Monkey

Quiz Monkey
What do you want to know?

You are here:

General
Publishing

If you like my website, and/or if you've found it useful, please consider making a small donation to my Just Giving page, which I've set up just for this purpose. To begin with I'm collecting for a charity whose work I have benefitted from myself (and continue to do so): the British Heart Foundation. It would be great to raise £100 in the first month.

If you have already donated ... Thank You!

Publishing

First book ("first major book" – Wikipedia) printed in Europe (1450s) Click to show or hide the answer
First book printed in English (by William Caxton in Bruges, 1475) Click to show or hide the answer
First book printed in Britain (by Caxton at Westminster, 1476) Click to show or hide the answer

Manchester Guardian became The Guardian Click to show or hide the answer
The Sun first published Click to show or hide the answer
Daily Sketch merged into the Daily Mail Click to show or hide the answer
Daily Star first published Click to show or hide the answer
Today first published Click to show or hide the answer
The Independent first published Click to show or hide the answer
Today's last edition Click to show or hide the answer
News of the World's last edition Click to show or hide the answer
Sun on Sunday first published Click to show or hide the answer
The Independent's last print edition Click to show or hide the answer

Time on the clock on the masthead of The Times (said to be the time when the last edition went to press, in its early days) Click to show or hide the answer
Bought the Daily Express in 1916; launched the Sunday Express in 1918; acquired the London Evening Standard in 1923 Click to show or hide the answer
The BBC's in–house magazine: launched in 1936, went digital only in 2011; named after one of the two figures (both from Shakespeare's The Tempest) in the controversial sculpture by Eric Gill that stands over the entrance to Broadcasting House Click to show or hide the answer
Official newspaper of the Italian Socialist Party, 1896–1993; edited by Benito Mussolini (immediately before World War I) Click to show or hide the answer
German publisher of travel guide books, founded in 1827 Click to show or hide the answer
BBC magazine with World Service listings Click to show or hide the answer
"Midi" size adopted by The Guardian in 2005 and The Observer in 2006 Click to show or hide the answer
Washington Post journalists who exposed Watergate and wrote All the President's Men Click to show or hide the answer
Founded in 1991 by John Bird and Gordon Roddick – inspired by Street News, a newspaper sold by homeless people in New York Click to show or hide the answer
Publisher of the Harry Potter books Click to show or hide the answer
British company, claims to be the world's largest publisher of sheet music; also manufactured instruments, up to 2003 Click to show or hide the answer
Co–founder of Spare Rib magazine and Virago Press, editor of the Independent on Sunday, appointed editor of the Independent in 1998 Click to show or hide the answer
The first railway timetable – published regularly from 1839; enjoyed a resurgence of popuarity as a consequence of frequent references in the BBC television series Great British Railway Journeys (from 2010); became a surprise best–seller in 2011, when the 1863 edition, as used by Michael Portillo in the series, was republished as a facsimile Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Founder of Virago Press Click to show or hide the answer
Weekly Socialist newspaper, founded in Manchester in 1891 by Robert Blatchford and Alexander M. Thompson Click to show or hide the answer
New York–based magazine empire, publisher of Vogue, Vanity Fair and GQ (among many others) – named after its 1909 founder Click to show or hide the answer
Magazine launched by Helen Gurley Brown Click to show or hide the answer
First came to notice as writers of the Bon Viveur column in the Daily Telegraph, 1950–5 Click to show or hide the answer
Standard reference work published by the Church of England since 1858, listing its clergy Click to show or hide the answer
The first English daily newspaper (1702–35) Click to show or hide the answer
Founded in 1900 by Sir Arthur Pearson; masthead has featured a Crusader logo (satirised by Private Eye) since 1933; switched to tabloid format in 1977 (six years after the Mail) Click to show or hide the answer
First published in 1912; re–launched in 1964 as The Sun Click to show or hide the answer
Founded in 1896 by Alfred Harmsworth (later Lord Northcliffe); gained popularity by sponsoring early flights; switched to tabloid format on 3 May 1971, its 75th anniversary Click to show or hide the answer
Founded in 1903 by Alfred Harmsworth (later Lord Northcliffe) as a daily newspaper run by women, for women; relaunched in 1904 as a pictorial newspaper run by men Click to show or hide the answer
First used the word Beatlemania, on 2 November 1963
Scottish sister of the Daily Mirror Click to show or hide the answer
Foundedin Manchester, 1909, by Edward Hulton; merged with the Daily Mail in 1971 Click to show or hide the answer
Owned by Conrad Black 1985–2004, David & Frederick Barclay from 2004; edited by Bill Deedes 1974–86, Max Hastings 1986–95 Click to show or hide the answer
Employed the 'undercover journalists' that got Sam Allardyce sacked from the England job in 2016
Compiler of The Peerage of England, Scotland and Ireland (1802) and The Baronetage of England (1808) Click to show or hide the answer
Editor of the Daily Telegraph, 1974–86: generally assumed to have been the addressee of the spoof "Dear Bill" letters, from Denis Thatcher, in Private Eye Click to show or hide the answer
Regional daily newspaper, published in Norwich since 1870 Click to show or hide the answer
Name shared by local newspapers in Liverpool and Bournemouth (founded in 1879 and 1900 respectvely) Click to show or hide the answer
First published in Edinburgh in three volumes, 1768–71; donated to the University of Chicago in 1943, and published there ever since; logo is a thistle Click to show or hide the answer
Weekly (Thursday) newspaper launched by Robert Maxwell in 1990; ceased publication in 1998 Click to show or hide the answer
Published its first 50 titles in 1905 Click to show or hide the answer
First published in 1868, as a development of a column of the same name in Queen magazine; claimed to be the first newspaper in the world to specialise in classified advertising; went online only in 2009 Click to show or hide the answer
'Men's lifestyle magazine' (or 'lad mag'), 1985–2015 – famous for its annual 100 Sexiest Women in the World feature Click to show or hide the answer
British daily newspaper, traditionally printed on pink paper Click to show or hide the answer
Sheet of paper folded once to make four pages Click to show or hide the answer
British novelist: founder of the English Review and Transatlantic Review Click to show or hide the answer
International Financial Times: published since 1979 in Click to show or hide the answer
The world's largest publisher of English language travel guides – founded in Paris, 1946, by a Hungarian travel writer Click to show or hide the answer
Original editor of A Dictionary of Music and Musicians, first published in 1878 Click to show or hide the answer
Dropped the word Manchester from its title in 1959; edited by Alastair Hetherington 1956–75, Peter Preston 1975–95, Alan Rusbridger 1995–(2010) Click to show or hide the answer
Founder of Penthouse magazine Click to show or hide the answer
Publishing group founded by Michael Heseltine Click to show or hide the answer
UK gossip magazine, launched in 1999; shares its name with a 1995 film that starred Robert De Niro and Al Pacino Click to show or hide the answer
Celebrity news and gossip magazine, successfully sued by Michael Douglas and Catherine Zeta Jones in 2003 for publishing unauthorised photographs of their wedding; also sued by rival magazine OK! which had an exclusive contract Click to show or hide the answer
Succeeded Richard Ingrams as editor of Private Eye, in 1986 Click to show or hide the answer
Weekly magazine founded by Dickens in 1850 Click to show or hide the answer
Compiled in 1861 by Henry Baker and William Monk Click to show or hide the answer
Newspaper launched by The Independent, October 2010: aimed at younger readers and commuters, costing 20p; sold to the Johnston Press in 2016, the day before the Indy announced that it was going online–only Click to show or hide the answer
Books published before 1501 – Latin for "swaddling clothes" or "cradle" Click to show or hide the answer
Editor of Private Eye, 1963–86; founding editor of The Oldie, 1992 Click to show or hide the answer
Underground newspaper or magazine, founded in London in 1966 – used a picture of silent film star Theda Bara in its logo, the editors having mistaking it for Clara Bow ("the It Girl") Click to show or hide the answer
Paparazzi: film in which the term originates (Fellini, 1960) Click to show or hide the answer
The first women's magazine (1693) Click to show or hide the answer
Weekly journal of the medical profession in Britain Click to show or hide the answer
Book club founded in 1936 by Victor Gollancz Click to show or hide the answer
Featured on the cover of the first issue of Rolling Stone magazine (1967) Click to show or hide the answer
American pictorial news magazine was published from 1936 to 1972 Click to show or hide the answer
The first Page 3 girl (in The Sun – 1969) Click to show or hide the answer
Magazine launched by the BBC (under Lord Reith) in 1929, to provide more in–depth coverage of subjects of radio broadcasts than the Radio Times; ceased publication in 1991 Click to show or hide the answer
'Lad–mag', launched in 1994, has the same name as the first Top 20 hit for the Scottish alternative rock band Primal Scream Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's oldest publishing company (founded in 1724; acquired by Pearson in 1968, survives as Pearson Longman, an imprint of Pearson Education) Click to show or hide the answer
USA: largest newspaper circulation Click to show or hide the answer
Supplement entitled You Click to show or hide the answer
Founder of the Pergamon Press; acquired Mirror Group Newspapers; removed over £400m from its pension fund; died in 1991 Click to show or hide the answer
Twin brothers who established the Guinness Book of Records Click to show or hide the answer
Free daily newspaper, published by Associated Newspapers Ltd. (who also publish the Daily Mail); launched in 1999, now distributed in 14 British cities Click to show or hide the answer
Publishing house, founded in 1908, moved in the 1930s to specialise in romantic novels, which have been criticised as low–brow and formulaic – even misogynistic; bought in 1971 by Harlequin Enterprises (of Toronto) – previously its North American distributor Click to show or hide the answer
Playboy's first Playmate of the Month – also appeared on the front cover Click to show or hide the answer
Formerly the Daily Worker Click to show or hide the answer
Definitive reference for methods of timekeeping worldwide Click to show or hide the answer
Left Newscorp, where he'd been Editor of the Sunday Times and a key figure in the launch of Sky TV, in 1994 – claiming that Rupert Murdoch had become jealous of his celebrity Click to show or hide the answer
Sponsors of a set of annual prizes for children's books, 1985–2008 Click to show or hide the answer
Newspaper launched by the Trinity Mirror Group on 29 February 2016, aimed at a middle–aged female readership: folded in the first week of May (66 days later) Click to show or hide the answer
Danny Baker, Julie Birchill, Tony Parsons: all wrote for Click to show or hide the answer
Media group founded by Rupert Murdoch Click to show or hide the answer
Weekly publication, covering politics and culture: founded in 1913 by Sidney and Beatrice Webb, with the support of George Bernard Shaw and other prominent members of the Fabian Society Click to show or hide the answer
Founded in 1925 by Harold Ross; Thurber a regular contributor Click to show or hide the answer
Employed Henry Morton Stanley as a special correspondent in 1867, and instructed him in 1869 to undertake a roving commission in the Middle East, which was to include the relief of Dr. David Livingstone (1871) Click to show or hide the answer
Founded and edited by Horace Greeley (1841); championed the abolition of slavery in the USA Click to show or hide the answer
US newspaper that published the first crossword puzzle in 1913 Click to show or hide the answer
The original UK weekly 'lads' mag': launched in 2004 with the slogan "When You Really Need Something Funny"; ceased publication 2014 Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's, and the world's, oldest Sunday newspaper (founded in 1791 by W. S. Bourne); Clement Freud was once its football correspondent; Mrs. Blair's Diary appeared in Click to show or hide the answer
Fictional couple who answered readers' letters and queries in the Daily Mirror, from 1934 to 1990 Click to show or hide the answer
First published in 1697 as Vox Stellarum ('the voice of the stars') Click to show or hide the answer
Underground magazine, established by Richard Neville and first published in Sydney in 1963; prosecuted for obscenity in Australia 1964 and UK in 1971; in both cases the editors were found guilty and sentenced to harsh jail terms, but acquitted on appeal Click to show or hide the answer
Original sponsors of the 'Cyclopaedia' published by Penguin, whose name it still bears Click to show or hide the answer
Magazine that published Britain's first crossword puzzle in 1922 Click to show or hide the answer
Penguin imprint launched in 1937 for books that were educational rather than entertaining – identified by pale blue covers – discontinued in 1990 Click to show or hide the answer
Publishing house founded in 1935 by Allen Lane Click to show or hide the answer
Published annually, 1732–58, by Benjamin Franklin, under a pseudonym; sold up to 10,000 copies per year – an exceptional number for the American colonies in those times; credited with popularising the motto, "Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise" Click to show or hide the answer
Grew out of a magazine edited at Shrewsbury School by Richard Ingrams, Willie Rushton, Christopher Booker, Paul Foot; edited since 1986 by Ian Hislop – previously (from 1963) by Ingrams; purports to be owned by Lord Gnome Click to show or hide the answer
Regular features include Pseud's Corner, Nooks & Corners (founded by John Betjeman)Rotten Boroughs, Street of Shame, HP Sauce, Medicine Balls; lampooning parodies of prime ministers, starting with Mrs. Wilson's Diary and including The Vicar of St. Albion (Tony Blair)
Refers to the Queen as Brenda
Name and symbol of Penguin Books' children's series Click to show or hide the answer
Founded in 1841 by Henry Mayhew and Ebenezer Landells; first editors were Mayhew and Mark Lemon. "Advice to persons about to marry: Don't" is one of the most famous lines (jokes) from Click to show or hide the answer
Cocoa Press: nickname for newspapers published by Click to show or hide the answer
Founded in 1922 by DeWitt Wallace and his wife Lila; said to be the world's most widely read magazine Click to show or hide the answer
Right and left–hand pages of a book Click to show or hide the answer
Principal proprietor of the Daily Mail from 1922 (died in 1940) Click to show or hide the answer
Editor of the Manchester Guardian from 1872 to 1929, and its owner from 1907 until his death in 1932 Click to show or hide the answer
First man to feature on the cover of Playboy magazine (1964) Click to show or hide the answer
Daily newspaper of the Potteries Click to show or hide the answer
Founder of Today newspaper Click to show or hide the answer
Appeared on the front cover of Playboy magazine in November 2009, wearing only a blue beehive hairdo Click to show or hide the answer
Pop music magazine, 1978–2006 – originally to publish song lyrics Click to show or hide the answer
British feminist magazine, 1972–92 – founded by Rosie Boycott and Marsha Rowe Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Founded 1711 by Joseph Addison Click to show or hide the answer
British newspaper: founded in 1859, online only from 1998; best known for its coverage of horse racing Click to show or hide the answer
Weekly newspaper for the British entertainment industry, but mainly the theatre – founded in 1880 Click to show or hide the answer
First published in Milan in 1868, as the Gazzetta Piemontese Click to show or hide the answer
London livery company that held a monopoly on publishing in Britain, from its foundation in 1402 until the passing of the Copyright Act in 1709; amalgamated with the Newspaper Makers' Company in 1937 Click to show or hide the answer
Monthly magazine, first published in 1891; Sherlock Holmes stories first appeared in Click to show or hide the answer
UK's largest daily newspaper circulation Click to show or hide the answer
The first British newspaper to publish a crossword puzzle (1924) Click to show or hide the answer
Dick Francis was racing correspondent, from 1957 to 1973, for the
First British newspaper to publish a colour supplement Click to show or hide the answer
1997 ghost–written novel, attributed to supermodel Naomi Campbell Click to show or hide the answer
Catholic weekly: published in London, founded in 1840, owned by the laity except between 1868 and 1937 (when it was owned by successive Archbishops of Westminster) Click to show or hide the answer
Principal news agency of the Soviet Union Click to show or hide the answer
Dundee–based publisher of the Beano, Dandy, etc. Click to show or hide the answer
Founded 1785 as The Daily Universal Register; nicknamed The Thunderer; ceased publication for almost a year owing to an industrial dispute, 1978–9 Click to show or hide the answer
Founded in 1902, edited by Bruce Richmond Click to show or hide the answer
Launched in 1986 by Eddy Shah; the first British newspaper to be routinely published in colour; ceased publication in 1995 Click to show or hide the answer
Bookbinder's name for the left hand page of a book Click to show or hide the answer
Founded in 1973 by Carmen Callil, to publish books by women writers – new and reissued Click to show or hide the answer
Humorous magazine first published in 1979 by Newcastle schoolboys Chris and Simon Donald Click to show or hide the answer
US equivalent of the Financial Times: published in New York, has the highest circulation of any US newspaper (New York Times is second) Click to show or hide the answer
Newspaper of the Salvation Army Click to show or hide the answer
Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward exposed Watergate in the Click to show or hide the answer
Religious magazine of the Jehovah's Witnesses Click to show or hide the answer
On 1 August 1861, The Times published the first Click to show or hide the answer
"The national newspaper of Wales" (self–proclaimed); founded in 1869, published in Cardiff Click to show or hide the answer
Monthly publication of The Consumer Association Click to show or hide the answer
Centenary edition of the Financial Times (1993) was Click to show or hide the answer
Michael Winner's restaurant review column in the Sunday Times, published for 20 years until shortly before his death in January 2013 Click to show or hide the answer
Daughter of a former Editor of the Evening Standard. Started work in 1970 at Harpers & Queen (London); joined Harper's Bazaar (New York) in 1976 as Fashion Editor; named Creative Director of American Vogue in 1983; Editor in Chief of British Vogue, 1986–8, and of American Vogue from 1988 Click to show or hide the answer
Weekly sister magazine to FHM, published 2004–15 (outlasted its weekly rival Nuts by about 18 months) Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017