Monkey

Quiz Monkey
What do you want to know?

You are here:

Food & Drink
Food

If you like my website, and/or if you've found it useful, please consider making a small donation to my Just Giving page, which I've set up just for this purpose. To begin with I'm collecting for a charity whose work I have benefitted from myself (and continue to do so): the British Heart Foundation. It would be great to raise £100 in the first month.

If you already have donated ... Thank You!

Food

When I come across a new dish (in a quiz context), I usually describe the dish and give its name as the answer – because this way I can (hopefully) cover all eventualities in one item. If setting questions, it's often better to name the dish and ask for the main ingredient – especially with the more exotic dishes.

Recommended daily energy intake for young adults, in kilocalories (kcal) (it's less for children and older people) Men Click to show or hide the answer
Women Click to show or hide the answer

Mars bar (standard) Weight Click to show or hide the answer
Energy content (kcal) Click to show or hide the answer

Biscuit named after the English surgeon (1764–1831) who developed it as an aid to digestion – adding sugar and caraway seeds to the recipe for ship's biscuit Click to show or hide the answer
Type of gelatine, made from seaweed Click to show or hide the answer
Cut of beef taken from over the bone of the rump Click to show or hide the answer
Pasta: slightly undercooked, firm to the bite Click to show or hide the answer
Kellogg's began importing two breakfast cereals into the UK in 1922: Corn Flakes and Click to show or hide the answer
The dried, unripe fruit of the Pimenta dioica tree, native to the Caribbean and Central America; also known as Jamaica pepper; a key ingredient of Jamaican jerk seasoning; name dates to 1621 and reflects the idea that its flavour combines those of cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves Click to show or hide the answer
Nut that gives marzipan its flavour Click to show or hide the answer
Characteristic flavour of the cake or pastry known as frangipane (FRAN'ji'pan) Click to show or hide the answer
Macaroons served with coffee in Italy Click to show or hide the answer
Main ingredient of Gentleman's Relish; also used in Lea & Perrins' Worcestershire Sauce Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's best'selling instant cold dessert – launched 1967 by Bird's Click to show or hide the answer
Oysters wrapped in bacon, on toast Click to show or hide the answer
Italian word for a starter or hors d'oeuvres Click to show or hide the answer
Probably the most widely available Italian rice variety outside Italy; commonly used for risotto and for rice pudding; named after a town in the Po valley, which is its main growing region Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Sweetener, discovered 1965, marketed worldwide as NutraSweet Click to show or hide the answer
Principal vegetable ingredient of moussaka (other than potato); known in Indian restaurants as 'brinjal' Click to show or hide the answer
Covered in butter, breadcrumbs (& grated cheese), grilled or baked Click to show or hide the answer
Main ingredient of guacamole Click to show or hide the answer
Said to be the most nutritious fruit, and to have the highest calorific value; 60% more potassium than bananas; rich in vitamins B, E and K; most of the fat is mono–unsaturated (i.e. healthy), but one fruit contains 25% of the RDA of saturated fats Click to show or hide the answer
Arab dish of mashed aubergines, mixed with onions, tomatoes, olive oil and various seasonings, often used as a dip: name means "pampered daddy", possibly with reference to a member of a royal harem Click to show or hide the answer
Jewish ring–shaped hard bread roll, sprinkled with poppy or caraway seeds – the name is derived (via Yiddish) from an old German word for a ring or a bracelet Click to show or hide the answer
Water bath used to prevent overheating Click to show or hide the answer
Ice cream and sponge, covered in meringue and baked quickly Click to show or hide the answer
A mixture of sodium bicarbonate (a.k.a. baking soda) and cream of tartar Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional sweet pastry of Turkey and Arab countries (also popular in Greece): made of layers of filo dough, filled with chopped nuts and flavoured with syrup or honey Click to show or hide the answer
Name commonly used in America for a type of sausage derived from the Italian mortadella – a finely ground pork sausage containing cubes of lard, named after the capital city of the Italian Emilia–Romagna region (Bologna) – also used to mean nonsense or rubbish Click to show or hide the answer
Type of dish invented in Birmingham, England around 1980; name often said to mean "bucket", but more accurately describes the pot that the dish is cooked in Click to show or hide the answer
In Scotland, and also in Ireland and northern England: a flat cake made of oatmeal, barley meal, etc., usually baked on a griddle; the name is sometimes used (in Scotland) interchangeably with 'scone' Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional Welsh currant bread: name means 'spotted bread' Click to show or hide the answer
Double lamb chop, cut across the saddle (named after a town in south Yorkshire) Click to show or hide the answer
Herb used to flavour the Italian sauce pesto Click to show or hide the answer
Hard, dry biscuit, often eaten with cheese – named after its inventor and the city where he practised as a doctor Click to show or hide the answer
Oblong sponge cake of two different colours, usually covered in almond paste. Name is believed to be in honour of the marriage of Queen Victoria's granddaughter to one of the four Battenberg princes Click to show or hide the answer
Adzuki, pinto and lima are types of Click to show or hide the answer
Sauce made from egg–yolks, lemon juice or wine vinegar, butter, shallots, herbs and seasoning Click to show or hide the answer
Basic white sauce, made from a roux of butter and flour, cooked in milk Click to show or hide the answer
Classic French stew of beef braised in red wine, with garlic, onions, and mushrooms (and traditionally lardons – pieces of pork fat); comes from the Burgundy region, which gives it its name Click to show or hide the answer
English name for a fillet of beef, cooked in pastry Click to show or hide the answer
Main ingredient of borsch or borscht (Russian or Polish soup) Click to show or hide the answer
French term, meaning "kneaded butter", used for a mixture of butter and flour used to thicken soups and sauces; similar to a roux, but not cooked before use Click to show or hide the answer
South African term for dried lean meat – Dutch 'buttock tongue' Click to show or hide the answer
Literally 'twice cooked' (from the French) Click to show or hide the answer
A Dorset Knob is a kind of
French term for a thick, creamy, highly seasoned soup made from puréed shellfish Click to show or hide the answer
Morcilla (Spain) Click to show or hide the answer
Briefly boiling meat or veg to whiten or preserve colour Click to show or hide the answer
Originated in the Middle Ages as a chicken dish, made with milk, rice and sugar, considered to be particularly suitable for the sick; nowadays, a pudding made with milk, sugar and thickening (e.g. gelatin); name is French for 'white [dish]' (literally 'white eat') Click to show or hide the answer
Russian pancake, served with spread (e.g. butter and/or jam) or fillings such as caviar Click to show or hide the answer
Herring, smoked then gutted (cf. Kipper) Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional hard, crumbly blue cheese made near Sturminster Newton, Dorset, from skimmed cows' milk Click to show or hide the answer
Polony, boloney or baloney is an Anglicisation of Click to show or hide the answer
Dried salted bummalo Click to show or hide the answer
Brown sauce, flavoured with wine and sometimes mushrooms Click to show or hide the answer
Provencal chowder made famous by Thackeray's appreciative ballad Click to show or hide the answer
A bundle of herbs – typically thyme, bay and parsley – sealed in a muslin bag or tied together with string, and used in the preparation of soups, stews or stock Click to show or hide the answer
Irish dish of fried potatoes – particularly associated with the north–western counties; sometimes known as 'potato bread' Click to show or hide the answer
Potted meat from a pig's head Click to show or hide the answer
Pumpernickel and taboon are types of Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Grissini (Italy) Click to show or hide the answer
Scottish meat & onion pie, similar to a Cornish pasty Click to show or hide the answer
Cut of meat, particularly beef, from the animal's breast – consisting of the pectoral muscles Click to show or hide the answer
American word for grilling Click to show or hide the answer
Sauce of melted butter, salt, pepper, lemon juice and sieved hard boiled eggs: often served with asparagus Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional British dish of left–over vegetables (especially potatoes and cabbage), pan–fried Click to show or hide the answer
Similar dishes include colcannon (from Ireland) and rumbeldethumps (Scottish Borders)
Welsh rarebit with a poached egg (some sources say more toast) on top Click to show or hide the answer
Fish that is dried and salted to make Bombay duck Click to show or hide the answer
Name believed to come, via Latin, from the Greek words for "cow" and "cheese" (bous and turon); "butyraceous" (beauty–raceous) means containing, like or producing Click to show or hide the answer
Italian dish with tomatoes, mushrooms, herbs and seasoning Click to show or hide the answer
Main stimulant in tea or coffee Click to show or hide the answer
Mock turtle soup is usually made from Click to show or hide the answer
Folded–over pizza Click to show or hide the answer
Soft, creamy French cheese, made from unpasteurised cows' milk; named after a small commune in Normandy; reputedly invented by farmer Marie Harel, with the advice of a priest from Brie Click to show or hide the answer
Small shaped pieces of bread, toasted and fried, garnished with delicacies such as caviar, smoked salmon Click to show or hide the answer
Semi–hard cheese, one of France's oldest, named after a departement of the Auvergne region Click to show or hide the answer
Syrup made by heating sugar gently until brown Click to show or hide the answer
Oxidation and browning of sugar by heating it to around 170°C Click to show or hide the answer
Beef and onion stew, cooked in beer Click to show or hide the answer
Italian appetizer of raw meat (originally beef), thinly sliced or pounded thin – possibly invented in Venice in 1950 (or in Milan); named after a 15th century Venetian painter Click to show or hide the answer
Irish Moss: edible seaweed, also named after the town near Waterford where it is plentiful Click to show or hide the answer
In French cuisine: dishes described as 'A la Crecy': include Click to show or hide the answer
Known in Indian cookery as gajar
Main protein in milk (and cheese) Click to show or hide the answer
In French cuisine: dishes described as Dubarry include Click to show or hide the answer
Known in Indian cookery as gobi
Hot, red pepper made from dried capsicum seeds and pods – named after the capital of French Guiana (an overseas Region of France) Click to show or hide the answer
Popular Latin American (particularly Peruvian) dish of raw fish, or other seafoods, marinated in citrus juices and spiced with chilli peppers; served with salad vegetables Click to show or hide the answer
Chilled pudding, said by some to be named after the consort of King George III Click to show or hide the answer
French name for a thick tenderloin steak, cut close to the filet mignon Click to show or hide the answer
Appenzeller, Bel Paese, Gorgonzola (Italy); Fynbo, Marbo, Samso, Tybo (Denmark); Caboc, Crowdie, Dunlop (Scotland), Limburger, Manchego (Spain), Monterey Jack, Perroche (Kent), Dolcelatte, Parmigiano–Reggiano, Feta, Edam, Gouda, Dorset Blue Vinney Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Added to a Bechamel sauce to make a Mornay sauce Click to show or hide the answer
'Paneer' is the most common Indian type of
Poached, glazed (and preserved in syrup) to make marrons glacés Click to show or hide the answer
'Murgh' on an Indian menu Click to show or hide the answer
Main ingredient of hummus; known in Indian cooking as 'chana' Click to show or hide the answer
Main ingredients of cock–a–leekie soup Click to show or hide the answer
Coffee substitute, known in France as endive Click to show or hide the answer
Inferno, fire candle, purple tiger, hot Mexican: varieties of Click to show or hide the answer
Sausage named after an Italian onion stew (from the Italian word for onion) Click to show or hide the answer
Pigs' intestines (or, less commonly, a cow), prepared as food (a type of offal) Click to show or hide the answer
Chinese dish of meat and vegetables, quickly fried, served with rice – widely believed to be of US origin, although there is evidence that it did in fact originate in China in the late 19th century; name is variously translated as 'bits and pieces', 'odds and ends', or 'mixed bits' Click to show or hide the answer
Spicy sausage, flavoured with paprika, originally from Spain and Portugal, later Mexico Click to show or hide the answer
Jamie Oliver was criticised in 2016 for including it in paella
Type of pastry used in éclairs, profiteroles, etc. Click to show or hide the answer
Soup made from fish with meat and vegetables, from a French word for a pot Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional Chinese dish of fried noodles – often (particularly in the West) with meat Click to show or hide the answer
Acid in oranges, lemons etc. Click to show or hide the answer
Countneck, littleneck, topneck, cherrystone, quahog (quaw–hog) (in ascending order of size) Click to show or hide the answer
Ghee (used in Indian and Malaysian cooking) Click to show or hide the answer
Round loaf with a cross in the top (named for Prince Albert) Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional name for the food colouring E120, which is obtained by crushing, boiling and drying a certain kind of insect fed on cactus Click to show or hide the answer
Main ingredient of taramasalata Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional Irish dish of potato and cabbage, butter, salt and pepper Click to show or hide the answer
Gazpacho Click to show or hide the answer
Name derived from the Dutch for cabbage salad Click to show or hide the answer
Dish of fruit preserved or stewed in syrup Click to show or hide the answer
North African dish of ground wheat flour (semolina), steamed with meat, vegetables etc. Click to show or hide the answer
"Dead men's fingers" are a body part that you would need to remove, if cooking Click to show or hide the answer
The Norfolk coastal town of Cromer is famous for its
Cream custard with a caramelised topping Click to show or hide the answer
French dessert of pancake, with a flambéed sauce of caramelised sugar, orange juice and a liqueur (usually Grand Marnier) – named after the dinner companion of the Prince of Wales (later Edward VII) for whom it was created (by accident) in 1895 Click to show or hide the answer
Said to have been introduced to France (from Austria) by Marie Antoinette; actually no reference in French cuisine before the mid–19th century, although probably of Viennese origin. (Also sometimes said to have been invented to celebrate the defeat of a Muslim army at Tours in 732, or the Turks at Vienna in 1683 or Buda in 1686.) 'Cornetto' in Italian Click to show or hide the answer
French snack dish of toasted cheese and ham Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional soup made of smoked (Finnan) haddock, onions and potatoes – named after a village on the Moray Firth, in north–east Scotland Click to show or hide the answer
American cooking: 240ml is known as a Click to show or hide the answer
More solid part of curdled milk Click to show or hide the answer
Thick, spicy stew made from pulses (typically lentils) in Indian cookery Click to show or hide the answer
Prunes wrapped in bacon and grilled Click to show or hide the answer
Sold by British fishmongers as "rock salmon" Click to show or hide the answer
Bosintang is a traditional Korean soup, said to be of declining popularity, made from Click to show or hide the answer
Stuffed vine leaves (Greece) Click to show or hide the answer
Shawarma is the Arabic name for a dish that is better known in English by the Turkish name Click to show or hide the answer
Indian dish, name means 'two onions' Click to show or hide the answer
Copra Click to show or hide the answer
Variety of wheat traditionally used for pasta Click to show or hide the answer
French dish: a finely chopped (minced) mixture of mushrooms or mushroom stems, onions, shallots, and herbs, sautéed in butter and reduced to a paste, used as a stuffing or pastry filler; said to be named after the French general and politician whose chef invented it in the 17th century Click to show or hide the answer
Pastry, originating in France in the 19th century – name is French for lightning Click to show or hide the answer
Can be split, chopped, fried or grilled, and served as 'spitchcock' (not to be confused with spatchcock) Click to show or hide the answer
Added to a croque monsieur to make a croque madame Click to show or hide the answer
Principal ingredient of the Italian dish frittata Click to show or hide the answer
American breakfast dish: two halves of what's known in the US as an English muffin, topped with ham or bacon, poached eggs, and Hollandaise sauce – the origin of the name is unclear (but has nothing to do with Benedict Allen) Click to show or hide the answer
Spanish stuffed bread or pastry: name basically means 'breaded' Click to show or hide the answer
Fried tortilla, filled with meat and served with chilli sauce (Mexico) Click to show or hide the answer
Salad vegetable related to chicory, and often confused with it Click to show or hide the answer
Umbles (as in 'eat umble pie') Click to show or hide the answer
Steak cut from between two ribs Click to show or hide the answer
Served between the fish and meat courses Click to show or hide the answer
When food additives are referred to as 'E numbers', the E stands for Click to show or hide the answer
Sponge pudding with a layer of apples at the bottom Click to show or hide the answer
Popular fast food of the Middle East, made from fava beans (broad beans) or chickpeas (or both), which are boiled, mashed and spiced, formed into balls and fried Click to show or hide the answer
Pasta in the shape of a bow tie (Italian for "butterflies") Click to show or hide the answer
Strong–smelling plant with a taste similar to aniseed, often used in fish dishes Click to show or hide the answer
Commonest cheese in Greece – most commonly used in Greek salads Click to show or hide the answer
French term for a cut of tenderloin steak – literally "cute fillet" or "dainty fillet" Click to show or hide the answer
Cut of beef used in a Porterhouse (Chateaubriand) steak Click to show or hide the answer
Wafer–thin pastry used to make cakes such as strudel and baklava Click to show or hide the answer
Kind of smoked haddock, probably named after a river (the Findon) in Scotland Click to show or hide the answer
French term for adding alcohol to a hot pan to produce a burst of flames Click to show or hide the answer
Preserved liver of specially–fattened goose or duck Click to show or hide the answer
Swiss dish of melted cheese into which bread (or other foodstuffs) are dipped Click to show or hide the answer
Filling for tarts and other pastries, made from or flavoured with almonds Click to show or hide the answer
Name used in Britain for bread that has been toasted on one side only, or (alternatively) dipped in beaten egg and lightly fried Click to show or hide the answer
French term for a stewed dish made with poultry or other meat, thickened with butter and cream or milk – often including vegetables Click to show or hide the answer
Sauté is a French term, meaning Click to show or hide the answer
Pan–fried dumpling of minced meat – popular in Denmark, Poland and Germany Click to show or hide the answer
Known in France as petit Suisse Click to show or hide the answer
Popular mediaeval dish made from boiled cracked wheat, served with meats such as venison; plays a major role in the plot of Hardy's The Mayor of Casterbridge Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional Egyptian soup, stew or paste made from fava beans (broad beans) – sometimes (ironically) described as a national dish Click to show or hide the answer
Added to mayonnaise to make aioli Click to show or hide the answer
Spanish soup, made with onions and tomatoes, served cold Click to show or hide the answer
Protein obtained from bones, horns and hooves Click to show or hide the answer
Anchovy paste produced by licence only in Elsenham, Essex Click to show or hide the answer
Clarified butter used in Indian cookery Click to show or hide the answer
A young cucumber, pickled and often flavoured with herbs (e.g. dill) Click to show or hide the answer
Made with cheese and leeks (or onions), fried in breadcrumbs: first mentioned in print by the English writer George Borrow in Wild Wales (1862); gained popularity during World War II due to the scarcity of meat Click to show or hide the answer
Small Italian dumplings, made of potato, flour or semolina Click to show or hide the answer
Chèvre (Crottin de Chavignol is the best–known variety): cheeses made from the milk of Click to show or hide the answer
Blue–veined cheese named after a town in Lombardy (near Milan) Click to show or hide the answer
The world's most popular cheese, according to cheese.com in 2017 ("accounting for 50 to 60 percent of the world's cheese consumption.") Named after the Dutch city where it's been made since at least the year 1184 Click to show or hide the answer
French word for strips of fish or chicken, often coated in breadcrumbs and fried Click to show or hide the answer
Spicy beef stew originating in Hungary; also uses onions, red pepper and paprika Click to show or hide the answer
Veronique (especially sole Veronique): with Click to show or hide the answer
Scandinavian dish of raw salmon, cured in sugar, salt and dill; name means "buried salmon" Click to show or hide the answer
Angelica: colour Click to show or hide the answer
Brought to Britain by the Reverend Gage Click to show or hide the answer
American porridge made from corn (maize) Click to show or hide the answer
Hard cheese traditionally used in fondues (along with a semi–hard cheese such as Emmental, Vacherin or raclette) Click to show or hide the answer
Dip or salad, of Aztec (Mexican) origin: made by mashing avocados with salt with a mortar and pestle; name comes from Nahuatl, the Aztec language, and means "avocado sauce" Click to show or hide the answer
South America (particularly Peru, Colombia, Ecuador): cuy is the meat of the Click to show or hide the answer
Stew or soup, popular in the southern United States – originating in Louisiana – taking its name from an African name for the okra; consists of a strongly flavored stock, okra, meat or shellfish, a thickener, and seasoning vegetables such as celery, bell peppers and onions Click to show or hide the answer
Bean used for baked beans Click to show or hide the answer
Spicy chilli–based paste, used as a condiment or ingredient in North African cooking Click to show or hide the answer
Type of loaf made originally in Lincolnshire, from stale bread and ground pork – the name is derived from a French word for entrails Click to show or hide the answer
Condiment, similar to Worcester sauce, made in Sheffield since the late 19th century Click to show or hide the answer
Whitebait are young ones; kippers and bloaters are smoked ones Click to show or hide the answer
Thick, pungent sauce, commonly used in Chinese cuisine as a glaze for meat, an addition to stir fries, or as dipping sauce: darkly coloured, sweet and salty; ingredients includes soy beans, red chillis, garlic, and often vinegar, Chinese five spice or sugar; the name is Chinese for seafood, but no seafood ingredients are included Click to show or hide the answer
Hot, emulsified sauce made from egg yolks, butter and lemon juice Click to show or hide the answer
The first product marketed by Henry John Heinz (1869) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Invented in 1887 by Richard "Stoney" Smith, originally of Stone, Staffordshire: a process for baking bread without removing the wheatgerm. Patented by Smith along with S. Fitton & Sons of Macclesfield, who milled the flour and sold it to bakers along with branded baking tins. See also Advertising and Foreign Words & Phrases (Misc) Click to show or hide the answer
Frappé: served with Click to show or hide the answer
Háarl, a dish of fermented and dried shark meat, is a national dish of Click to show or hide the answer
Skyr is a "cultured dairy product" (similar to yogurt), traditionally popular in
Indian dish: name means 'spicy food suitable for a diet' Click to show or hide the answer
Louisiana Creole dish of French and Spanish origin – similar to Spanish paella – consisting of meat and/or shellfish, vegetables and rice Click to show or hide the answer
Clear soup with shredded veg., or any shredded food (French) Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional breakfast dish of smoked fish, spiced rice, hard–boiled eggs Click to show or hide the answer
Middle–Eastern dish of baked lamb, stuffed with spiced rice and nuts Click to show or hide the answer
Rognons in France, riñones in Spain Click to show or hide the answer
Chicken fillets deep–fried and stuffed with garlic butter Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional Korean side dish, of fermented vegetables with a variety of seasonings; traditionally stored underground in jars during the summer months, to keep cool Click to show or hide the answer
Herring, gutted then smoked; invented (1843) by John Woodger of Seahouses, Northumberland (cf. Bloater) Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional Greek dish of lamb, marinated in garlic and lemon juice and slow–baked on the bone – named after a type of highwayman who opposed Turkish oppression during the Ottoman Empire (literally a thief or robber, from the same root as kleptomania) Click to show or hide the answer
Indian sweet similar to ice cream, made from yogurt and iced water, flavoured with salt and pepper, sugar or fruit Click to show or hide the answer
Type of chocolate sponge cake, popular as a dessert in Australia, New Zealand and South Africa; said to be named after the Governor of Queensland (1896–1901) Click to show or hide the answer
French name for the Dublin Bay prawn (a.k.a. Norway lobster or scampi) Click to show or hide the answer
Type of cheese named after a state of the Holy Roman Empire – provinces of Belgium and the Netherlands now have the same name (as the state) Click to show or hide the answer
Served with Newberg or Thermidor sauce (the latter named after a month in the French Republican calendar) Click to show or hide the answer
Cut of beef from between the rump and the fore rib Click to show or hide the answer
Soft, mild blue cheese with an edible white rind, created in 1982 by an advertising agency working for the UK Government's Milk Marketing Board (under the Dairy Crest brand), to compete with French cheeses such as brie; initially successful, but production ceased in 1992 in the face of falling demand Click to show or hide the answer
Spice obtained from the seed covering of nutmeg Click to show or hide the answer
A salad of fruit or vegetables, cut into cubes (of approx. 4 mm); named after a region of Europe, said to have had an extremely diverse population in ancient times Click to show or hide the answer
Cake named after the wine with which it's traditionally eaten Click to show or hide the answer
Acid found in rotten fruit Click to show or hide the answer
Named by its French inventor (Hippolyte Mege–Mouriez) after the Greek for pearl (margarites), 1869 Click to show or hide the answer
Herb, closely related to oregano, Latin name Origanum hortensis Click to show or hide the answer
Liquid in which meat is steeped to flavour and tenderise Click to show or hide the answer
Introduced 1902, made from waste products in the brewing industry; name is a French word for a cooking pot Click to show or hide the answer
Sweet wine, traditionally used in zabaglione Click to show or hide the answer
Confectionery made from almonds, eggs, sugar and water Click to show or hide the answer
Cream cheese from Lombardy – a principal ingredient of tiramisu Click to show or hide the answer
Said to originate in, and be named after, the capital of Minorca (Mahon) Click to show or hide the answer
Known as polpette or polpettine in Italy, pulpety in Poland, klopse in Germany, albondigas in Spain, kofta (Persian for "minced") in the Middle East and India Click to show or hide the answer
In Quebec, a tourtière or tortière is a kind of Click to show or hide the answer
Pudding named after an Australian opera singer Click to show or hide the answer
Italian soup, made with vegetables – typically beans, onions, celery, carrots, tomatoes – often with pasta or rice; name means roughly "the one soup" or "the big soup" Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional Japanese seasoning, made from fermented soybeans, used for sauces and spreads, pickling vegetables or meats, and mixing with dashi soup stock to make the soup to which it gives its name (a Japanese culinary staple) Click to show or hide the answer
Internationally–popular dessert with a crumbly chocolate crust, filled with chocolate mousse (or similar); named after the US state where it may have originated (probably some time after World War II) Click to show or hide the answer
Pudding made from meringue and chestnut purée Click to show or hide the answer
American term for a fried ham and Swiss cheese sandwich Click to show or hide the answer
By–product of the refinement of sugar, used as a food additive, also sold as a health supplement, and one of the basic ingredients of rum Click to show or hide the answer
Classic Greek dish of minced lamb, potatoes, aubergines and tomato, topped with a cheese sauce Click to show or hide the answer
Italian cheese made from buffalo's milk – name comes from the Italian for "to cut" Click to show or hide the answer
Invented around 1900, for patients in his hospital, by Swiss Dr. Maximilian Bircher–Benner; name derived from a German word meaning paste or purée Click to show or hide the answer
Curried meat soup, popular with the British in India; name means "pepper water" in Tamil Click to show or hide the answer
Porcini (from its Italian name); a.k.a. cep (from its Catalan or French name), king bolete, or penny bun Click to show or hide the answer
Said to have been invented (in its modern form) by Mrs. Clements of Durham, 1720; reputed to have been a great favourite of George I Click to show or hide the answer
Scampi originally came from Click to show or hide the answer
Can mean either a chocolate flavoured with hazelnut or a small, round, boneless piece of lamb (French for "hazelnut") Click to show or hide the answer
Japanese name for edible seaweed of the red algae genus Porphyra: often used in sushi, sometimes as a wrapping Click to show or hide the answer
Camembert comes from Click to show or hide the answer
Phrase coined by Harpers & Queen magazine, 1975 Click to show or hide the answer
Edible internal organs of meat, poultry and game Click to show or hide the answer
Vegetable also known as ladies' fingers, 'bindi' in Indian cooking, and gumbo in the Southern US Click to show or hide the answer
Ciabatta (Italian bread) gets its distinctive flavour from Click to show or hide the answer
Á la broche or en brochette Click to show or hide the answer
Essential ingredient of soubise sauce Click to show or hide the answer
Lyonnaise: cooked with Click to show or hide the answer
Vanilla comes (naturally) from Click to show or hide the answer
Herb related to marjoram: often used in tomato sauces, particularly on pizza Click to show or hide the answer
Italian stew of veal and white wine Click to show or hide the answer
The coastal town of Whitstable, in Kent, is famous for its Click to show or hide the answer
A carpetbagger steak (Australian dish) is stuffed with Click to show or hide the answer
Classic Spanish rice dish, typically garnished with vegetables, seafood and/or meat Click to show or hide the answer
Crêpe: French word for a Click to show or hide the answer
Traditionally eaten in English–speaking countries (although not particularly in the United States) on Shrove Tuesday, the day before Ash Wednesday, giving the day its less formal name Click to show or hide the answer
Italian belly pork (bacon), salt cured and spiced – name is a diminutive of the word for belly Click to show or hide the answer
Classic Northumberland dish of layered potato, onions and cheese, slow– cooked in a pan until golden and crispy Click to show or hide the answer
En papillotte: cooked in Click to show or hide the answer
Characteristic spice of goulash: made by grinding red or green peppers Click to show or hide the answer
Heat in liquid until partially cooked Click to show or hide the answer
Cake traditionally eaten in Yorkshire and Lancashire on Guy Fawkes Night. Made from flour, oatmeal, black treacle (molasses), fat (traditionally lard) and ginger Click to show or hide the answer
Bigoli, bucatini, caserecci, cavatappi, chitarra, conchiglie, farfalle, fettucini, gigli, linguine, lumache, orecchiette, pansotti, penne, riccini, rigati, rigatoni, strozzapreti, trofie, vermicelli: types of Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Alfredo, carbonara Click to show or hide the answer
En croute: French term, meaning cooked in Click to show or hide the answer
Dessert named after a Russian ballerina Click to show or hide the answer
Crème St. Germain Click to show or hide the answer
Groundnut, and goober in the USA, are alternative names for the Click to show or hide the answer
Said to have been invented at the Savoy Hotel, London, by French chef Escoffier; named after an Australian soprano Click to show or hide the answer
Classic pudding of pears and ice cream with chocolate sauce Click to show or hide the answer
Polymer derived from plant cell walls, especially from ripe fruit, which makes jam set Click to show or hide the answer
Italian sauce, originating in Genoa, made with basil, crushed garlic, pine kernels and Parmesan cheese Click to show or hide the answer
Term used in the UK for small sausages wrapped in bacon and roasted, especially to accompany roast turkey; in the USA, a similar term refers to sausages baked in various types of dough Click to show or hide the answer
Brochet (in a French restaurant) Click to show or hide the answer
North–country name for a crumpet Click to show or hide the answer
A sardine is a young Click to show or hide the answer
Known in Cornwall as 'fair maids' Click to show or hide the answer
Hot sauce, originating in the Portuguese colonies of south–west Africa, from where it was exported to Goa; name comes from the local word for pepper, repeated for emphasis! Click to show or hide the answer
Tropical fruit of which the banana is a variety (other varieties are harder and less sweet, and cooked rather than eaten raw; a staple diet in most tropical regions) Click to show or hide the answer
Essential (alcoholic) ingredient of Cumberland sauce Click to show or hide the answer
In Indian cooking; 'aloo' means Click to show or hide the answer
Parmentier: cooked with Click to show or hide the answer
Spanish omelette: principal ingredient (apart from eggs!) Click to show or hide the answer
Confection of almonds (or other nuts) and caramelised sugar – possibly named after a 17th century French soldier and diplomat, by whose cook it may have been invented Click to show or hide the answer
Crevettes Click to show or hide the answer
Type of savoury biscuit, popular in Germany and the USA: comes in the form of a knot, said to represent hands folded in prayer; the three holes represent the Holy Trinity Click to show or hide the answer
Italian word for ham; particularly (in English) dry–cured and uncooked Click to show or hide the answer
Dried plum Click to show or hide the answer
German black bread made from coarse rye flour – name said by some to mean "farting devil" (pumpen ~ flatulent, Nickel ~ Old Nick) from difficulty of digestion Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional Thanksgiving Day dessert (USA) Click to show or hide the answer
Soft, low–fat curd cheese of Eastern Europe Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional British pudding: custard thickened with breadcrumbs, topped with jam and meringue Click to show or hide the answer
Creamed mixture of fish, chicken or meat, sometimes breadcrumbs, lightly bound with egg and poached; name used for any egg–shaped serving of food e.g. ice cream, sorbet or mashed potato Click to show or hide the answer
Fruit – similar to a pear – known in Portuguese as the marmelo, from which marmalade was originally made Click to show or hide the answer
Swiss dish of melted cheese which is scraped onto the diner's plate (cf. Fondue) Click to show or hide the answer
French word for a stew or casserole, from a word meaning "to revive the taste" Click to show or hide the answer
Popular dip or condiment in Indian cuisine, made from yogurt with cucumber or mint Click to show or hide the answer
Peppers, aubergines, courgettes, onions, tomatoes: main ingredients of Click to show or hide the answer
Steak tartare Click to show or hide the answer
Prairie Oyster Click to show or hide the answer
Rogan josh Click to show or hide the answer
Cumberland sauce: main ingredient Click to show or hide the answer
Boiling to evaporate water and increase concentration Click to show or hide the answer
Curdled milk from the stomachs of unweaned calves – often used in the production of cheese Click to show or hide the answer
Carolina, Java, Basmati: types of Click to show or hide the answer
Italian whey cheese – name means "re–cooked" Click to show or hide the answer
Herring fillet marinated in vinegar and rolled round chopped onions Click to show or hide the answer
Famous blue cheese, made in south–west France from ewes' milk, regulated by parliamentary decree since the 15th century and by an AOC label since 1925 Click to show or hide the answer
Mixture of flour and butter, used as the basis for many sauces Click to show or hide the answer
Middle–Eastern (Palestinian) stew of lentils, pomegranate seeds and aubergine: name is derived from the local (Hebrew?) name for the pomegranate Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Word used in Indan cooking for a combination of green vegetables – typically including spinach, and any or all of mustard leaf, collard greens, basella, etc. Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Type of chocolate cake, named after the hotel in Vienna where it was first served Click to show or hide the answer
Highly–valued spice obtained from the flower of a species of crocus Click to show or hide the answer
Greek name for a small frying pan, and hence any dish prepared in one – particularly one of cheese Click to show or hide the answer
Corned (as in beef) Click to show or hide the answer
Invented so that an English nobleman could eat while playing cards Click to show or hide the answer
Japanese delicacy of raw, very fresh fish, thinly sliced, served with a dipping sauce and a light garnish Click to show or hide the answer
South–east Asian dish of meat or seafood cooked on skewers, traditionally (but not necessarily) served with peanut sauce Click to show or hide the answer
German dish of cabbage pickled in brine – renamed "Liberty cabbage" in the USA during World War I Click to show or hide the answer
Shellfish used in coquilles St. Jacques Click to show or hide the answer
Misleading name for a dish of scrambled eggs on toast, topped with anchovies or anchovy paste (or Gentlemen's Relish) Click to show or hide the answer
Devised in 1912 to measure the piquancy (hotness) of chilli peppers Click to show or hide the answer
Oeufs brouillé Click to show or hide the answer
Laver (used in Wales to make laver bread; known in Japan as nori, in Korea as kim or gim) is a type of Click to show or hide the answer
Particles of hard, fine wheat that don't pass into flour for milling Click to show or hide the answer
Variety of orange said to be best for marmalade Click to show or hide the answer
Also known as the bigarade (from a Provençal word for 'variegated'), the name also used for a rich sauce typically served with duck
In an Italian restaurant: pesce Martello Click to show ode the answer
Dish of skewered meat, often with vegetables: popular throughout southern Asia, the Middle East and eastern Europe, and a staple of curry restaurants, where it's often served sizzling on a hot cast iron dish; name comes from the Turkish word for a skewer Click to show ode the answer
Pecorino (Italy); Roquefort (France – blue–veined): cheeses made from the milk of Click to show or hide the answer
Mock Turtle soup is made from Click to show or hide the answer
Alcoholic ingredient of Newberg sauce Click to show or hide the answer
Seasonal fruit cake for Mothering Sunday and Easter Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional fruit scone from north east England (particularly Northumberland), cooked on a griddle or frying pan, said to be named after the noise it makes when being cooked Click to show or hide the answer
Fumade Click to show or hide the answer
Food associated with the Scottish town of Arbroath ("smokies") Click to show or hide the answer
Selection of hot and cold foods served as a buffet (Swedish) Click to show or hide the answer
Russian soup based on pickled cucumbers, with either meat, fish or mushrooms Click to show or hide the answer
Meat product: developed in the 1930s by the Hormel Company of Austin, Minnesota; gained worldwide popularity during World War II Click to show or hide the answer
Known in Indian cooking as palak (cf. Saag) Click to show or hide the answer
(Normally) used to colour pasta green
Eggs Florentine includes (vegetable)
Scallions Click to show or hide the answer
Calamari is the name used in cooking, especially around the Mediterranean, for Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional Cornish pie with pilchards' heads sticking out of the crust Click to show or hide the answer
Fricassee Click to show or hide the answer
Cheese named after a village in Cambridgeshire – where it was first sold – but actually made in Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Click to show or hide the answer
Cheese made at Dymock, near Gloucester, since 1972: production involves immersion in a perry made from a locally–bred pear, which gives the cheese its name. Made famous by Nick Park in Wallace and Gromit: the Curse of the Were–Rabbit (2005) Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional German bread–like fruit cake, particularly associated with Christmas Click to show or hide the answer
Haggis is made from the heart, liver and lungs of a sheep – encased (traditionally) in the Click to show or hide the answer
Farci Click to show or hide the answer
Caviar comes from the Click to show or hide the answer
Fat from the loins or around the kidneys of cows or sheep Click to show or hide the answer
Muscovado is a type of Click to show or hide the answer
Japanese dish of rice topped with seafood or meat – in Japan the name refers only to the rice Click to show or hide the answer
The pancreas, when served as food Click to show or hide the answer
Ris de veau, in French cuisine Click to show or hide the answer
South–East Asian bird whose nest is used in bird's nest soup Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Hot red sauce, invented 1868 by Edward McIlhenny, and still produced by his family firm on Avery Island, Louisiana (not actually an island); named after a Mexican state Click to show or hide the answer
Paste made from ground sesame seeds – a major ingredient of hummus Click to show or hide the answer
Slow–cooked Moroccan stew – named after the clay pot (with a conical lid) in which it's cooked Click to show or hide the answer
Starch obtained from the root of the tropical cassava plant: a staple food in many parts of the world; used as a thickening agent in various dishes Click to show or hide the answer
Thick white sauce made from mayonnaise and pickled vegetables (cucumber, capers and chives) and parsley – commonly served with fish and seafood Click to show or hide the answer
E102: a yellow food additive, thought to contribute towards hyperactivity in children Click to show or hide the answer
Sally Lunn; huffkin (Kent – often flavoured with hops) Click to show or hide the answer
Classic Japanese technique of frying food (esp. seafood and vegetables) in batter Click to show or hide the answer
Japanese method of cooking on an iron griddle: literally "grilled (or fried) on an iron plate" Click to show or hide the answer
A Rocky Mountain oyster, or prairie oyster, is a bull's Click to show or hide the answer
Style of cooking, derived from styles originating on either side of the Rio Grande Click to show or hide the answer
Beurre Manie: used for Click to show or hide the answer
Classic Italian dessert, of sponge fingers dipped in coffee, layered with a mixture of egg yolks, mascarpone (cheese) and sugar – name means "pick me up" Click to show or hide the answer
Unfermented soya–bean curd (Japan) Click to show or hide the answer
Love apple: old name for a Click to show or hide the answer
Passata: puréed, sieved, uncooked Click to show or hide the answer
Thin Mexican pancake made from Maize flour Click to show or hide the answer
Meat dish named after a composer Click to show or hide the answer
Zuppa Inglese (English soup): Italian name for Click to show or hide the answer
Blanket, honeycomb and book are the three main types of Click to show or hide the answer
Sniffed out by pigs in France (especially Perigord); the largest ever specimen (weighing 4.16 pounds) was sold at Sotheby's in New York, in 2014, for $61,250 Click to show or hide the answer
Rahat lokum (loukoum); or simply lokum Click to show or hide the answer
Member of the ginger family, known as haldi in Indian cooking; used as a cheaper alternative to saffron, to give the characteristic yellow colour to rice, picalilli etc.; sometimes known as 'Indian saffron' Click to show or hide the answer
Greek dip of yoghurt, chopped cucumber and mint Click to show or hide the answer
Meat used in osso bucco and wiener schnitzel Click to show or hide the answer
Australian spread made from yeast extract, similar to British Marmite but less strongly flavoured – first marketed 1923 Click to show or hide the answer
Classic French soup made from leeks, potatoes, chicken stock and cream, traditionally served cold; (partly) named after a spa town in central France Click to show or hide the answer
Salad of diced apples, celery and walnut, with mayonnaise – named after the New York hotel where it was first made Click to show or hide the answer
Name, derived from a Cantonese term for pastry, for a spiced pork dumpling, usually served in soup Click to show or hide the answer
What makes popcorn pop? Click to show or hide the answer
Muktuk (a traditional Inuit dish) Click to show or hide the answer
Semolina is made from Click to show or hide the answer
The liquid that remains after milk has been curdled and strained Click to show or hide the answer
Used to colour Red Windsor cheese Click to show or hide the answer
Cornish cheese, wrapped in nettle leaves to form a rind while maturing; name is the name of the couple that gave the recipe to the sole producers, spelt backwards Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Unicellular fungus used in baking and brewing Click to show or hide the answer
Produced by bacterial fermentation of milk Click to show or hide the answer
Dessert of whipped egg yolks, sugar and marsala, served hot Click to show or hide the answer
Outer rind of a citrus fruit, used as flavouring Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017