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Quiz Monkey
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Buildings & Architecture
Buildings and Monuments

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Britain
Britain: Lighthouses
Rest of Europe
USA
The Taj Mahal
Rest of the World

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Buildings and Monuments

This page is a bit of a mish–mash – basically, it covers anything (about buildings and other man–made edifices, obviously) that isn't covered anywhere else in the Buildings and Architecture category.

Britain

Please note that buildings in London are likely to be covered on the London page.

Prisons on the Isle of Wight (since the closure of Camp Hill in 2013): Parkhurst and Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Scotland's biggest prison, in terms of the number of prisoners it can accommodate Click to show or hide the answer
London landmark: built in two stages in the 1930s and 1950s, largely unused since 1983; featured on the cover of Pink Floyd's 1977 album Animals, with a giant inflatable pig floating above it Click to show or hide the answer
Public house on Whitechapel Road, in the East End of London: the former brewery tap of the Manns Albion brewery, where the first modern Brown Ale was brewed; known for Ronnie Kray's murder of George Cornell (in front of witnesses), and as the location of William Booth's first sermon, which led to the creation of the Salvation Army Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's second–largest castle, after Windsor Click to show or hide the answer
Built in 1851 to house the Great Exhibition; moved (from Hyde Park to Penge Park in south London) in 1854, destroyed by fire in 1936 Click to show or hide the answer
Gothic revival castle near Ayr, in south–west Scotland, designed by Robert Adam in the late 18th century; used as the home of Lord Summerisle in the 1973 film The Wicker Man; has a room dedicated to US President Dwight D. Eisenhower Click to show or hide the answer
The Scottish crown jewels are kept in Click to show or hide the answer
Designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh – often considered to be his masterpiece – and built between 1879 and 1909; badly damaged by fire in 2014 Click to show or hide the answer
Brighton hotel bombed by the IRA during the Conservative Party conference in 1984 Click to show or hide the answer
The Monument, London, commemorates Click to show or hide the answer
Scarborough hotel that collapsed into the sea in 1993 Click to show or hide the answer
Hotel next to Manchester United's Old Trafford ground, part–owned by five members of United's 'Class of '92' (Butt, Giggs, Scholes and the Nevilles): opened in 2015, the first in a planned global chain Click to show or hide the answer
On the site of St. James's Palace, prior to Henry VIII's reign Click to show or hide the answer
The original entrance to Buckingham Palace; now stands on the site where Tyburn gallows stood from the 12th century until 1783 Click to show or hide the answer
In 1957, the American Bar Association created a memorial (designed by Sir Edward Maufe) to Click to show or hide the answer
Official name is the Central Criminal Court (of Justice); stands on the site formerly occupied by Newgate Prison Click to show or hide the answer
Public house in Combe Martin, Devon: has four floors, with 13 rooms on each floor, and a total of 52 windows Click to show or hide the answer
Popular name, after the hill on which it stands, for the monument built in 1844 in memory of the 1st Earl of Durham – a half–size replica of an ancient Greek temple, now in the city of Sunderland, but plainly visible from the A1(M) Click to show or hide the answer
Brighton has two, Blackpool has three Click to show or hide the answer
Public house in Prescot, Merseyside: named in honour of former Prime Minister Harold Wilson, in whose constituency it stands Click to show or hide the answer
London's Monument stands in Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's most common pub name, according to most sources – although CAMRA (in 2006) had it second to The Crown, by some distance Click to show or hide the answer
14–storey block of flats in Newham, east London that collapsed in 1968, two months after completion Click to show or hide the answer
Home of the Chelsea Pensioners; Chelsea Flower Show is held in its grounds Click to show or hide the answer
White Lodge, Richmond Park: former royal residence, now houses thet Click to show or hide the answer
Overlooks Loch Ness: on a headland beside the A82 road, 13 miles from Inverness and 1 mile from the village of Drumnadrochit Click to show or hide the answer
Ornate public building in Manchester, opened in 1906 and closed in 1993: won the first BBC TV Restoration series in 2003 Click to show or hide the answer
Originally built by William the Conqueror, 1068: home to the world's largest trebuchet or catapult (built in 2005 to a Danish design) Click to show or hide the answer
The World's largest inhabited castle; Europe's longest–occupied royal palace Click to show or hide the answer
Home of BBC Radio 2 and BBC 6 Music, since 2006 (used by the BBC since 1953): previously Western House, renamed in 2016 Click to show or hide the answer

Britain: Lighthouses

At the westernmost tip of the Scilly Isles (listed by Guinness as the world's smallest island that has a building on it) Click to show or hide the answer
20 miles south–west of Plymouth; first built 1698 by Henry Winstanley; destroyed successively by storm, fire and erosion Click to show or hide the answer
Off the Fife coast – approx. 12 miles from the mouth of the Tay – completed 1811, said to be the world's oldest surviving sea–washed lighthouse – based on the third Eddystone lighthouse, which was replaced around 1880 and now stands on Plymouth Hoe Click to show or hide the answer
2km or 1.5 miles west of Land's End Click to show or hide the answer
Island off Unst, Shetland, that has Britain's most northerly lighthouse; often said to be Britain's most northerly island, although that honour actually belongs to Out Stack, about 1 mile further north; when the lighthouse was manned, this was Britain's most northerly inhabited island Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's last manned lighthouse (Kent – went automatic 1998) Click to show or hide the answer
East of the Scilly Isles, 9 miles south–west of Land's End Click to show or hide the answer

Rest of Europe

Built in 1961, demolished in 1989; officially known as the Anti–Fascist Protection Rampart Click to show or hide the answer
Building on Sackville Street (now O'Connell Street), Dublin: occupied by rebel forces on Easter Monday 1916, and used as their headquarters during the so–called Easter Rising Click to show or hide the answer
Complex of buildings in Paris – originally a home for retired soldiers – where many French war heroes, including Napoelon Bonaparte, are buried Click to show or hide the answer
Former prison in Moscow that housed the headquarters of the KGB Click to show or hide the answer
Monument in O'Connell Street, Dublin – blown up in 1966 Click to show or hide the answer
Former church in Paris: burial place of French luminaries such as Voltaire, Rousseau, Victor Hugo, Zola, Marie Curie Click to show or hide the answer
High–class government–run hotels, formerly stately homes, castles and palaces Spain Click to show or hide the answer
Portugal Click to show or hide the answer
Temple on the Acropolis of Athens, dedicated to the goddess Athena: the original home of the Elgin Marbles Click to show or hide the answer
Building in Paris that houses a Public Information Library, France's National Museum of Modern Art (Europe's largest museum for modern art), and IRCAM, a centre for music and acoustic research; known locally as the Beaubourg (after the area in which it's located); completed 1977, and named after the French president who commissioned it Click to show or hide the answer
French chateau said to have been the model for Perrault's Sleeping Beauty Click to show or hide the answer

USA

Building in Washington DC that houses the US Congress Click to show or hide the answer
Historic New York hotel where Dylan Thomas and Nancy Spungen both died, and where Arthur C. Clarke wrote 2001: A Space Odyssey; other residents have included Bob Dylan, Brendan Behan, Janis Joplin, Tom Waits, Leonard Cohen, Patti Smith and Iggy Pop Click to show or hide the answer
New York skyscraper, built between 1928 and 1930; it was the world's tallest building, until it was eclipsed by the Empire State building the following year; the best–known work of architect William van Alen Click to show or hide the answer
Famous apartment block in New York, built in the 1880s, declared a National Historic Landmark in 1976; John Lennon lived in it from 1973 and was shot outside it in 1980; the reason for the name is obscure Click to show or hide the answer
The Fuller Building, 175 Fifth Avenue, New York: built 1903, triangular section, one of the first skyscrapers (the English American Building, in Atlanta, Georgia, built 5 years earlier, has the same nickname) Click to show or hide the answer
Los Angeles hotel, 26 storeys, gutted in 1980 by one of the USA's worst–ever fires Click to show or hide the answer
The world's largest office building (150 acres) Click to show or hide the answer

The Taj Mahal

The Taj Mahal was built between 1632 and 1653 by the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan, as a monument to his favourite wife, who had died in 1631 during the birth of their 14th child. Born Arjumand Bano Begum ('Begum' being an honorific title for a Muslim woman of high social status), she was in fact Jahan's first cousin. He renamed her Mumtaz Mahal, which means 'Chosen One of the Palace' or 'Jewel of the Palace'. The name 'Taj Mahal' literally means 'Crown of the Palace' – although it seems to me that the use of the word 'Mahal' is a direct reference to the lady herself, so a more appropriate translation might be 'Crown of Mumtaz Mahal'.

The above paragraph, which I put in mainly to explain the name, contains most of the information you're ever likely to need about the Taj Mahal. But here it is again, in bite–sized, quiz–type chunks:

City Click to show or hide the answer
On the southern bank of the Click to show or hide the answer
Built Click to show or hide the answer
Built by Click to show or hide the answer
As a monument to his favourite wife (of three) Click to show or hide the answer
Name means Click to show or hide the answer

Rest of the World

Stretches (according to some – e.g. Wikipedia) from the city of Dandong in the east to Lop Lake in the west Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017–18