Monkey

Quiz Monkey
What do you want to know?

You are here:

Buildings & Architecture
Bridges

On this page:

Longest
Types of Bridge
Specific Bridges

If you like my website, and/or if you've found it useful, please consider making a small donation to my Just Giving page, which I've set up just for this purpose. To begin with I'm collecting for a charity whose work I have benefitted from myself (and continue to do so): the British Heart Foundation. It would be great to raise £100 in the first month.

If you have already donated ... Thank You!

Bridges

Longest

An incomplete history (in reverse chronological order) of the world's longest single span suspension bridge:

1991Japan Links Awaji Island to Honshu (Kobe); Awaji lies between Honshu and Shikoku Click to show or hide the answer
1981UK Links the towns of Barton (Lincolnshire) and Hessle (East Yorkshire, near Hull) Click to show or hide the answer
1964USLinks Brooklyn and Staten Island (New York) Click to show or hide the answer
1937USSpans the entrance to San Francisco Bay, linking the city to Marin County Click to show or hide the answer
1931USSpans the Hudson River, linking Manhattan to Fort Lee, New Jersey Click to show or hide the answer

Types of Bridge

A bridge with a moveable, counterbalanced span – from the French for seesaw and balance; London's Tower Bridge is one of the world's most famous examples Click to show or hide the answer
The Forth Railway Bridge is one of the world's most famous examples of a Click to show or hide the answer

Specific Bridges

Note: Wikipedia makes a distinction between the highest bridges and the tallest bridges.  The height of a bridge is the maximum vertical drop from the deck (or road bed) down to the ground or water surface beneath the bridge span; the tallest bridges are those with the greatest vertical drop between their uppermost point (typically the top of the tower) and their lowest visible point, where the piers emerge from the surface of the ground or water.

The world's highest cable-stayed bridge (as opposed to suspension bridge; see Si Du River Bridge) – Mexico, opened 2012 Click to show or hide the answer
San Francisco's second bridge – links San Francisco to Oakland Click to show or hide the answer
Links the Ducal Palace to the state prison, in Venice Click to show or hide the answer
Rail bridge over the Menai Straits, designed by Robert Stephenson, opened in 1850; severely damaged by fire in 1970, reopened in 1980 with a road carriageway above the new railway Click to show or hide the answer
New York – opened in 1883 – one of the world's first suspension bridges Click to show or hide the answer
Bridge in Glasgow, opened 2006; previously known as the Finniestown Bridge; nicknamed the Squinty Bridge (because it crosses the river at an angle) Click to show or hide the answer
Oresund Bridge (opened 2000) links (Denmark and Sweden, respectively) Click to show or hide the answer
The last bridge over the Clyde, going downstream – opened in 1971 Click to show or hide the answer
The world's second longest single span suspension bridge (see history above); completed in 1998; named after the strait between the main Danish islands of Zealand and Funen (Danish: Storebaelt), which it spans Click to show or hide the answer
The first suspension bridge over the Thames (1827 – rebuilt in 1877, again as a suspension bridge) Click to show or hide the answer
Bridge over the Niagara River (a.k.a. Falls View Bridge, officially the Upper Steel Arch Bridge): collapsed in 1938, replaced by the Rainbow Bridge Click to show or hide the answer
Opened in 1981, was the world's longest single–span suspension bridge until 1997; 4th longest, 2007 Click to show or hide the answer
Completed in 1831 (on a site where there had been a bridge since Roman times); bought by a US oil company in 1968 for £2.4million (reputedly having been mistaken for Tower Bridge); now crosses Lake Havasu, Arizona; current bridge completed in 1973 Click to show or hide the answer
Popular name for the Wooden Bridge across the River Cam in Cambridge, originally built in 1749, linking two parts of Queen's College. Myths about it include its being of Chinese origin, its being designed by Isaac Newton (although he died 22 years before it was built) and that no bolts were used in its construction (there are bolts in it now – allegedly because the dons who took it apart to see how the students had done it couldn't put it back together again) Click to show or hide the answer
Suspension bridge linking Anglesey to the mainland, designed by Thomas Telford, opened in 1826 Click to show or hide the answer
The world's tallest bridge (from ground to the highest part of the bridge) open to vehicular traffic – in southern France, opened 2004 – designed by Michel Virlogeux and Sir Norman Foster – see Si Du River Bridge Click to show or hide the answer
Connects Copenhagen (Denmark) to Malmo (Sweden) – the longest bridge in the world that crosses a national border Click to show or hide the answer
Bridge of the Americas spans Click to show or hide the answer
Telford's famous aqueduct carrying the Llangollen Canal over the River Dee Click to show or hide the answer
Bridge in Bath with shops lining both sides (the only one in Europe, apart from the Ponte Vecchio in Florence) Click to show or hide the answer
The second bridge to be built over the Thames at London (i.e. downstream from Kingston) – opened 1792 Click to show or hide the answer
The last bridge over the Thames – completed in 1990, carries southbound M25 traffic Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's tallest bridge: opened in 2017, carries the M90 over the Firth of Forth Click to show or hide the answer
Spans the Niagara River, near the falls; opened in 1941; same name as a national monument in Utah Click to show or hide the answer
Clifton Suspension Bridge spans Click to show or hide the answer
Brunel's famous bridge carrying the GWR over the River Tamar, between Plymouth (Devon) and Saltash (Cornwall) Click to show or hide the answer
Replaced the Aust ferry in 1966; runs from Aust to Beachley; since 1996, carries the M48 Click to show or hide the answer
The world's highest bridge (maximum height of deck above ground) – China, opened 2009 Click to show or hide the answer
Connects Millers Point to Milsons Point (passing over Dawes Point) Click to show or hide the answer
Completed in 1940 as the world's third–longest single span suspension bridge; named after the stretch of the Puget Sound in Washington State, USA, which it spans; nicknamed Galloping Gertie after its tendency to sway and buckle in high winds; spectacularly self–destructed in November 1940, just four months after opening, and was famously filmed doing so Click to show or hide the answer
Prehistoric (c. 1000 BC) clapper bridge over the River Barle on Exmoor, Somerset – little more than stepping stones Click to show or hide the answer
Collapsed on 28 December 1879 Click to show or hide the answer
Europe's longest bridge: 12.345 km (7.671 miles); opened in 1998, spans the Tagus just north of Lisbon; named after a famous Portuguese explorer Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017