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London

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Famous Postcodes
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London

As the capital city of the United Kingdom, London is a favourite topic for quizzes. Those of us who live outside the capital probably need to know more about London than we do about our own home towns!

Famous Postcodes

SW1A 1AA Click to show or hide the answer
SW1A 2AA Click to show or hide the answer
E20 2ST Click to show or hide the answer
EC4M 8AE Click to show or hide the answer
W1A 1AA Click to show or hide the answer

Other

Number of houses in Downing Street Click to show or hide the answer
Location in St. John's Wood, given UK Heritage Listed status in 2010 Click to show or hide the answer
London landmark: built in two stages in the 1930s and 1950s, largely unused since 1983; featured on the cover of Pink Floyd's 1977 album Animals, with a giant inflatable pig floating above it Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional home of London's fish market (relocated to the Isle of Dogs in 1982) Click to show or hide the answer
Street on the south side of St. James's Park, Westminster, named because the Royal Menagerie and Aviary was sited there in the reign of King James I Click to show or hide the answer
Famous magistrates' court, opened in 1735: dealt with Oscar Wilde, Lord Haw Haw, Dr. Crippen, and the Kray Twins; closed in 2006 Click to show or hide the answer
Great Russell Street, Bloomsbury (WC1B 3DG) is the address of the Click to show or hide the answer
London's largest borough, by area Click to show or hide the answer
Former private house on Piccadilly, near Piccadilly Circus: main building now houses the Royal Academy of the Arts, other buildings house the London Geographical Society, Linnean Society, Royal Astronomical Society, Royal Society of Chemistry, London Society of Antiquaries Click to show or hide the answer
Named after the place of origin of tomatoes unloaded there Click to show or hide the answer
Mileages to London, on road signs around the UK, are measured to Click to show or hide the answer
Popular nickname for the Leadenhall Building (122 Leadenhall Street – completed 2014) Click to show or hide the answer
Brought to London in 1877, at his own expense, by the surgeon and dermatologist Sir Erasmus Wilson (full name William James Erasmus Wilson); a razor, cigars and a portrait of Queen Victoria were buried under it Click to show or hide the answer
Indicated (since February 2003) by a road sign showing a white letter C on a red circle Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional home of London's fruit market (moved to Nine Elms in 1974) Click to show or hide the answer
Built in Hyde Park for the Great Exhibition, 1851, then moved to Sydenham Hill; destroyed by fire 1936 Click to show or hide the answer
Tin Pan Alley: official name Click to show or hide the answer
London Underground line with the most stations Click to show or hide the answer
Name used since at least 1765 for the area of South London formerly known as Newington – after a public house on a major road intersection, its sign depicting the arms of the Worshipful Company of Cutlers. Folk etymology asserts that the name is a corruption of 'Infanta de Castile' – which could refer to any one of a number of Spanish princesses that have been associated with British monarchs over the years (including Eleanor of Castile, consort of Edward I) Click to show or hide the answer
Official name of the Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster, which houses Big Ben, since 2012 (changed in honour of the Diamond Jubilee) Click to show or hide the answer
Official name of the original Wembley Stadium Click to show or hide the answer
No. 10 Downing Street is the home (according to the brass plate on its front door) of the Click to show or hide the answer
Formerly occupied the site of the Congregational Memorial Hall, on Farringdon Street (where the Labour Party was founded in 1900) Click to show or hide the answer
Popular nickname of 30 St. Mary Axe (formerly the Swiss Re building; built on the site of the Baltic Exchange building, bombed by the IRA in 1992) Click to show or hide the answer
The Monument commemorates the Click to show or hide the answer
J. M. Barrie donated royalties from Peter Pan in 1925 to Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's largest bell – in St. Paul's Cathedral Click to show or hide the answer
Gives its name to a tube station on Dover Street, which was known by that name until 1933 (between Hyde Park Corner and Piccadilly Circus, on the Piccadilly Line) Click to show or hide the answer
Borough that the Millennium Dome is in Click to show or hide the answer
Location of the US Embassy Click to show or hide the answer
Private members' club at 45 Dean Street, Soho, established in the late 1980s for people who work in publishing, entertainment, arts and the media Click to show or hide the answer
Venue of the Lord Mayor's Banquet Click to show or hide the answer
87–135 Brompton Road, SW1, is the registered address of – London store bombed by the IRA during the Christmas shopping rush in 1983 Click to show or hide the answer
Centre of London's jewellery trade, since the Middle Ages Click to show or hide the answer
Rotten Row, Speakers Corner, Lake Serpentine Click to show or hide the answer
Housed since 1936 in the former Bethlem (Bedlam) psychiatric hospital on Lambeth Road, SE1 Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's first cinema opened (5 August 1901) Click to show or hide the answer
Underground line opened in 1977, coloured grey on maps; extended in 1999 to serve the Millennium Dome Click to show or hide the answer
Statue of Peter Pan Click to show or hide the answer
Street that links the Royal Albert Hall and Kensington Gardens (including the Albert Memorial); gave its name to a formerly patented brand of theatrical blood – now used generically Click to show or hide the answer
Chinese Pagoda (1762, ten storeys), Queen Charlotte's Cottage (1771), Nash Conservatory (originally designed for Buckingham Palace, moved here in 1836), Palm House (1844–8), Waterlily House (1852), Temperate House (1859), Japanese Gateway (1911), Minka House (built in Japan in 1900, reassembled here in 2001), Dutch House (1781), Princess of Wales Conservatory (1987), Alpine House (2006): found in Click to show or hide the answer
Test that London taxi drivers have to pass before being granted a licence Click to show or hide the answer
Private wing in St. Mary's Hospital, Paddington, where Princes William, Harry and George were all born Click to show or hide the answer
London institution that's on Lime Street Click to show or hide the answer
In 2001, Dawn Bottomley and Simon Stapleton became the first couple to marry at Click to show or hide the answer
Site of St. Paul's Cathedral (from 604 AD) Click to show or hide the answer
Runs from Admiralty Arch to Buckingham Palace Click to show or hide the answer
Official residence of the Lord Mayor of London Click to show or hide the answer
Now stands at the junction of Oxford Street and Park Lane; moved from Hyde Park (outside Buckingham Palace) Click to show or hide the answer
London hospital, founded 1851 as the Free Cancer Hospital, the world's first cancer hospital; granted a royal charter by George V 1910, and renamed after its founder 1954 Click to show or hide the answer
Notorious prison in Southwark (1373–1842): known as the debtors' prison Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
London tavern, said to have been a haunt of Ben Johnson and Shakespeare – Keats wrote a poem in praise of it Click to show or hide the answer
Petticoat Lane: official name Click to show or hide the answer
Designed by Christopher Wren and Robert Hooke to act as a telescope, and to be used in experiments with a pendulum to investigate the force of gravity (although it proved to be unsuitable for either, due to traffic disturbance) Click to show or hide the answer
City Road, Islington: Europe's oldest and largest eye hospital Click to show or hide the answer
London's principal postal sorting office Click to show or hide the answer
Founded in 1856; moved to its permanent home in St. Martin's Place (just off Trafalgar Square) in 1896 Click to show or hide the answer
Stands on the site formerly occupied by Newgate Prison Click to show or hide the answer
Millennium Dome renamed 2005 Click to show or hide the answer
First street in Britain to be lit by gas; named after a game similar to croquet (various other spellings, including pell–mell) Click to show or hide the answer
Statues of Abraham Lincoln, Winston Churchill, Jan Smuts Click to show or hide the answer
Runs from Hyde Park Corner to Marble Arch Click to show or hide the answer
The London Stock Exchange relocated in 2004 from Threadneedle Street to Click to show or hide the answer
Henry Croft (1861–1930 – a roadsweeper, who was born and died in St. Pancras Workhouse) was the first Click to show or hide the answer
The Shaftesbury Memorial (Eros, and its plinth) Click to show or hide the answer
The stretch of the River Thames immediately below London Bridge (as far as Cuckold's Point, on the Rotherhithe peninsula – opposite Canary Wharf) Click to show or hide the answer
Central government records, Domesday Book: kept at Click to show or hide the answer
Great Fire of London (1666) started in Click to show or hide the answer
Type of bird that's prevented from flying away from the Tower of London by having their wings clipped Click to show or hide the answer
London Zoo Click to show or hide the answer
Hamley's, the world–famous toy shop, is on Click to show or hide the answer
The only London borough with land on both sides of the Thames; shares its name with a market town in North Yorkshire Click to show or hide the answer
Renamed Ruston Close in 1954; demolished in the 1970s Click to show or hide the answer
Fleet Street: named after Click to show or hide the answer
Home of the Chelsea Pensioners; Chelsea Flower Show is held in its grounds Click to show or hide the answer
Isle of Dogs: gets its name from the Click to show or hide the answer
Neighbourhood of Fleet and King's Bench prisons, where trusted prisoners lived under specified conditions Click to show or hide the answer
47 Frith Street Click to show or hide the answer
Famous hotel on the Strand, on the site of the former palace of the same name, opened 1889 by Richard D'Oyly Carte; its forecourt (Savoy Court) is the only street in Britain where traffic must keep to the right Click to show or hide the answer
Originally in Whitehall, near Charing Cross; 1890–1967, near Westminster Bridge; since 1967 Broadway, Westminster Click to show or hide the answer
Landmark structure and the abiding symbol of the Festival of Britain (1951): a long steel latticework frame, pointed at both ends and supported vertically on cables slung between three steel beams, but with no apparent means of support (like the British economy of the time, according to a popular joke) Click to show or hide the answer
Area of the City of London: site of the new Haberdashers' Hall (opened 2002), also where William Wallace and Wat Tyler were executed; but best known for its centuries–old meat market Click to show or hide the answer
Conservative Party headquarters Click to show or hide the answer
Building on the Strand, housed the General Register Office for almost 150 years from 1837; now used as a centre for the visual arts Click to show or hide the answer
London borough with two cathedrals – one Catholic, one Anglican Click to show or hide the answer
London's oldest Royal Park (laid out by James I on land bought by Henry VIII): has The Mall on its north side, Birdcage Walk on the south Click to show or hide the answer
Famous church at the north–east corner of Trafalgar Square Click to show or hide the answer
A museum dedicated to Florence Nightingale opened in 1989 (and re–opened after major refurbishment in 2010, in time for the centenary of her death) in Click to show or hide the answer
10, Paternoster Square: headquarters, since 2004, of (the) Click to show or hide the answer
Postal district that includes Wimbledon Click to show or hide the answer
Somerset House, Royal Courts of Justice, Savoy Hotel and Theatre, Adelphi Theatre; runs from Charing Cross to Fleet Street Click to show or hide the answer
Picture gallery on Millbank Click to show or hide the answer
London horse market, 18th Century Click to show or hide the answer
Trade whose home is in Mincing Lane Click to show or hide the answer
Bank of England; headquarters of the Merchant Taylors' Company Click to show or hide the answer
Parliament Street, SW1, is the address of Click to show or hide the answer
London borough created 1974 and incorporating the former boroughs of Stepney, Bethnal Green, and Poplar Click to show or hide the answer
From 1810 to 1968, the Royal Mint was housed in a purpose–built building on Click to show or hide the answer
Location of the Royal Mint, until 1810; the English crown jewels have been kept since 1303 in the Click to show or hide the answer
The National Gallery stands at the northern end of Click to show or hide the answer
The Fourth Plinth Project is a scheme to put noteworthy modern sculptures on prominent public display in
The gate in the Tower of London that gives access to and from the River Thames – which was used to convey many prisoners into the Tower Click to show or hide the answer
The UK's second largest sports stadium, after Wembley (capacity 82,000) Click to show or hide the answer
Underground line that terminates at Brixton Click to show or hide the answer
Popular nickname for 20 Fenchurch Street: completed in 2015, it won Building Design magazine's Carbuncle Cup award for Britain's ugliest new building Click to show or hide the answer
Made headlines in 2013 (while still under construction) when it was blamed for reflecting light that melted parts of a Jaguar car parked on a nearby street
Soho street associated with the film industry; also the Marquee Club Click to show or hide the answer
Tomb of the Unknown Warrior; Poets' Corner; Shrine of St. Edward the Confessor Click to show or hide the answer
the headquarters of the British Army are on Click to show or hide the answer
SW19: postcode of (famous sporting venue) Click to show or hide the answer
Famous street in the City of Westminster: home of the Royal Society of Medicine and the British Dental Association; home of the Barrett family when Elizabeth Barrett eloped with Robert Browning (1846); Paul McCartney lived there with Jane Asher, 1964–6 Click to show or hide the answer

The London 'blue plaque' scheme has been successively administered by:

1867–1901 Click to show or hide the answer
1901–65 Click to show or hide the answer
1965–86 Click to show or hide the answer
1986 to date Click to show or hide the answer

The RSA's plaques were a variety of colours – often terracotta; it was the London County Council that standardised on blue, after the Second World War. The very first plaque was erected on a house in Holles Street, near Cavendish Square (just off Oxford Street, near the junction with Regent Street), in honour of Lord Byron; unfortunately that house was demolished in 1889. A John Lewis department store now stands on the site, and bears a Westminster City Council plaque to Lord Byron.

© Haydn Thompson 2017