Monkey

Quiz Monkey
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Crafts

People

London silversmith, said to be one of England's finest: took over the family business following the death of her husband John in 1760; retired in 1790, and was succeeded by her sons Peter and Jonathan; the company closed in 1843 Click to show or hide the answer
18th century English furniture maker: work characterised by the use of Chinese and Gothic motifs, cabriole legs, and massive carving (cf. Hepplewhite) Click to show or hide the answer
Ceramic artist, born Tunstall, Staffs 1899; active 1922–63; famous for her brightly–coloured Art Deco designs, often under the generic name 'Bizarre Ware' Click to show or hide the answer
Russian jeweller: famous for the ornamental easter eggs commissioned by Tsars Alexander III and Nicholas II, as gifts for their wives and mothers, from 1885 to 1917; the company was founded in St. Petersburg in 1842 by his father, Gustav (a German immigrant from what is now Estonia) Click to show or hide the answer
18th–century furniture maker, based in Lancaster; company merged with Waring of Liverpool in 1903 Click to show or hide the answer
Tapestry factory in Paris, founded in the 16th century – named after the family that founded the business – gave its name to the nearby Metro station Click to show or hide the answer
18th century English furniture maker: work characterised by lightness, grace, and curved lines, including oval and shield–shaped open chair backs (cf. Chippendale) Click to show or hide the answer
French glass designer, 1860–1945, founded a firm that is still active Click to show or hide the answer
English potter: founded an earthenware factory in Stoke–on–Trent in 1793; was in partnership with Joseph Poulson from c. 1796, but carried on alone following Poulson's death in 1808; produced standard domestic tableware, but is most closely associated with the willow pattern Click to show or hide the answer
Began as a designer for Staffordshire pottery manufacturers James Macintyre & Co. Ltd., Stoke–on–Trent, in 1897; made his name with Florian Ware; set up his own company and factory in Burslem, 1912, after Macintyre's closed down his studio; closely associated with the London store Liberty; influenced by art nouveau Click to show or hide the answer
Produced the first bone china, by adding bone ash to his porcelain mix, c. 1800 Click to show or hide the answer
Furniture maker, based in Kilburn, North Yorkshire (died 1955): inspired by the Arts & Crafts movement, almost all of his pieces include a carved mouse, giving him the nickname Mouseman; his workshop is now operated by his descendants Click to show or hide the answer
Arguably the most famous potter of all time: born Burslem, Staffordshire, in 1730; set up in business in 1754, established the Etruria Works in 1769; had his first major commercial success with Black Basalt ware, inspired by Etruscan archaeological finds; had his leg amputated, probably as a result of a childhood smallpox episode which affected his knee; persuaded Queen Charlotte to let him name a range of pottery that she had bought "Queen's Ware"; made the Green Frog Service for Empress Catherine of Russia, now on display in the Hermitage Museum, in 1774; most famous today for jasperware, with overlaid white decoration on a variety of colours, the best–known of which is pale blue. Grandfather of Charles Darwin (his daughter married the son of Erasmus Darwin), and great–great–grandfather of Ralph Vaughan Williams. A prominent anti–slavery campaigner, he produced the famous medallion with the inscription "Am I not a man and a brother?" in 1787. Died in 1795 aged 64 Click to show or hide the answer

Other

1920s and 30s: style characterised by geometrical form and bright metal surfaces Click to show or hide the answer
Type of wood from which snooker, billiard and pool cues are traditionally made Click to show or hide the answer
Short, pointed tool used by a shoemaker to make holes in leather Click to show or hide the answer
Producing designs on cloth by waxing areas not to be dyed (Indonesia etc.) Click to show or hide the answer
Pottery that is fired but not glazed Click to show or hide the answer
Travelling pedlar who turned beech wood to make chairs, etc. Click to show or hide the answer
Japanese art of growing miniature trees Click to show or hide the answer
A brooch or ring with a portrait carved in relief Click to show or hide the answer
Chinese technique of soldering metal outlines onto a metal surface and filling the resultant cells with vitreous enamel paste Click to show or hide the answer
Jigger, buzz, flagging iron, round shaver, adze, mallet: used by a Click to show or hide the answer
Red glass made by adding gold salts or colloidal gold to molten glass (a.k.a. gold ruby glass) Click to show or hide the answer
To dress tanned leather – also to rub down and dress a horse Click to show or hide the answer
Type of fabric (silk, wool, linen, cotton or synthetic) named after a Middle Eastern capital city Click to show or hide the answer
André Planché, a Huguenot immigrant from Saxony, founded a porcelain factory around 1750 which has been known ever since for its fine bone china, in (English midland town – a city since 1977) Click to show or hide the answer
Used to hold the unspun fibres, in spinning (the spindle holds the spun yarn) Click to show or hide the answer
Coloured, powdered glass, fixed to a metal surface by firing Click to show or hide the answer
Prattware, majolica Click to show or hide the answer
Burin: the essential tool used in Click to show or hide the answer
Knitting style said to originate from survivors of the Spanish Armada Click to show or hide the answer
Drawing knife, driving hammer, pincers, pritchell: used by a Click to show or hide the answer
Ornaments of fine gold, silver or copper wire, twisted into patterns Click to show or hide the answer
Ikebana is the Japanese art of; Rikka is a more sophisticated style, now obsolete Click to show or hide the answer
Bookbinding: discoloration of pages (typically in spots) caused by chemical changes in the paper – name taken from the characteristic reddish–brown colour Click to show or hide the answer
Embroidery stitch where the thread is wound round the needle and re–threaded through the same point Click to show or hide the answer
Solution of shellac in alcohol (or meths) used by furniture makers Click to show or hide the answer
Knitting ("in the flat"): all rows knitted, or (less commonly) all purled. (cf. Stocking stitch) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Designed and manufactured in the late 19th century by J. G. Beard, at his leather shop in the City of Westminster; named by Beard after a former prime minister, of whom he was an avid admirer Click to show or hide the answer
Millefiori ornaments are made from Click to show or hide the answer
Collects a gob on the end of a punty Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Sans–serif typeface, developed in 1957 by the Swiss typeface designer Max Miedinger Click to show or hide the answer
Coarse fabric, usually made from jute or hemp, traditionally used to make sacks; known in the USA and Canada as burlap Click to show or hide the answer
Violin bows: strung with Click to show or hide the answer
Incised carving (opposite of cameo) Click to show or hide the answer
Wedgwood's most famous line, with a white design in relief on a background most famously of pale blue Click to show or hide the answer
Japanese art of folding and cutting paper (cf. Origami) Click to show or hide the answer
Brussels and Antwerp in Belgium, and Honiton (Devon) and Nottingham in England, are famous for making Click to show or hide the answer
Mechlin Lappet, Venetian rose–point, Genoese, Old Honiton, Modern Duchesse: types of
Applying layers of sap (from the Rhus verniciflua tree) to wooden artefacts Click to show or hide the answer
Cutting, polishing and engraving stones (especially precious ones) – also someone who does it Click to show or hide the answer
A cordwainer traditionally works (or worked) with Click to show or hide the answer
London's ancient and modern trade associations and guilds (almost all of which are styled the "Worshipful Company of ... " the relevant craft, trade or profession) Click to show or hide the answer
More correct name for a grandfather clock Click to show or hide the answer
Craft of knotting cord or string in patterns to make decorative items Click to show or hide the answer
Principal wood in which Chippendale worked Click to show or hide the answer
Earthenware decorated with brightly–coloured glaze and fired for a second time; named (via Italian) after the Mediterranean island where it was first imported from trhe Middle East Click to show or hide the answer
Decorating furniture by inlaying coloured woods in the surface Click to show or hide the answer
Town near Dresden, in eastern Germany, famous for its fine porcelain (marked with a crossed swords motif) – including the so–called Dresden porcelain Click to show or hide the answer
Japanese art of carving delicate ornaments, hung from a sash, used to carry things in (instead of pockets) – traditionally, most often from ivory Click to show or hide the answer
Japanese art of folding paper without cutting (cf. Kirigami) Click to show or hide the answer
An amalgam of gold and mercury, applied to bronze artefacts to imitate gold; or (more recently) an alloy of copper and zinc (sometimes with the addition of tin) used for the same purpose; or any gilt metal or imitation gold Click to show or hide the answer
Textile pattern, originally from Kashmir, but named after the Scottish town where it was copied Click to show or hide the answer
Material for writing on, made from processed animal skin (most commonly calfskin, sheepskin, or goatskin): its name evolved (via Latin and French) from the name of the city of Pergamon, which was a thriving centre of its production during the Hellenistic period (but not, contrary to legend, where it was invented) Click to show or hide the answer
'Screever' is a term used in Britain for a Click to show or hide the answer
Stitching on canvas with more than 22 holes per inch (hpi – in practice, more than 18 hpi) Click to show or hide the answer
Printing: twelve points make one Click to show or hide the answer
Famous Roman cameo glass vase, believed to date to the time of Jesus, housed in the British museum since 1810: famously smashed by impoverished Irish student William Lloyd (real name probably Mulcahy) in 1845 Click to show or hide the answer
Type of earthenware, decorated in relief, named after a family of Staffordshire potters working in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries Click to show or hide the answer
Knitting: the basic alternative to a knit (or plain) stitch: when the yarn is passed through the previous loop from above, instead of from below Click to show or hide the answer
English furniture style of 1700–20 (USA 1720–70), characterised by unencumbered curves, walnut veneer and the cabriole leg Click to show or hide the answer
American pottery style of soft cream or yellow ware, dipped or spattered with a brown glaze before firing Click to show or hide the answer
Jute, coir, manila, flax: used by a Click to show or hide the answer
Container used to protect delicate pottery in the kiln – a corruption of 'safeguard' Click to show or hide the answer
Things carved (generally by sailors) from seashells, bone or ivory Click to show or hide the answer
A cordwainer, traditionally, made Click to show or hide the answer
Satin was originally woven from Click to show or hide the answer
Applying adhesive paste to a wall before papering Click to show or hide the answer
Mixture of clay and water, used in ceramics (for various purposes, including decoration) Click to show or hide the answer
Maiden, mother–of–all, footman: parts of a Click to show or hide the answer
Knitting ("in the flat"): knitting and purling alternate rows Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Processing animal skins to make leather Click to show or hide the answer
Technique for crafting a particularly durable type of lace by hand, using a series of knots and loops – often thought to refer to lace–making in general Click to show or hide the answer
Needlework: the simplest and most versatile needlepoint stitch Click to show or hide the answer
Type of earthenware: name is Italian for 'cooked earth'; typically brownish–red in colour due to the iron content of the clay Click to show or hide the answer
Created for the Times newspaper in 1932 by Victor Lardent, under the direction of Stanley Morison Click to show or hide the answer
Clipping living plants into ornamental shapes Click to show or hide the answer
Small objects made of wood – term introduced in the 1960s by collector Edward Pinto Click to show or hide the answer
Fine parchment made from the skin of a lamb, calf or kid, used as paper and in bookbinding: since 1850, Acts of Parliament have been printed on Click to show or hide the answer
Italy's Amati family (Cremona, ~ 1550 – 1700) were famous for making Click to show or hide the answer
A wainwright was someone who made Click to show or hide the answer
Stick shuttle or boat shuttle: used by a Click to show or hide the answer
Kalsomine and calcimine are alternative names for; distemper is an early form of Click to show or hide the answer
Most popular of various Chinese–inspired landscape patterns used on domestic housewares; probably created for Spode around 1790, but also closely associated with Thomas Minton Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2018