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Buildings & Architecture
Places of Worship

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Places of Worship

The world's largest temple complex: built in the 12th century, now one of Cambodia's most popular tourist attractions Click to show or hide the answer
Built in the late 11th century, about 10 miles north–west of Hastings Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Nickname of the tower of St. Botolph's Church, Boston, Lincs Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's oldest cathedral (founded 602 AD by St. Augustine); Bell Harry Tower – completed 1510, once called “the finest tower in Christendom” – strikes 100 times from 20:55 to sound the city's curfew Click to show or hide the answer
50 miles WSW of Paris, famous for its stained glass Click to show or hide the answer
English parish church famous for its twisted spire Click to show or hide the answer
British cathedral with a detached bell tower Click to show or hide the answer
Church in Bethlehem, built (according to tradition) over the cave where Jesus was born Click to show or hide the answer
Epstein's St. Michael slaying the Devil is on the outside wall of Click to show or hide the answer
English cathedral with a famous octagonal tower; nicknamed 'the Ship of the Fens'; depicted (in the distance) on the cover of Pink Floyd's 1994 album The Division Bell Click to show or hide the answer
Ruined Cistercian monastery, two miles from Ripon, North Yorkshire Click to show or hide the answer
Edinburgh parish church (kirk): a meeting place for the Covenanters (17th century Presbyterians); also associated with a Skye terrier named Bobby, who is said to have lived on his master's grave in its graveyard for 14 years (1858–72) Click to show or hide the answer
The largest known mediaeval mappa mundi still in existence is on display at Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Staffordshire cathedral with three spires (one of two in England – see Truro) – known as the Ladies of the Vale Click to show or hide the answer
First consecrated in 1092, destroyed by fire 50 years later; rebuilt and consecrated c. 1145, destroyed by an earthquake in 1185; rebuilt c. 1300, replacing the Great Pyramid as the world's tallest man–made structure; lost that claim in 1549 (to St. Olaf's church in Tallinn) when the central spire was destroyed in a storm; now England's third–largest cathedral (after St. Paul's and York Minster). Described by John Ruskin as " ... out and out the most precious piece of architecture in the British Isles and roughly speaking worth any two other cathedrals we have" Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's biggest cathedral, the world's eighth biggest, and the world's longest (if you don't count St. Peter's, Rome, which is not a cathedral); foundation stone laid in 1904, completed in 1978 Click to show or hide the answer
Construction began in 1962, completed in 1967; irreverently nicknamed 'Paddy's Wigwam' or 'the Mersey Funnel' Click to show or hide the answer
Benedictine monastery, occupied by Nazis, destroyed by Allies 1944 Click to show or hide the answer
St. Basil's Cathedral Click to show or hide the answer
Architectural style of which Durham Cathedral is a fine example Click to show or hide the answer
St. German's Cathedral (where in the British Isles …?) (Note: St. Germans is also a village in Cornwall with a priory of the same name) Click to show or hide the answer
English style of 1360–1540 Click to show or hide the answer
Ruined Cistercian abbey near Helmsley, North Yorkshire – Harold Wilson took his title from it on being granted a peerage Click to show or hide the answer
Cathedral in Montmartre, Paris, which 'uneasily' mixes Romanesque and Byzantine styles of architecture Click to show or hide the answer
Massive church in Barcelona, designed by Antoni Gaudi: construction began 1882, completion scheduled for 2026 Click to show or hide the answer
Tallest cathedral spire in Britain Click to show or hide the answer
The place of worship in Windsor Castle: the chapel of the Order of the Garter – holds a service for it, annually since 1948; burial place of many monarchs and other members of the royal family; also the venue for many royal weddings, including Prince Edward 1999 and Peter Phillips 2008; Prince Charles' marriage to Camilla Parker–Bowles was blessed there 2005 Click to show or hide the answer
Northernmost cathedral in the British Isles Click to show or hide the answer
Church of Bow Bells; said to have persuaded Dick Whittington to turn again to become thrice Lord Mayor of London Click to show or hide the answer
Whispering Gallery, Stone Gallery, Golden Gallery Click to show or hide the answer
The World's largest Christian church or cathedral Click to show or hide the answer
Cathedral of the Resurrection of Christ – known as the Church (of the Saviour) on Spilled Blood – Tsar Alexander II was mortally wounded there in 1888 Click to show or hide the answer
Ruined abbey on the banks of the River Wye in Monmouthshire: subject of paintings by Turner, and poems by Wordsworth and Tennyson Click to show or hide the answer
First Anglican cathedral built since St. Paul's – one of two in England with three spires (see Lichfield) Click to show or hide the answer
The world's highest cathedral spire Click to show or hide the answer
Popular name (amongst non-Jews) for the West Wall (the last remaining part) of Jerusalem's ancient Jewish temple Click to show or hide the answer
Cathedral with famous steps leading to the Chapter House; Jack Blandiver (a mechanical figure) sounds the quarter–hours Click to show or hide the answer
The Collegiate Church of St. Peter is more commonly known as  
Tomb of the Unknown Warrior; Poets' Corner; shrine of St. Edward the Confessor
'Remember Winston Churchill': on a slab of marble on the floor of
The largest Catholic church in England and Wales: foundation stone laid in 1895, opened in 1903; officially known as the Cathedral Church of the Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ; described by John Betjeman as "a masterpiece in striped brick and stone in an intricate pattern of bonding" Click to show or hide the answer
Cathedral where the relics of St. Swithin are kept Click to show or hide the answer
St. George's Chapel is in the grounds of Click to show or hide the answer
The largest gothic church in Northern Europe; suffered a major fire in 1984, thought to have been caused by a lightning strike; famous for its stained glass, including the Five Sisters window (1260), the Great West Window (1330s), the Great East Window (1405) and the Rose Window (1515). 'Five Sisters' may be a corruption of 'Five Cistercians' (it uses glass known to be favoured by the Cistercian monks); the Five Sisters window is also (was previously) known as the Jewish Window Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017