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Arts & Entertainment
Literature
Crime Fiction

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Sherlock Holmes
Sexton Blake
Father Brown
Inspector Morse
Other Detectives
Agatha Christie
Authors and Creators
Miscellaneous

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Crime Fiction

The first detective story (debatable – see below – but if asked, this is the answer to give) Click to show or hide the answer

The first fictional detective (appeared in The Murders in the Rue Morgue) Click to show or hide the answer

There is some confusion over the identity of the first fictional detective. This may be because Edgar Allan Poe was of course American, which leaves the door open for other characters to be cited as the first detective(s) in English fiction.  The best-qualified candidate for this honour is probably Sergeant Tulkinghorn, who appears in Dickens's Bleak House (1852).  But he is not a central character in Bleak House, and only appears some way through the narrative. The first detective novel in English fiction was probably Wilkie Collins's The Moonstone (1868) – because The Murders in the Rue Morgue (and Poe's other detective stories) were short stories, and the murder mystery is only one of the many plots in Bleak House.  The detective hero of The Moonstone is Sergeant Cuff – and he is also sometimes described as the first detective in English fiction.

Interestingly, it wasn't until around 1850 (according to The Online Etymology Dictionary) that the word detective was first used as a noun – nine years after The Murders in the Rue Morgue was written!

Sherlock Holmes

Has been portrayed in more films than any other fictional character; habitually injected cocaine to stimulate the brain, and used morphine as a recreational drug Click to show or hide the answer
Number of Sherlock Holmes stories written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Click to show or hide the answer
Monthly magazine in which most of the Sherlock Holmes stories were first published (1891–1927) Click to show or hide the answer
Illustrator of the Holmes stories in Strand magazine Click to show or hide the answer
The first Sherlock Holmes story Click to show or hide the answer
The second Sherlock Holmes story Click to show or hide the answer
Said to have been considered by Doyle to be the best of his stories – title refers to a snake (Indian swamp adder) – The Adventure of … Click to show or hide the answer
Sherlock Holmes's address Click to show or hide the answer
Sherlock Holmes was addicted to Click to show or hide the answer
Sherlock Holmes's elder brother Click to show or hide the answer
Sherlock Holmes's arch–enemy – referred to by him as "the Napoleon of crime" Click to show or hide the answer
Sherlock Holmes's housekeeper Click to show or hide the answer
Scotland Yard detective who often called on Holmes for advice Click to show or hide the answer
Sherlock Holmes's instrument Click to show or hide the answer
Type of hat associated with Sherlock Holmes (although not mentioned in the text of the books – only in illustrations) Click to show or hide the answer
Dr. Watson's first name Click to show or hide the answer
Dr. Watson was invalided home from the Battle of Maiwand, which (in reality as well as in Doyle) was one of the principal engagements of the Click to show or hide the answer
Setting for The Hound of the Baskervilles Click to show or hide the answer
After retiring, Holmes moved to the Sussex Downs to take up Click to show or hide the answer
Holmes and Moriarty died at the Click to show or hide the answer
Author of the Sherlock Holmes novels The House of Silk (2011) and Moriarty (2014) Click to show or hide the answer

Sexton Blake

The other fictional detective who lived in Baker Street Click to show or hide the answer
Sexton Blake's assistant Click to show or hide the answer
Sexton Blake's faithful bloodhound Click to show or hide the answer

Father Brown

Often assisted by a reformed criminal named Flambeau Click to show or hide the answer
The first Father Brown story Click to show or hide the answer
The first Father Brown collection (1911) Click to show or hide the answer

Inspector Morse

Inspector Morse's first name Click to show or hide the answer
Inspector Morse's sidekick Click to show or hide the answer
Lewis's first name Click to show or hide the answer
The first Inspector Morse novel (1975) – last episode in Series 2 on TV Click to show or hide the answer
The fifth Inspector Morse novel (1981), and the first episode in the TV series Click to show or hide the answer
The last Inspector Morse story (in print and on TV) Click to show or hide the answer

Other detectives (etc.)

12th century detective created by Edith Pargeter, writing as Ellis Peters, and played on TV by Derek Jacobi Click to show or hide the answer
Created by P. D. James; appeared in 14 of her 19 novels, including Cover Her Face (her 1962 debut) Click to show or hide the answer
Bess and George are or were girlfriends of Click to show or hide the answer
Private detective, created by H. C. McNeile, writing as 'Sapper' Click to show or hide the answer
Sir Denis Nayland Smith was the nemesis of Click to show or hide the answer
Private detective: protagonist of P. D. James's An Unsuitable Job for a Woman (1972) and The Skull Beneath the Skin (1982) Click to show or hide the answer
Created by Raymond Chandler; features in The Big Sleep, Farewell my Lovely, The Long Goodbye Click to show or hide the answer
Lived at, and worked from, Flat 203, 56B Whitehaven Mansions, London Click to show or hide the answer
Forensic scientist created by Patricia Cornwell: features in a series of novels beginning with Postmortem (1990), Flesh and Blood (2012) being the 22nd Click to show or hide the answer
Swedish detective, based in Ystad; created by Henning Mankell (first appeared in Swedish 1991, English 2007); played on British TV (2008, 2010) by Kenneth Branagh Click to show or hide the answer
Created by Ruth Rendell; features in 24 novels, from From Doon with Death (1964) to No Man's Nightingale (2013); Detective Inspector Mike Burton is a colleague of Click to show or hide the answer
Son of the 15th Duke of Denver; married Harriet Vane; lived at 110A Piccadilly Click to show or hide the answer
New York–based armchair detective, created in 1934 by Rex Stout Click to show or hide the answer

Agatha Christie

Hercule Poirot

Her first novel (1920); the first to feature Hercule Poirot, and later (1935) one of Penguin's first 20 titles. Supposedly based on a real life case that happened in Mussoorie, India; Kipling mentioned it to Conan Doyle, who suggested it to Christie Click to show or hide the answer
Poirot's nationality Click to show or hide the answer
Poirot's best friend and sleuthing partner – often narrates the stories that Poirot appears in Click to show or hide the answer
Captain Hastings's first name Click to show or hide the answer
Poirot's last case (1975 – one year before the death of the author; Poirot murders the suspect before his own death); also takes place at Styles Click to show or hide the answer
Poirot's secretary Click to show or hide the answer
Poirot's valet Click to show or hide the answer

Miss Marple

Her tenth novel (1930), and the first to feature Miss Marple Click to show or hide the answer
Miss Marple lives in (village) Click to show or hide the answer
Miss Marple's first name Click to show or hide the answer
Miss Marple's assistant (in films – none in the books) Click to show or hide the answer

Novels

Wealthy heiress Linnet Doyle is murdered by her newly–wed husband Simon, on their honeymoon Click to show or hide the answer
Her fifth novel (1926), described by her modern publisher as her masterpiece: turns out to be narrated by the murderer Click to show or hide the answer
Ten people murder Samuel Ratchett in Click to show or hide the answer

Authors and Creators (other)

Creator of the 'blue–blooded sleuth' Albert Campion – supposedly (according to Wikipedia) as a parody of Dorothy L. Sayers's Lord Peter Wimsey Click to show or hide the answer
Police inspector turned private detective, Jackson Brodie – first appeared in Case Histories (2004) Click to show or hide the answer
Trent's Last Case: author Click to show or hide the answer
Philip Marlowe Click to show or hide the answer
Veteran LAPD detective Heironymus 'Harry' Bosch – first appeared in The Black Echo (1992) Click to show or hide the answer
Aurelio Zen (Italian detective – 11 books, 1988–2007; author died 2009) Click to show or hide the answer
Van der Valk (the TV series was based on his character and settings but not his plots) Click to show or hide the answer
Cormoran Strike (first appeared in The Cuckoo's Calling, 2013) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Sam Spade (The Maltese Falcon – also three less well-known short stories) Click to show or hide the answer
Dalziel and Pascoe (originally in a series of novels) Click to show or hide the answer
Simon Serralier (first appeared in The Various Haunts of Men, 2004) Click to show or hide the answer
Edinburgh–based deputy chief constable Bob Skinner ('Britain's toughest cop'), private detective turned Hollywood actor Oz Blackstone, and his wife/widow Primavera Blackstone Click to show or hide the answer
Aberdeen–based Detective Sergeant Logan McRae – first appeared in Cold Granite (2005) Click to show or hide the answer
Inspector Alleyn Click to show or hide the answer
Clinical psychologist Dr. Tony Hill (played by Robson Green in the ITV series Wire in the Blood, 2002–8) Click to show or hide the answer
Capt. Hugh 'Bulldog' Drummond, private detective Click to show or hide the answer
Mrs. (later Dame Beatrice) Bradley – played by Diana Rigg in the BBC adaptation (1998–2000) Click to show or hide the answer
Oslo police detective Harry Hole (first appeared in The Bat, 1997) Click to show or hide the answer
Detective V. I Warshawski (played on film in 1991, and subsequently on BBC Radio 4, by Kathleen Turner) Click to show or hide the answer
Inspector (John) Rebus; Let it Bleed and Black and Blue are novels, Beggar's Banquet is a short story collection, named after Rolling Stones albums Click to show or hide the answer
Forensic anthropologist Temperance Brennan, protagonist of the Fox TV series Bones (2005–17) Click to show or hide the answer
Inspector Wexford Click to show or hide the answer
Lord Peter Wimsey Click to show or hide the answer
Inspector Maigret Click to show or hide the answer
The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency, Tears of the Giraffe (etc.) Click to show or hide the answer
Jack Frost (played on TV by David Jason) Click to show or hide the answer

Miscellaneous

The Nine Tailors (Dorothy L. Sayers) were Click to show or hide the answer
Inspector Maigret's first name Click to show or hide the answer
First name of Inspector Alleyn (Ngaio Marsh) Click to show or hide the answer
Profession of Inspector Alleyn's wife Click to show or hide the answer
Ex–boxer Lugg: manservant to Click to show or hide the answer
Murders in the Rue Morgue (Edgar Allan Poe) : the murderer was Click to show or hide the answer
Inspector Wexford (Ruth Rendell) lives and works in Click to show or hide the answer
Perry Mason's secretary Click to show or hide the answer
Inspector Rebus novels (Ian Rankin): set in Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2018