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Geography
Features

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Geographical Features

This page is about miscellaneous geographical features that aren't covered anywhere else.

See also Coastal Features.

Cave in Cantabria, Spain (near Santander), famous for its Palaeolithic paintings (discovered 1879) Click to show or hide the answer
Little America, Bay of Whales, South Orkney, South Shetland, Queen Maud Land, Wilkes Land, (Marie) Byrd Land Click to show or hide the answer
Desert (in Chile) that includes the world's driest place Click to show or hide the answer
The world's largest natural monolith (a description avoided by geologists): native name Uluru Click to show or hide the answer
Grassy upland of Northern Territory and Queensland, Australia – covering about 50,000 square miles – famous for cattle grazing Click to show or hide the answer
Famous cave near Castleton, Derbyshire, named after the distinctive form of fluorspar (fluorite) found there Click to show or hide the answer
Area of the Great Salt Lake, famous as a venue for motor speed trials – named after a 19th century explorer Click to show or hide the answer
Gorse–covered sandy heathland of Norfolk and Suffolk – south–west of the Fens and south–east of the Broads – gives its name to the local authority that covers the Norfolk part Click to show or hide the answer
Extensive plateau in Co. Clare, Ireland, to the south of Galway Bay; one of Europe's largest karst landscapes; part of it is now a national park Click to show or hide the answer
Vast plain of salt lagoons (locally étangs) surrounded by salt marshes, in the Rhone delta – famous for its white horses, bulls and flamingos Click to show or hide the answer
Series of ancient mine workings (chalk and flint) in South East London – last worked c. 1830 – used as an air raid shelter in World War II Click to show or hide the answer
Includes the lowest land point of the western hemisphere (California) Click to show or hide the answer
English name for the crack in the rock face between the peaks of Y Garn and Glyder Fawr, Snowdonia – known in Welsh as Twll Du ('black hole') Click to show or hide the answer
Arguably the most famous rock face in the world: on the north side of the Yosemite Valley, California, near the valley entrance Click to show or hide the answer
Upper Inn valley, Switzerland; dry, mild climate, famous for resorts Click to show or hide the answer
Sub–sea–level area around The Wash Click to show or hide the answer
Famous feature of the Hebridean island of Staffa, its name used as an alternative title for Meldelssohn's Hebrides Overture Click to show or hide the answer
The longest free pitch in any UK cave, before Titan (Yorkshire Dales) Click to show or hide the answer
Northern Ireland's most popular tourist attraction: on the coast of Co. Antrim, consists of about 40,000 interlocking basalt columns – built, according to legend, by the Irish warrior Finn McCool to provide a path across the sea to Scotland (similar formations appear at Fingal's Cave on the Scottish island of Staffa). Declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site – Northern Ireland's first – in 1986 Click to show or hide the answer
The world's most northerly desert, and the largest in Asia; covers parts of China and Mongolia Click to show or hide the answer
Runs from Fort William to Inverness, separating the North West Highlands from the Grampians; Loch Ness lies in it Click to show or hide the answer
Greatest fault in the earth's crust (East Africa) Click to show or hide the answer
The two parts of Niagara Falls: American Falls and Click to show or hide the answer
Gorge of the Danube, forming part of the border between Serbia and Romania Click to show or hide the answer
Desert that covers up to 70% (depending on the season) of Botswana, and also parts of Namibia and South Africa Click to show or hide the answer
Connects Kabul (Afghanistan) with Peshawar (Pakistan) Click to show or hide the answer
Chasm (100m long, 18m deep) in a hillside in the Peak District, near Buxton – caused by a landslip, it's said to have been used as a meeting place by various groups including the Lollards and the Luddites (as well as ancient pagans) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Limestone rock formation (cliff) in North Yorkshire, a famous beauty spot in the Yorkshire Dales National Park: on 6 December 2015, water fell from it for a few hours, the 80–foot drop making it temporarily England's highest (above–ground) waterfall Click to show or hide the answer
Peninsula bordered to the west by the Atlantic Ocean and to the north–east by the Gironde river; site of most of the great chateaux of the Bordeaux region Click to show or hide the answer
Wind up the Rhone valley Click to show or hide the answer
Covers parts of California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona; Las Vegas is its the largest city; the Joshua Tree is an 'indicator species' Click to show or hide the answer
Name given to the Caribbean coastline of most of Nicaragua and part of Honduras – after a local group of native people Click to show or hide the answer
Considered to be the world's oldest desert – on the west coast of Africa; name means 'vast, empty place' in the local language; one of the countries that it covers part of is named after it Click to show or hide the answer
Desert that covers more than half of Israel Click to show or hide the answer
Massive extinct volcano in Tanzania, famed for its wildlife Click to show or hide the answer
Maid of the Mist is the name given to a series of boats, owned by a company of the same name, used to allow tourists a view of Click to show or hide the answer
Region of the eastern Sahara, in Sudan: named after its native inhabitants Click to show or hide the answer
Arid region of South and Western Australia, bordering the Great Australian Bight: name means 'no trees' Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's deepest cave (Upper Swansea Valley, South Wales) Click to show or hide the answer
Famous geyser in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming; not the tallest or largest geyser in the park, but arguably the most predictable and the first to be given a name; erupts about once every 90 minutes (the intervals range from 45 minutes to 125 minutes); average height 145 feet, highest recorded 185 feet Click to show or hide the answer
Steep–sided ravine in the Tanzanian part of the Great Rift Valley, where the German geologist Hans Reck found early human remains in 1913, and the British husband and wife team of Louis and Mary Leakey later found conclusive evidence that man originated in Africa Click to show or hide the answer
Fertile grasslands between the Andes and the Atlantic (in South America) Click to show or hide the answer
Utah: the world's largest natural bridge (span 275ft, 84m) Click to show or hide the answer
In Australia: Mammy Johnsons, Paddy's and the O'shannassy are all Click to show or hide the answer
Sparsely populated wetland area (approx. 100 sq. miles) of Kent and East Sussex Click to show or hide the answer
Extensive desert at the southern end of the Arabian peninsula Click to show or hide the answer
The longest gorge in Europe – Crete Click to show or hide the answer
Geological fault passing through San Francisco Click to show or hide the answer
Scotland's largest cave (Durness, Sutherland – in the far northwest) Click to show or hide the answer
Coastal and wetland areas of Somerset, between the Quantock and Mendip hills Click to show or hide the answer
Probably the only desert on mainland Europe (Andalucia, Spain – where Sergio Leone filmed his so–called Spaghetti Westerns) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Represented on the official flag of Cape Town Click to show or hide the answer
Popular name for cloud over Table Mountain (Cape Town, South Africa) Click to show or hide the answer
The world's largest eco–system, characterised by coniferous forests and covering most of Alaska, Canada, Sweden, Finland, Norway and Russia Click to show or hide the answer
North–eastern extremity of Kent – separated from the mainland, until; about 2,000 years ago, by the Wantsum Channel: Isle of Click to show or hide the answer
Desert on the India / Pakistan border Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's biggest cave chamber, discovered and explored 1999–2006 (Peak District) – the longest free pitch of any UK cave Click to show or hide the answer
Valley between Marlborough Downs and Salisbury Plain (Wiltshire) Click to show or hide the answer
Known locally as Mosei Oyatunda ('the smoke that thunders') Click to show or hide the answer
Prominent limestone ridge running for 15 miles SW to NE through Shropshire (from Craven Arms to Much Wenlock) Click to show or hide the answer
 Rocky ridge in South Africa, overlooking Johannesburg: contains the world's richest gold deposits, and gives its name to one of Johannesburg's two universities Click to show or hide the answer
Cave system in the Mendip hills, near Wells (Somerset) – famous for the "Witch" (a stalagmite in vaguely human form) Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017