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Customs: UK

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Forms of Address
Signatures
Places
Other

Customs: UK

Forms of Address

Addressed as "Right Honourable": members of the Click to show or hide the answer
Cardinal Click to show or hide the answer
Ambassador Click to show or hide the answer
Non–royal Duke, or a bishop Click to show or hide the answer

The wife of a viceroy Click to show or hide the answer

Signatures

This style of question is less popular these days – probably falling, for many people, into the category labelled "Who cares?" – but they do still come up occasionally. They can be asked either way round, but if you were given an abbreviation and asked which Bishop wrote it after his name, if might be rather too easy. So I've listed them this way round:

Q: "What does the Bishop of ... write after his name to signify 'of ... '?" A:
Cambridge Click to show or hide the answer
Canterbury Click to show or hide the answer
Chester Click to show or hide the answer
Chichester Click to show or hide the answer
Durham Click to show or hide the answer
York Click to show or hide the answer
Edinburgh Click to show or hide the answer
Exeter Click to show or hide the answer
Norwich Click to show or hide the answer
Oxford Click to show or hide the answer
Peterborough Click to show or hide the answer
Truro Click to show or hide the answer
Winchester Click to show or hide the answer

For example, the Bishop of Norwich (at the time of writing) is Graham James; he signs "Graham Norvic."

These are the ones that are listed in Wikisource: Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary 1908 / List of Abbreviations. They are all abbreviations for terms ending with the suffix '–ensis'; for example, 'Cantab.' is an abbreviation for 'Cantabrigiensis', meaning 'of Cambridge'.

Places

Cakes and Ale ceremony: held annually since 1482 in (Suffolk town) Click to show or hide the answer
Market town in Essex, known for its four–yearly 'Flitch Trials', in which couples must convince a jury that, for a year and a day, they have never wished themselves unwed; if successful they are awarded a flitch of bacon Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Town in East Sussex, has an annual Pirate Day Click to show or hide the answer
Furry Dance Click to show or hide the answer
Up Helly Aa (torchlit procession and the burning of a replica Viking longship, marking the end of Christmas) is most closely associated with Click to show or hide the answer
Market town near Milton Keynes, but in Cambridgeshire, that's had an annual pancake race since 1445 Click to show or hide the answer
Lancashire city, granted the unique right by Henry II in 1179 to hold a 'Guild Merchant'. The Guild has been held ever since – every 20 years from 1542 to 1922, then every 20 years since 1952 (last in 2012) Click to show or hide the answer
Battle of the Flowers (held in August each year) Click to show or hide the answer
Village near Crawley, West Sussex, where the 'British and World Marbles Championship' has been held every year since 1932 – most recently on Good Friday Click to show or hide the answer

Other

Holy Thursday – when Beating the Bounds traditionally takes place Click to show or hide the answer
Annual festival held in Jersey on the second Thursday in August, since 1902 (when it was first held to celebrate the coronation of Edward VII) Click to show or hide the answer
Character depicted in the British equivalent of the American "Kilroy Was Here" graffito: typically shown peering over a wall to ask a question such as "Wot, no sugar?" Click to show or hide the answer
Traditionally believed to bring good luck at a wedding Click to show or hide the answer
Woking, Surrey, 1886: Britain's first (modern) Click to show or hide the answer
Used to record clowns' faces for copyright purposes Click to show or hide the answer
Became unlawful in England, in its traditional style, on the 18th of February 2005 Click to show or hide the answer
Type of fair held annually in Nottingham and Tavistock Click to show or hide the answer
Name used in the North of England for the practice of pulling grotesque faces Click to show or hide the answer
Married woman serving as chief attendant to a bride Click to show or hide the answer
First–footing takes place on Click to show or hide the answer
What shouldn't you eat if there's no R in the month? Click to show or hide the answer
Line of Mars, Girdle of Venus Click to show or hide the answer
15th July: it's said that if it rains on this day, it'll rain for 40 days Click to show or hide the answer
Annual ceremony of marking the new–born cygnets on the Thames Click to show or hide the answer
Various annual festivals held in Shetland (Scotland) – most famously in Lerwick – to mark the end of the yule (Christmas) season, involving a torchlit procession through the town and culminating in the burning of a replica Viking longship Click to show or hide the answer
Known in Celtic tradition, and generally throughout Europe, as the king of the birds; hunted on St. Stephen's Day (Boxing Day) to commemorate his martyrdom Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017–18