seaside boarding school, featuring in a series of six books by Enid Blyton (1946–51) – protagonist Darrell Rivers Click to show or hide the answer
The tyrannical head teacher Miss Trunchbull, and the sympathetic teacher Miss Honey, feature in (Roald Dahl novel) Click to show or hide the answer
It was winter for 100 years, but never Christmas, in Click to show or hide the answer
Known in France as Monsieur Oui Oui Click to show or hide the answer
"I shall stay until the wind changes" Click to show or hide the answer
Roberta (Bobbie), Phyllis and Peter are Click to show or hide the answer
Real–life location of the fictional Punchbowl Farm, setting of over 25 books (1948–69) by Monica Edwards (d. 1998) Click to show or hide the answer
Book of children's stories by J. K. Rowling, published 2008 – purporting to be the book of the same name mentioned in the final Harry Potter book Click to show or hide the answer
1922 children's classic by Margery Williams: subtitle How Toys Become Real Click to show or hide the answer
Created by Martin Handford; known as Holger in Denmark, Charlie in France, Walter in Germany, Waldo in USA and Canada Click to show or hide the answer
Associates include twins Wilma and Wenda (friends), Odlaw (his nemesis), Woof (a dog) and Wizard Whitebeard
Subtitled A Fairy Tale for a Land Baby; set on St. Brandan's Isle Click to show or hide the answer
Classic 1963 story written and illustrated by Maurice Sendak (US), about a boy named Max who imagines a mysterious forest and sea in his bedroom Click to show or hide the answer
Alice Through the Looking Glass: character who says "The rule is, jam to–morrow and jam yesterday – but never jam to–day." Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Violet Elizabeth Bott is the arch–enemy of Click to show or hide the answer
"Piper at the Gates of Dawn" (title of Pink Floyd's first LP) is a chapter title from Click to show or hide the answer
Lived on Scatterbrook Farm Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2018