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General
Ceremonies and Officials

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Maundy Money
Gun Salutes
Other

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Ceremonies and Officials

Maundy Money

Recipients of Maundy money (since the reign of Henry IV) Click to show or hide the answer

Special Maundy money was first minted in the reign of Click to show or hide the answer
Office dating back to 1103, whose holder is responsible for overseeing the distribution of Maundy money Click to show or hide the answer

Gun Salutes

Occasions when a 21–gun salute is traditionally fired:

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20 extra guns (41 in total) are fired in the Royal Parks (Hyde Park and Green Park); 62 guns are fired at the Tower of London.

Other

Ceremony of conferring a knighthood Click to show or hide the answer
Civic dignitary next in rank to the Mayor (now little used) Click to show or hide the answer
Popular name for the Yeoman Warders (of the Tower of London) Click to show or hide the answer
Chief Magistrate and leader of the Republic of Venice, c. 700 – 1797; celebrated the symbolic marriage of the republic to the sea, each Ascension Day, by casting a ring from the state barge (the bucentaur) Click to show or hide the answer
Represents the sovereign in a Dominion Click to show or hide the answer
Performs ambassadorial duties in one Commonwealth country on behalf of another Click to show or hide the answer
Certain German princes were known (from the middle ages until 1806) as Electors, because they elected the Click to show or hide the answer
The Queen's household: (top three posts, in descending order) Click to show or hide the answer
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Represents the Sovereign in a county Click to show or hide the answer
Admiral of the Port of London Click to show or hide the answer
Scottish equivalent of a (Lord) Mayor Click to show or hide the answer
Ceremonial office held by the Lordship of Scrivelsby, Lincs Click to show or hide the answer
Right Reverend Click to show or hide the answer
Captured by Edward I in 1296 as spoils of war, and fitted into the Coronation Chair (a.k.a. King Edward's Chair or St. Edward's Chair) at Westminster Abbey; used since then at the coronations of English and British monarchs; named after the Abbey where it was previously kept, to be used in Scottish coronations Click to show or hide the answer
Also known as the Stone of Destiny, Jacob's Pillow Stone, the Tanist Stone, or (primarily in England) the Coronation Stone
Stolen from Westminster Abbey on Christmas Day 1950 by a group of Scottish students, who accidentally broke it in two; they took it to Scotland, where it was repaired and left on the altar of Arbroath Abbey; it was returned to Westminster in April 1951
Returned to Scotland in 1996 (on the 700th anniversary of its capture) and kept with the Scottish crown jewels at Edinburgh Castle, on the understanding that it will be returned to Westminster for future coronations
Placed on the head of the sovereign during the Coronation of a British sovereign Click to show or hide the answer

The three names of the pointless sword borne before the sovereign at coronations are:

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Additional title held by the Governor–General of India, from 1858 to 1947 Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017