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Days of the Week

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Days of the Week

English Latin French Spanish Italian Named after
Monday Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Tuesday Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Wednesday Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Thursday Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Friday Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Saturday Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Sunday Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

The original Latin names honoured the heavenly bodies and not the deities. The statement about Sunday being named after "the Lord's day" obviously applies only to French, Spanish and Italian; in Latin (and English) it's named after the Sun.

English Named after German Named after / Meaning
Monday Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Tuesday Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Wednesday Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Thursday Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Friday Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Saturday Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Sunday Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

The Germanic peoples substituted the names of their own gods for Mars, Mercury, Jupiter and Venus; the degree of correspondence varies.

Tiw was the Norse god of war (or combat); Woden was the Old English name for Odin, chief of the Aesir deities (i.e. most of them); Thor was the god of thunder; Frigg (sometimes Frige or Freyja – they may or may not have a common origin) was the wife of Odin; the planet Venus was known as "Frigg's star".

Alternative name for Saturday, used in northern Germany (and in the former GDR) - meaning "Sunday eve" Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017