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Geography
Counties

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Emblems
England
Wales (and Scotland)
Northern Ireland
Republic of Ireland

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Counties

This page is about the counties of Great Britain and Ireland.

See also County Towns.

Emblems, flags, coats of arms (England – selected)

Three Saxon knives (similar to scimitars) (cf. Middlesex) Click to show or hide the answer
White horse rampant Click to show or hide the answer
Red rose Click to show or hide the answer
Three Saxon knives (similar to scimitars), with a crown on top (cf. Essex) Click to show or hide the answer
Knot Click to show or hide the answer
Six martlets (mythical birds), arranged in an inverted triangle, with a crown on top Click to show or hide the answer
Bear and ragged staff Click to show or hide the answer
Three black pears Click to show or hide the answer
White rose Click to show or hide the answer

England

Whipsnade Zoo, Woburn Abbey, Biggleswade, Leighton Buzzard Click to show or hide the answer
Broadmoor, Sandhurst; Ascot (and its racecourse) Click to show or hide the answer
Milton Keynes, Bletchley Park Click to show or hide the answer
Medmenham Abbey (venue of Sir Francis Dashwood's notorious Hellfire Club, 1749–60)
Chequers (near Wendover)
Burnham Beeches (ancient forest)
Stilton (village – the eponymous cheese was originally sold there, but never actually made there) Click to show or hide the answer
Anglesey Abbey (on a site probably named after the Angles)
Devil's Dyke is a major earthwork (over 7 miles long, 30ft high in places) in
The Middle Level Navigations, said to be England's fifth longest canal, are used for land drainage in
Beeston Castle, Little Moreton Hall, Quarry Bank Mill (Styal) Click to show or hide the answer
Northwich, Nantwich, Congleton, Warrington, Crewe, Sandbach, Macclesfield
The Bridestones (Neolithic cairn)
Longest coastline; border with only one other (England) Click to show or hide the answer
Mullion Cove, St. Ives Bay, St. Agnes Head; Mousehole, Come–to–good, Indian Queens, Playing Place, St. Mawes Castle
Minack (my–nack) open–air theatre Click for more information
Lost Gardens of Heligan
Kernow is the Celtic name for
St. Piran's flag (a white cross on a black background) is the flag of Click for more information
Formed 1974 by the merger of Cumberland and Westmorland Click to show or hide the answer
St. Bees Head is the westernmost point of
Cartmel Priory (and racecourse)
Melmerby, Langwathby and Glassonby are villages in
Buckfast Abbey, Castle Drogo, Westward Ho! Click to show or hide the answer
The only English county that has two separate mainland coastlines (i.e. excluding islands)
The River Piddle, and the villages of Puddletown, Tolpuddle, Piddlehinton, Piddletrenthide, Affpuddle, Briantspuddle, and Turnerspuddle (all of which it flows through); also the village of Shitterton, and the clifftop valley Scratchy Bottom Click to show or hide the answer
Maiden Castle, Corfe Castle; Portland Bill, Durdle Door, Lulworth Cove, Old Harry Rocks (features of the Jurassic Coast); Cerne Abbas Giant
Blue Vinney cheese comes from
Hugh Fearnley–Whittingstall's River Cottage Click for more information
Toronto, Pity Me, Bishop Auckland, Crook: towns in Click to show or hide the answer
Stansted Airport Click to show or hide the answer
Canvey, Foulness and Mersea are islands off the coast of; The Naze is a headland on the coast of; Maldon – town famous for its sea salt
Forest of Dean, Slimbridge Wildfowl Trust, The Cotswolds (mainly) Click to show or hide the answer
Source of the River Thames (Seven Springs)
Highgrove House
Pennsylvania, Upper & Lower Slaughter (villages)
Southampton, Portsmouth and Basingstoke are the three largest cities or towns in Click to show or hide the answer
Aldershot, Andover, Eastleigh, Fareham, Farnborough, Gosport and Havant are other towns in
Pilot Hill (938 ft / 286 m), in the North Wessex Downs AONB, is the highest point of
New Forest
Haslar Royal Naval Hospital
Letchworth, Welwyn Garden City (Britain's first two Garden Cities – founded 1903 and 1920 respectively, designated New Towns 1948 and 1946); also Hemel Hempstead New Town (designated 1947) Click to show or hide the answer
Became part of Cambridgeshire in 1974 Click to show or hide the answer
Motto: Invicta (unconquered) Click to show or hide the answer
Leeds, Hever, Scotney, Sissinghurst, Upnor and Walmer castles
North Foreland: extreme North–East tip of
Dungeness; Borstal (village and eponymous institution)
Isle of Thanet; Isle of Sheppey
Ham, Sandwich: towns in (although in fact Ham is hardly even a hamlet, 1–2 miles south of Sandwich)
Royal Tunbridge Wells (pop. 56,000), Tonbridge (2007 pop. 30,000) (4 miles apart)
Charnwood Forest, Rutland Water, Donington Park (motor racing circuit), Belvoir Castle Click to show or hide the answer
Twycross Zoo, Bosworth Field
Rutland was part of (1974–97)
Wymondham (village where Stilton cheese was originally made – it can also now be made in Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire); Market Harborough
Parts of Kesteven, Parts of Holland, Parts of Lindsey; Market Rasen (racecourse); Burghley House (home since 1961 of the Burghley Horse Trials, one of the six leading three–day equestrian events in the world); Grimsby, Cleethorpes, Skegness, Mablethorpe Click to show or hide the answer
Cranwell – site of the RAF College, founded 1920
Tattershall Castle – "the finest piece of medieval brick–work in England" (built 1430–50)
King's Lynn; Sandringham House; Cromer, Kings Lynn Click to show or hide the answer
Happisburgh, where the oldest evidence of human occupation ever found in the UK (flint tools over 800,000 years old) were discovered in 2010, is a village in
Althorp, Fotheringhay Castle; Corby, Wellingborough, Daventry, Kettering, Naseby; Silverstone motor racing circuit; self–styled "Rose of the Shires" Click to show or hide the answer
England's most northerly county: Kielder Water, Kielder Forest, Rothbury Forest, Wark Forest; Flodden Field; Coldstream; Once Brewed Youth Hostel, and the Twice Brewed Inn (both in the village of Twice Brewed) Click to show or hide the answer
Ashington, Bedlington, Cramlington, Doddington, Ellington, Kirkwhelpington, Longframlington, Widdrington (villages or towns)
Rampton Secure Hospital Click to show or hide the answer
The five dairies licensed to prduce Stilton cheese are all in either Leicestershire or
Blenheim Palace; Woodstock, Henley–upon–Thames, Bicester; has borders with Northants, Bucks, Berks, Wilts, Glos and Warwicks Click to show or hide the answer
England's smallest county, prior to 1974 when it became part of Leicestershire; now (since 1997) a unitary authority Click to show or hide the answer
Shropshire: traditional abbreviation, and official name from 1974 to 1980 Click to show or hide the answer
England's largest landlocked county Click to show or hide the answer
Stokesay and Ludlow castles
The Wrekin, the Long Mynd
Acton Scott Working Farm Museum
Bridgnorth, Craven Arms, Market Drayton, Much Wenlock, Oswestry
Ironbridge – village near the site of Abraham Darby's coal smelting works at Coalbrookdale, where the world's first cast iron bridge was built from 1777 and opened in 1781 (Abraham Darby's grandson, Abraham Darby III, was involved in the building project although his commission for the building work was withdrawn in 1776)
Cadbury Castle; Sedgemoor; Wookey Hole, Cheddar Gorge; Wells (city) Click to show or hide the answer
Hinkley Point (site of two nuclear power stations, with a third in the pipeline)
Loggerheads Click to show or hide the answer
The largest hoard of Anglo–Saxon treasure ever found (valued at £3.25 million) was found in 2009 in (in the parish of Hammerwich, near Lichfield), and named after
"Constable Country" largely refers to; Orford Castle; Sizewell nuclear power station; Eye Click to show or hide the answer
Runnymede; Charterhouse School; Esher (town) Click to show or hide the answer
Epsom, Goodwood, Lingfield Park and Sandown Park racecourses; Brooklands motor racing circuit
Lancing (England's largest village); Bluebell Line (private railway) Click to show or hide the answer
Beachy Head, Bodiam Castle, Herstmonceux Castle; Ashdown Forest – famous as the setting for the Winnie–the–Pooh stories; Plumpton racecourse Click to show or hide the answer
Rottingdean, Woodingdean, Pangdean, Saltdean (villages)
Arundel Castle, Gatwick Airport Click to show or hide the answer
Edgehill (battle site); Royal Leamington Spa Click to show or hide the answer
Formed in 1974 from parts of Staffordshire, Warwickshire and Worcestershire Click to show or hide the answer
Stonehenge; Avebury (including the world's largest megalithic stone circle); Silbury Hill (Europe's largest prehistoric man–made mound) Click to show or hide the answer
Longleat; Marlborough School
Wilton (famous for carpets)
Moonraker: nickname for a person from
Kidderminster, Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham Click to show or hide the answer
England's largest county, post–1974 Click to show or hide the answer
Castle Howard; ruins of Bolton Abbey, Fountains Abbey, Rievaulx Abbey
Boggle Hole Youth Hostel
Conisbrough Castle Click to show or hide the answer
The so–called Rhubarb Triangle – a 9–square–mile area (between Wakefield, Morley and Rothwell), famous for producing early forced rhubarb Click to show or hide the answer

Greater London

I was once asked which borough the northernmost extremity of Greater London was in. It wasn't hard, as it was in a themed round and the question setter had clearly needed a question to which the answer was ... the answer to that question. But once I'd established that, I naturally had to know the other three cardinal extremities of Greater London.

The northernmost point of Greater London is in (borough) Click to show or hide the answer
The southernmost point of Greater London is in (borough) Click to show or hide the answer
The easternmost point of Greater London is in (borough) Click to show or hide the answer
The westernmost point of Greater London is in (borough) Click to show or hide the answer

Bromley comes very close to having the southernmost point.

Greater London ceased to be an administrative county in 1986, but it is still a ceremonial county. In other words, it has a Lord Lieutenant (who represents the Queen there) and (according to Wikipedia) this means it's informally known as a "geographic county".

Wales (and Scotland)

The only reason Scotland doesn't get a section to itself is that I've only got one question about Scottish counties!

Welsh County Borough, created 1996: includes the towns of Abertillery, Ebbw Vale, and Tredegar Click to show or hide the answer
Formed in 1974 from the traditional county of Flintshire, most of Denbighshire, and part of Merionethshire; abolished in 1996 Click to show or hide the answer
Welsh county, created in 1974: included the old counties of Cardiganshire, Carmarthenshire and Pembrokeshire, which were reinstated in 1996 Click to show or hide the answer
Formed in 1974 from the traditional counties of Anglesey and Caernarfonshire, most of Merionethshire, and parts of Denbighshire Click to show or hide the answer
Scottish council area, and former county: has borders with Aberdeenshire and Highland (and no other); name is also a boy's name, which is usually spelt differently (especially outside Scotland) Click to show or hide the answer
Skomer, Skokholm (bird sanctuaries with well–established puffin colonies) and Caldey are islands off the coast of Click to show or hide the answer
Gleneagles golf course (Scottish county) Click to show or hide the answer
Formed in 1974 from the traditional counties of Brecknock, Montgomeryshire and Radnorshire; the only Welsh county with no coastline Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Welsh County Borough, created in 1996: includes the towns of Aberdare, Mountain Ash and Pontypridd Click to show or hide the answer
Welsh County Borough, created in 1996: includes the towns of Abersychan, Blaenavon, Cwmbran and Pontypool Click to show or hide the answer

Northern Ireland

Ballymena, Ballymoney; Giant's Causeway Click to show or hide the answer
Mountains of Mourne Click to show or hide the answer
Doesn't have a shore on Lough Neagh Click to show or hide the answer
Largest in Northern Ireland (just over 23% of total) Click to show or hide the answer

Republic of Ireland

The three counties of Ulster that stayed in the Republic after partition Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer
Republic of Ireland's largest and most southerly county; known as the Rebel County because of Cork town's support for Perkin Warbeck, 1491 Click to show or hide the answer
Blarney Castle (including the Blarney Stone) Click to show or hide the answer
Malin Head (the northernmost point of Ireland) Click to show or hide the answer
Connemara Click to show or hide the answer
Includes the most westerly (mainland) point of the British Isles Click to show or hide the answer
Tralee is the administrative capital of
MacGillycuddy's Reeks, including Ireland's highest mountain Carrantuohill
The Blasket and Skellig islands (Skellig Michael, Little Skellig) and Valentia Island are off the coast of
Officially known as Queen's County, prior to 1922 (cf. King's County) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Smallest county in the Republic of Ireland Click to show or hide the answer
Officially known as King's County, prior to 1922 (cf. Queen's County) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Irish county with Ridings Click to show or hide the answer
On the east coast of Ireland – south of Dublin and north of Wexford; its mountains (known by its name) are Ireland's largest continuous upland area; the National Park (named after the mountains) includes Glendalough Click to show or hide the answer

Irish province of which Dublin is the capital Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017