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Food & Drink
Drinks

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Measures
Minimum Ages
Places
Other

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Drinks

See also Cocktails, Beer, Wine (etc.)

Measures

See also Beer Measures, Wine Bottles.

Number of gills in a pint Click to show or hide the answer
Variously defined as one eighth of a gill (one thirty–second of a pint), one eighth of a pint, one third of a pint, or "anything less than half a pint"; abbreviated to 'nip', which has become a legal measure in Australia and New Zealand (30 ml) and is commonly used in the USA to mean a third of a pint; from the Dutch word for a sip Click to show or hide the answer
Number of fluid ounces in a pint UK Click to show or hide the answer
USA Click to show or hide the answer

Pub spirit measures

The measures of spirits sold in UK pubs were first regulated in 1963. The legal measures were one sixth, one fifth and one quarter of a gill. Each pub could only use one of these options, and was obliged to display which one it used. In England the smallest measure (one sixth of a gill) was the most common; in Scotland, depending on which source you believe, one fifth or one quarter was more common. One quarter of a gill was most popular in Ireland, and is regulated today as 35.5 ml.

Since 1985 the legal measures in the UK have been 25 ml and 35 ml. As before, each pub can only use one of these options. Double measures (as opposed to two single measures delivered into the same glass) became legal in 2001.

Minimum ages

Cognac

Use these classifications with care. They are not in any way official, and sources vary on the detail.

One star Click to show or hide the answer
Two stars Click to show or hide the answer
Three stars Click to show or hide the answer
VSO (Very Superior (sometimes Special)) Click to show or hide the answer
VSOP (Very Superior Old Pale) Click to show or hide the answer
XO (extra old) Click to show or hide the answer

Other

Minimum age for malt whisky (in Scotland and Ireland) Click to show or hide the answer

Places

Coca–Cola was invented 1886 by Dr. John S. Pemberton in (US city) Click to show or hide the answer
Emva Queen sherry is produced in (country) Click to show or hide the answer
Metaxa is a brandy–based liqueur, produced in (country) Click to show or hide the answer
Scottish island, home of one of the four classes of malt whiskies, including Bowmore (named after its largest town), Ardbeg, Laphroaig and Lagavulin; an eighth opened in 2005 Click to show or hide the answer
Blue Mountain – one of the world's most expensive and sought–after coffees, over 80% of which is exported to Japan – comes from (Caribbean country) Click to show or hide the answer
Tia Maria comes from
Campbeltown (one of Scotland's four traditional whisky–producing regions) is in (or on) the (peninsula) Click to show or hide the answer
Babycham is made in (Somerset town – also an important centre for cider production) Click to show or hide the answer
Absolut Vodka is produced in (country) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Home to Jack Daniel's whiskey (US state) Click to show or hide the answer
Angostura is in (country) Click to show or hide the answer

Other

100% proof: percentage alcohol Click to show or hide the answer
Temperature for pasteurisation of milk Click to show or hide the answer
Minimum age at which whisky can be sold in the UK Click to show or hide the answer

Spirit patented by Dr. Ordinaire in Switzerland, 1797; distilled from the leaves of the wormwood (artemisia) shrub, flavoured with aniseed and fennel Click to show or hide the answer
The Wormwood Society is dedicated to the promotion and enjoyment of
Known as "the green fairy" or "the green muse"
Thick, creamy liqueur, originally made in Dutch Guiana (Surinam) from avocados; now made in the Netherlands from eggs, sugar and brandy Click to show or hide the answer
Amaretto: sweet Italian liqueur flavoured with Click to show or hide the answer
Spanish word for a medium dry sherry Click to show or hide the answer
Whimsical name given by distillers to the part of the spirit that is lost through the roof of the bonded warehouse while the malt matures in the casks Click to show or hide the answer
Named after the South American tree from whose bark it is made; added to gin to make pink gin Click to show or hide the answer
Principal flavouring of the aperitifs ouzo (Greece), raki (Turkey), and pastis (France – marketed as Pernod or Ricard) Click to show or hide the answer
Vermouth, bitters, anises: three types of Click to show or hide the answer
US name for a strong cider made by distilling ordinary cider (hard cider) Click to show or hide the answer
Calvados is a traditional Normandy brandy, made from Click to show or hide the answer
Barack: Hungarian brandy, flavoured with Click to show or hide the answer
Scandinavian spirit, similar to schnapps, also made from potatoes Click to show or hide the answer
Hilly region in the foothills of the Pyrenees, Gascony, France, famous for its deep coloured brandy – France's oldest; traditionally distilled once, resulting in 52% of alcohol; said to be more fragrant and flavorful than Cognac, which is distilled twice Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional Highland liqueur – whisky, honey, oatmeal, eggs, cream, herbs Click to show or hide the answer
Golden–coloured liqueur from the Abbey of Fecamp, Normandy; label bears the letters D. O. M. – Deo Optimo Maximo (to God most good most great) Click to show or hide the answer
Hybrid fruit whose oil is used to flavour Earl Grey tea – see also Plants (domesticated) Click to show or hide the answer
(Crème de) cassis: flavoured with Click to show or hide the answer
Company founded in 2002 to operate a distillery in Shetland, which was Scotland's most northerly, for its short period of production; it entered administration in 2008 Click to show or hide the answer
US whiskey with at least 51% maize – shares its name with a French dynasty Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Metaxa is a type of Click to show or hide the answer
Fortified wine with caffeine, named after the abbey in Devon where it's produced: very popular in Scotland, where it's become controversial due to its links with 'ned' (lout) culture Click to show or hide the answer
The world's oldest distillery Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Tequila: distilled from the juice of a Click to show or hide the answer
Liqueur made at Voiron, near Grenoble (Isere department); named after the Carthusian monastery where it was produced until 1935 Click to show or hide the answer
Kirsch (a.k.a. kirschwasser) is a clear fruit brandy, made by distilling (the fruit known in German as kirsch) Click to show or hide the answer
Wisniowka (vish-nee-ov-ka) is a Polish liqueur, made by flavouring vodka with
Invented by Dr. John S. Pemberton in Atlanta, Georgia, going on sale for the first time on 29 Mar 1886; originally sold as a hangover cure: "The estimable brain tonic and intellectual beverage" Click to show or hide the answer
Comes in two varieties – arabica (better) and robusta (stronger, hardier, more resistant to disease, and more bitter to taste); flavour of the liqueurs Kahlua and Tia Maria Click to show or hide the answer
Town on the river Charente, in south–western France (near Angouleme): gave its name to one of the world's best known types of brandy Click to show or hide the answer
Liqueur named after the family that makes it at Angers, France Click to show or hide the answer
Frappe Click to show or hide the answer
Traditionally used to make the stills for malt whiskey Click to show or hide the answer
Blue liqueur, named after the Caribbean island it comes from, which is part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands; flavoured with laraha (a local variety of orange) Click to show or hide the answer
Prince Charles Edward's liqueur, founded 1745; made from whisky and heather honey; name comes from the Gaelic for "the drink that satisfies" Click to show or hide the answer
Carbonated soft drink, created by Charles Alderton in Waco, Texas, and introduced in 1885 – one year before Coca–Cola; marketed on its unique flavour Click to show or hide the answer
Strong dark Italian coffee, served in small cups Click to show or hide the answer
Hazelnut–flavoured Italian liqueur, introduced in the 1980s, packaged in bottles designed to resemble the monk who is supposed to have invented it – but actually named after an Italian renaissance painter Click to show or hide the answer
Sweet yellow herbal liqueur, created in 1896 by Arturo Vaccari of Livorno, Tuscany – named after an Italian hero of the First Italo–Ethiopian War Click to show or hide the answer
Produced by the Grant family on Speyside since 1876; said by the Whisky Exchange (2016) to account for about 30% of all single malt whisky sales worldwide Click to show or hide the answer
Said to be the world's best–selling single malt whisky – "perhaps [according to the Whisky Exchange] on account of the story of George Smith, an illegal distiller in Speyside who went legit when he obtained the first license to legally distill whisky in 1824"; bought by Pernod Ricard in 2000 Click to show or hide the answer
Single malt whisky distillery just off the A9, 35 miles north of Inverness and about 1 mile south of the Dornoch Firth Bridge; name is said to mean either "glen of tranquility" or (perhaps more credibly) "glen of big meadows" Click to show or hide the answer
Orange–flavoured liqueur based on cognac Click to show or hide the answer
Italian brandy, distilled from pomace (the solid stuff left after the juice has been extracted from grapes) Click to show or hide the answer
Syrup made (originally) from pomegranate juice, water and sugar, which gives the pink or red colour to many mixed drinks and cocktails including the Singapore sling and the pink lady; name comes from the French word for a pomegranate (grenade) Click to show or hide the answer
Tea whose leaves have been rolled into pellets Click to show or hide the answer
Distillery at Kirkwall, Orkney – Scotland's most northerly, until or unless Blackwood begins operation Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional Spanish drink, made from ground almonds, sesame seeds, rice and barley – or, alternatively, from water, sugar and tigernuts; sometimes known as tigernut milk (can be used as a milk substitute by the lactose intolerant) Click to show or hide the answer
Whiskey produced in Lynchburg, Tennessee since 1875; known for its square bottles and black label Click to show or hide the answer
Herbal liqueur (or 'digestif') produced in Wolfenbüttel, Lower Saxony, since 1935: became very popular with younger drinkers, first in the USA, from the 1980s; name is German for 'hunting master' Click to show or hide the answer
Dutch liquor from which gin (and its name) evolved, after the accession of William III to the British throne – sometimes known in English as Holland gin or Dutch gin Click to show or hide the answer
Brand of Scotch whisky, named after the Ayrshire grocer who began selling it in 1820 Click to show or hide the answer
Shrub or small tree, whose berries (strictly cones) are used to give gin its distinctive flavour Click to show or hide the answer
Made from dry white wine and cassis (blackcurrant cordial); named after the 20th–century Mayor of Dijon who is said to have invented it Click to show or hide the answer
Cassis and champagne Click to show or hide the answer
Cherry brandy, traditionally used in Black Forest gateau Click to show or hide the answer
Liqueur originating in the Netherlands, in the 16th century: flavoured with caraway seeds, cumin and fennel (in German, caraway is Echter Kümmel and cumin is Kreuzkümmel) Click to show or hide the answer
Mildly alcoholic drink made from cereals and stale black or rye bread, popular in Russia and other eastern European countries since mediaeval times – sometimes described as "the national drink of Russia" Click to show or hide the answer
Chinese tea, traditionally dried over pinewood fires; name means 'smoky variety' Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional Punjabi drink made from yogurt, water, salt and spices; sometimes (but not traditionally) sweetened and includes fruit instead of spices Click to show or hide the answer
Lemon liqueur of southern Italy – traditionally served as an after–dinner digestif, latterly popular as a cocktail ingredient Click to show or hide the answer
Bourbon whiskey is distilled from Click to show or hide the answer
Liqueur made from black Dalmatian cherries Click to show or hide the answer
Ancient alcoholic beverage (known in India in the 2nd millennium BC): fermented from honey, yeast and water – also known as honey wine or hydromel, or (if flavoured with herbs or fruit, respectively) metheglin or melomel Click to show or hide the answer
Distilled in Mexico from the sap of any type of agave (a–GAY–vee) plant; name means 'oven–cooked agave' in the local Nahuatl language (cf.Tequila) Click to show or hide the answer
Sweetened, spiced port or sherry with hot water, named after the colonel who invented it in the reign of Queen Anne Click to show or hide the answer
Half pint of ale with a tot of rum Click to show or hide the answer
Popular aniseed–flavoured Greek liquor Click to show or hide the answer
Fruit flavouring in Southern Comfort Click to show or hide the answer
Introduced in 1893 by druggist Caleb Bradham of New Bern, North Carolina, as Brad's Drink; renamed in 1898 (the new name reflecting the maker's claim that it cures indigestion) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Fermented pear juice (is to pears what cider is to apples) Click to show or hide the answer
Popular English brand of 'fruit cup', introduced in 1823 and owned since 1997 by Diageo; based on gin, traditionally served with lemonade (or ginger ale) and chopped fruit, etc. Click to show or hide the answer
Spanish vessel for drinking without touching the lips Click to show or hide the answer
Hot drink of milk curdled with wine or ale, often spiced – popular as a cold and flu remedy from medieval times to the 19th century (word mainly used nowadays for a related dessert similar to syllabub) Click to show or hide the answer
Illicit whisky made in Ireland from barley Click to show or hide the answer
Bitter alkaloid (drug) added to water to make tonic water Click to show or hide the answer
Energy drink, launched in Austria in 1987 (based on a Thai original); popular in 'jäger bombs' (made by adding a shot of Jägermeister); producer is widely involved in sports sposorship, including a Formula One racing team founded in 2005, which won the constructors' championship four consecutive years 2010–13 (Sebastian Vettel winning the drivers' championship in those years in one of its cars) Click to show or hide the answer
Sake is made from Click to show or hide the answer
Herbal tea, originating in South Africa; name is Afrikaans for 'red bush' Click to show or hide the answer
Distilled from fermented molasses or sugar cane juice Click to show or hide the answer
Italian aniseed–flavoured liqueur, traditionally served with coffee beans Click to show or hide the answer
Soft drink, originally made from the Smilax ornata plant (native to Mexico and Central America): popular in the USA in the 19th century, and in the UK's temperance movement Click to show or hide the answer
Spirit made from potatoes or grains, often flavoured with herbs (especially caraway or anise) – in various northern European countries (Germany, Netherlands, Scandinavia); or, German or Austrian fruit brandy; also a generic term used in German–speaking countries (with one 'p') for liquor Click to show or hide the answer
First produced in Geneva in 1771; inventor moved to London in 1792 Click to show or hide the answer
Originally sold in 1929 as Bib–Label Lithiated Lemon–Lime Soda; officially renamed in 1936 Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Fino (light, dry) and Oloroso (dark, sweet – Spanish for 'scented') are the two types of Click to show or hide the answer
A copita is a type of glass particularly used for drinking Click to show or hide the answer
"Jigger" and "pony" are early names for types of Click to show or hide the answer
Colourless plum brandy from Balkan countries Click to show or hide the answer
Made by infusing carbonic acid into water under pressure Click to show or hide the answer
Porter is now known as Click to show or hide the answer
Rum is distilled from Click to show or hide the answer
The world's largest whisky distillery Click to show or hide the answer
Tiquira: Brazilian spirit, made from Click to show or hide the answer
Port that is matured in oak casks and thus loses some of its colour Click to show or hide the answer
Lapsang souchong, oolong, orange pekoe, gunpowder, Lady Londonderry, and Guan Yin are types of Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Made from the leaves of Camellia sinensis
Mexican spirit made by fermenting and distilling the juice of the blue agave (a–GAY–vee); named after a town near Guadalajara (cf. Mezcal) Click to show or hide the answer
Cider maker, founded 1904 in Sandford, Somerset: brands include Green Goblin, Cheddar Valley, Somerset Haze, Old Rascal Click to show or hide the answer
Created in British India, when army officers began mixing quinine (which they took to combat malaria) with soda water and tonic to make the quinine more palatable; first produced commercially in 1858 Click to show or hide the answer
Variety of Curaçao (orange liqueur) – invented 1849 by Edouard Cointreau in Angers, France – used in cocktails such as Margaritas Click to show or hide the answer
White wine distilled with herbs, often drunk with gin as an aperitif; named from the German word for wormwood (although invented in Italy); popular brands include Martini, Cinzano, and Noilly Prat; the 'It' in 'Gin and It' Click to show or hide the answer
Created 1908 in Timperley, Cheshire, by J. N. Nichols & Co. (as Vim Tonic – a health tonic in cordial form); principal ingredients are grape, raspberry and blackcurrant juices Click to show or hide the answer
Cider maker based in Much Marcle, near Ledbury, Herefordshire since 1878: brands include Stowford Press, Old Rosie, Wyld Wood Click to show or hide the answer
Name comes from uisge beatha, the Gaelic translation of the Latin phrase aqua vitae (water of life), used to refer to distilled alcohol; variously rendered in English as uskebeaghe (1581), usquebaugh (1610), usquebath (1621), or usquebae (1715) Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017–18