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Geography
Towns and Cities
United Kingdom

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Towns and Cities: United Kingdom

2012: Jubilee cities Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

2002: Jubilee cities Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

2000: Millennium cities Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

The UK's first city, alphabetically Click to show or hide the answer
National Library of Wales Click to show or hide the answer
Suffolk town: first place in Britain to have a woman mayor (Elizabeth Garrett Anderson) Click to show or hide the answer
Venue of an annual festival of classical music, founded 1948 by Eric Crozier, Benjamin Britten and Peter Pears
Cumbrian town on the River Eden, famous for its annual horse fair (June) – one of the largest annual gatherings for gypsies and travellers in the UK Click to show or hide the answer
Deeside town famous for smoked haddock ('smokies') Click to show or hide the answer
Robert the Bruce declared independence (1320) at
Northern Ireland town: historically considered a city, by virtue of its being the seat of the Primate of All Ireland; lost its city corporation by Act of Parliament in 1840; city status officially granted in 1994 in belated celebration of the 40th anniversary of the Queen's accession Click to show or hide the answer
Seat of both Primates of All Ireland (Roman Catholic and Anglican); has two cathedrals, both dedicated to St. Patrick
Wiltshire village that stands partly within what's variously described as "the world's largest Mesolithic stone circle" and "one of Europe's largest stone circles" Click to show or hide the answer
Devon town, gave its name to a high–quality type of carpet Click to show or hide the answer
Derbyshire town, famous as the home of a pudding or tart where the pastry is covered with a thin layer of jam and filled with frangipane (an almond–based filling) Click to show or hide the answer
Name shared by a small Devon town, famous for its annual Pony Fair, and the Oxfordshire town that was used for filming outdoor scenes in the TV series Downton Abbey Click to show or hide the answer
Oxfordshire town, gives its name to a currant–filled pastry cake Click to show or hide the answer
Bowes Museum (said to house the best collection of European fine and decorative arts in the North of England; includes paintings by El Greco, Canaletto and Goya) – market town in County Durham Click to show or hide the answer
Also known as Bideford Bay Click to show or hide the answer
Richard 'Beau' Nash was the 18th Century Master of Ceremonies for Click to show or hide the answer
Royal Crescent (with 30 houses and 114 Ionic columns)
Victoria Art Gallery, Burrows Toy Museum
Sally Lunn's House is reputedly the oldest building in
Town on Anglesey, founded by Edward I in order to build a castle; he evicted local residents (of Llanfaes) to Newborough, and only allowed English people to live there; name comes from the French for "beautiful marshes" Click to show or hide the answer
Anglesey's first county town
Snowdonia village, said to be the site of the grave of Llewellyn's wolfhound (although there is no evidence) Click to show or hide the answer
Odyssey Arena (opened 2000) Click to show or hide the answer
Village in Co. Fermanagh, renowned for its lustre finish china Click to show or hide the answer
England's most northerly town Click to show or hide the answer
The river Trent rises near Click to show or hide the answer
New Street, Moor Street and Snow Hill railway stations Click to show or hide the answer
Cathedrals of St. Philip (Anglican) and St. Chad (Roman Catholic), as well as the Greek Orthodox Cathedral of ... the Mother of God and St. Andrew
Winson Green prison
The Balti Triangle (Ladypool Road, Stoney Lane, Stratford Road) – popularly believed to be the birthplace of the Balti curry
Hollywood is a suburb of
Seat of the Bishop of Durham Click to show or hide the answer
The only British resort with three piers – North (the oldest and longest of the three), Central and South Click to show or hide the answer
Home of the TVR car company
Encircled by the Snowdonia National Park, but not included in it Click to show or hide the answer
Town in the Welsh valleys that is a UNESCO World Heritage Site (first of the UK's 28, in alphabetical order!) and home to The Big Pit: (Welsh) National Coal Museum Click to show or hide the answer
The Premium Bonds Organisation (with ERNIE 3, the third–generation prize–winner–selecting computer) moved in approximately 1996 (from Lytham St. Annes) to Click to show or hide the answer
Perthshire town, famous for its soft fruits (especially raspberries) Click to show or hide the answer
Ye Olde Man & Scythe (one of England's oldest public houses) Click to show or hide the answer
Cornish seaside village, devastated by a flash flood in August 2004 Click to show or hide the answer
Dorset's largest town Click to show or hide the answer
The National Media Museum (formerly the National Museum of Photography, Film and Television) – Britain's most popular museum outside London Click to show or hide the answer
Headquarters of the Meteorological Office Click to show or hide the answer
Wilde Theatre
Divided by the River Severn into High Town and Lower Town, connected by a cliff railway Click to show or hide the answer
Norman keep that has leaned at 17° for 300 years
Northern terminus of the Severn Valley Railway
Bevendean, Roedean (famous for its girls' school), Rottingdean (famous for its windmill) and Saltdean are former villages, now in the city of Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's first nude bathing beach
Volks Electric Railway
The Lanes: alleys full of antique shops, in
Britain's first casino opened in 1962, at the Metropole Hotel in
Cabot Tower (built in the 1890s to commemorate the 400th anniversary of John Cabot's voyage to what later became Canada) Click to show or hide the answer
Temple Meads Railway Station; Colston Hall (concert venue); The Arnolfini (art gallery, founded in 1961) Click for more information
The New Room (a.k.a. John Wesley's Chapel) – the oldest Methodist chapel in the world, built by John Wesley in 1739
Chew Valley Lake provides drinking water for
Bedminster, Downend, Fishponds, Mangotsfield, Montpelier, St. Jude's and St. Paul's are areas of
Devon fishing port and holiday resort: replica of Drake's Golden Hind (since 1963) Click to show or hide the answer
Bleak House, where Dickens wrote much of David Copperfield Click to show or hide the answer
The Royal Welsh show is held each year near Click to show or hide the answer
Home of Bass and Marston's breweries, and Marmite (since its foundation in 1902) Click to show or hide the answer
The largest castle in Wales (also gave its name to a cheese!) Click to show or hide the answer
Town on the River Usk, just outside Newport (formerly in Monmouthshire): site of the notable Roman legionary fortress Isca Augusta (headquarters of Augustus's Second Legion, from about 75 to 300 AD), and an Iron Age hillfort Click to show or hide the answer
Parker's Piece (a 25–acre flat and roughly square green common, near the city centre – regarded as the birthplace of the rules of Association Football) Click to show or hide the answer
The Backs (riverside lawns where colleges back onto the River Cam)
Mathematical Bridge (a wooden bridge, reputedly built without nails)
Fitzwilliam Museum
Polar Research Institute (a tribute to Captain Scott)
Town on the Kintyre peninsula, forms one of the five regions of Scotch whisky production (now chiefly known for low quality malts) Click to show or hide the answer
Wat Tyler's revolting peasants marched to London from Click to show or hide the answer
Europe's newest capital city (since 1955) Click to show or hide the answer
Cathay Park, Tiger Bay; Sophia Gardens; Roald Dahl Plass
Adamsdown, Cathay, Ely, Roath and Splott are districts of
Said to be the birthplace of Merlin – Merlin's Oak (actually planted around the time of the Restoration) actually died (was poisoned) around 1856 but stood until 1978; the last fragment is now on display in the Civic Hall Click to show or hide the answer
Granted to the Scots in 945; the only city added to England since the Norman Conquest Click to show or hide the answer
Road haulier Eddie Stobart is based in
Scottish fishing village where the UK's first case of avian flu was recorded in 2006 Click to show or hide the answer
Dorset village made famous by the nearby chalk figure of a naked man (popularly believed to be ancient, but recently dated to about the 17th century) Click to show or hide the answer
Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) – since 1953 Click to show or hide the answer
The UK's only city with unbroken walls Click to show or hide the answer
Lord Mayor has enjoyed the honorific title of Admiral of the Dee, since at least 1528
King Charles' Tower
Famous for the twisted spire of its parish church Click to show or hide the answer
English county town, has held an annual Theatre Festival at the Festival Theatre since 1962 Click to show or hide the answer
Capital of the Cotswolds; second biggest town in Roman Britain (after London) Click to show or hide the answer
Grimsby Town play home games in Click to show or hide the answer
Remains of a Norman castle with the smallest keep in England Click to show or hide the answer
Town near Shrewsbury, famous for its translucent white bone china Click to show or hide the answer
England's oldest recorded town – famous for its annual oyster festival Click to show or hide the answer
The Old Siege House; Mercury Theatre; Firstsite art gallery
Was a county in its own right, from 1451 to 1842 Click to show or hide the answer
Belgrade Theatre
Lady Godiva rode through (according to legend)
St. Michael's Cathedral – consecrated 1962 after rebuilding
Whitley – site of the headquarters of Jaguar Land Rover – is a suburb of
Headquarters of the Royal Yacht Squadron Click to show or hide the answer
Northumberland fishing village famous for its kippers (smoked herrings) Click to show or hide the answer
National Tramway Museum (Derbyshire town) Click to show or hide the answer
Ashcroft Theatre, Fairfield Halls Click to show or hide the answer
McDonald's first UK branch was opened (1973) in
New town founded 1956 in Scotland's Stratchclyde Region Click to show or hide the answer
Essex town (London suburb) where Ford opened a plant in 1931, which since 2002 has only made engines Click to show or hide the answer
New Zealand and California are districts of (English city) Click to show or hide the answer
Granted city status in 1977, in connection with the Queen's silver jubilee
Northern Ireland's second–biggest city, and Ireland's fourth–biggest Click to show or hide the answer
UK City of Culture 2013 Click for more information
Said by some to get its name from two rivers whose names mean respectively black (or dark) and green (or clear) Click to show or hide the answer
Shakespeare Cliff and Beach Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Black Country Museum Click to show or hide the answer
House where Robert Burns lived from 1791 until his death – now a museum Click to show or hide the answer
Known as "the city of Jam, Jute and Journalism" Click to show or hide the answer
Home of D. C. Thomson & Co. (publishers of the Beano, Dandy etc.)
Cathedral (the Cathedral Church of Christ, Blessed Mary the Virgin and St. Cuthbert), along with the adjacent castle, declared a World Heritage Site in 1986 Click to show or hide the answer
Introduced the UK's first congestion charge (for a small part of the historic city centre) in October 2002 – four months before London
New town and development area in north–western Kent, between Gravesend and Dartford, named after the river that it straddles which was sacred to the Celts Click to show or hide the answer
Monmouthshire mining town represented in Parliament by Aneurin Bevan, 1926–60 Click to show or hide the answer
Derbyshire village at the southern end of the Pennine Way (foot of Kinder Scout) Click to show or hide the answer
Haymarket and Waverley railway stations Click to show or hide the answer
Holyrood Palace
The Royal Mile (a succession of streets, leading from the Castle through the old town to Holyrood Palace)
Arthur's Seat (a volcanic 'plug' in Holyrood Park, on the outskirts of the city)
Usher Hall
Calton Hill, Salisbury Crags
Heriot Watt and Napier Universities
Monument to Sir Walter Scott
Dunedin is an ancient name for
National Waterways Museum ('The Boat Museum') – industrial town on the Wirral, named after a town in Shropshire to which it is connected via canals (but not as directly as was intended) Click to show or hide the answer
St. Davids Railway Station (also Central) Click to show or hide the answer
Parliament Street – probably the world's second narrowest street Click for more information
Village on the outskirts of Brighton: location of the American Express Community (Amex) Stadium, home of Brighton & Hove Albion FC since 2011, and home to the University of Sussex (Brighton University also has a campus nearby) Click to show or hide the answer
Suffolk seaport – the UK's largest container port. At the end of the A14 Click to show or hide the answer
The one of the six Potteries towns that Arnold Bennett didn't include in his five – dubbed 'the Town that Bennett Forgot' Click to show or hide the answer
Town at the Southern end of Loch Ness Click to show or hide the answer
Village in Perthshire (Scotland), whose churchyard has a famous yew tree, said to be the oldest living tree in Europe; local legend claims it to be the birthplace of Pontius Pilate Click to show or hide the answer
Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art (opened 2002); Sage (centre for musical education and performance – opened 2004) Click to show or hide the answer
Charing Cross and St. Enoch's railway stations Click to show or hide the answer
St. Mungo's Cathedral
Burrell art collection; Kelvingrove Art Gallery
Britain's second oldest underground railway system (opened 1896)
Barlinnie Prison
Mayfest (annually, 1983–1997)
Mount Vernon (birthplace of actor John Barrowman) is a suburb of
The UK's first European City of Culture (1990) Click for more information
Children's museum 'Eureka' Click to show or hide the answer
Bettys and Taylors tea rooms (no apostrophes!) or Bettys Café Tea Rooms – opened 1919, since expanded to other Yorkshire towns, including York Click to show or hide the answer
Inhabitants are sometimes known as "monkey hangers", their forebears being widely believed to have hung a monkey during the Napoleonic wars, thinking it was a French spy Click to show or hide the answer
Essex seaport, stands to the south of the confluence of the Orwell and Stour estuaries – the only safe anchorage between the Thames and the Humber Click to show or hide the answer
Home of Heinz Click to show or hide the answer
Herefordshire town famous for its second hand bookshops and annual literary festival Click to show or hide the answer
Cornish town famous for its annual Furry Dance (May) Click to show or hide the answer
The North Tyne and South Tyne converge in Click to show or hide the answer
Village (hamlet) in West Sussex: gives its name to the All England (Show) Jumping Course – venue for the Royal International Horse Show since 1992 Click to show or hide the answer
Capital of the Scilly Isles Click to show or hide the answer
Paragon Interchange (railway station opened 1847; bus station added in the 1930s; reopened in 2007 as … Paragon Interchange) Click to show or hide the answer
Land of Green Ginger (no definite article; previously – until about 1700 – known as Old Beverley Street) is a street in
Has its own telephone company, with distinctive cream–coloured call boxes
Wilberforce House, the birthplace of politician, abolitionist and social reformer William Wilberforce (1759–1833) – now a museum – is in the High Street of
Associated with the poets Andrew Marvell (born 14 miles to the east in 1621, moved there as a child and attended its Grammar School), Stevie Smith (born there in 1902, family moved to London when she was three), and Philip Larkin (worked as University Librarian there from 1955 until his death in 1985)
UK City of Culture 2017 Click for more information
London suburb, formerly in Essex: administrative headquarters of the London Borough of Redbridge Click to show or hide the answer
Gants Hill tube station and the Kenneth More Theatre
Gave its name to a photographic film and chemicals manufacturer, founded 1879, closed 1976
Capital of the Highlands (of Scotland) Click to show or hide the answer
The UK's most northerly city (one of the Millennium cities, created in 2000)
Shropshire village, near the site of Abraham Darby's coal smelting works at Coalbrookdale: named after the structure built there from 1777 and opened in 1781 (Abraham Darby's grandson, Abraham Darby III, was involved in the building project, although his commission for the building work was withdrawn in 1776) Click to show or hide the answer
Town on the south bank of the Tyne, downriver from Gateshead: associated with the Venerable Bede (he lived in its monastery and died there in 735) and the march against unemployment of 1936; also the birthplace of Steve Cram Click to show or hide the answer
Situated just north of Derwentwater Click to show or hide the answer
Town between Bristol and Bath, made famous in the 1950s (and early 1960s) by adverts on Radio Luxembourg for Horace Batchelor's 'Infra–draw' method for winning on the football pools Click to show or hide the answer
Worcestershire town famous for carpet making Click to show or hide the answer
North Yorkshire village (on the edge of the North York Moors) famous for Britain's largest chalk "White Horse", carved by a local schoolmaster and his pupils in 1857 Click to show or hide the answer
Full name of Hull Click to show or hide the answer
Principal town of Orkney Click to show or hide the answer
Scottish village (in the Borders Region) at the northern end of the Pennine Way Click to show or hide the answer
Town in Co. Mayo where a vision of the Virgin Mary was seen in 1879 Click to show or hide the answer
Midlands town, name preceded by 'Royal' Click to show or hide the answer
Highest navigable point on the Thames Click to show or hide the answer
Armley Jail; the Royal Armouries Museum Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
(Britain's) National Space Centre (opened in 2001) - cf. Swindon Click to show or hide the answer
De Montfort Hall (and University)
Port of Edinburgh: the Royal yacht Britannia is permanently moored there following decommissioning in 1997 Click to show or hide the answer
Most northerly town in the British Isles Click to show or hide the answer
The first garden city (founded in 1903 through the garden city movement – a method of urban planning, initiated in 1898 by Sir Ebenezer Howard; Welwyn was the second; also see Stevenage) Click to show or hide the answer
Home of the world's first traffic roundabout (introduced in 1909)
Sussex town, famous for its anti–Catholic bonfire celebrations on 5th November (commemorating the 17 Protestant martyrs burnt at the stake there under Mary I) Click to show or hide the answer
Memorial statue to Edward J. Smith, captain of the Titanic – who was born in Hanley, Stoke–on–Trent – unveiled July 1914 (5 days before the outbreak of WWI) Click to show or hide the answer
Lime Street station Click to show or hide the answer
Walker Art Gallery
Walton Gaol
Bluecoat Arts Centre – the oldest building in the city centre (built in 1718 as the Blue Coat School for poor children, which moved to Wavertree in 1906)
Tate Gallery, Wapping, Fleet Street: found in London and
European Capital of Culture, 2008 Click for more information
Carmarthenshire town associated with the tin plating industry – the Welsh folk song Sospan Fach (Little Saucepan) is the anthem of its rugby club Click to show or hide the answer
Royal Mint (since 1968 – known locally as "the hole with the mint") Click to show or hide the answer
Has the world's biggest and oldest underground railway, and the world's oldest rapid transit system Click to show or hide the answer
The UN General Assembly met for the first time (1946) in
Market town on the river Lud: self–proclaimed "Capital of the Lincolnshire Wolds" Click to show or hide the answer
Great Britain's most easterly town Click to show or hide the answer
Bedfordshire town famous for hat making Click to show or hide the answer
Harbour wall known as The Cobb (made famous in The French Lieutenant's Woman; also features in Jane Austen's Persuasion) Click to show or hide the answer
The Premium Bonds Organisation was based, from its foundation in 1956 until approximately 1996, in Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
The Football League's headquarters, from 1959 until approximately 1999, were in (see Preston)
Nearest town to the Centre for Alternative Technology Click to show or hide the answer
Headquarters of the Equal Opportunities Commission, and of Ofsted Click to show or hide the answer
Piccadilly and Victoria railway stations
The Ford motor company's first manufacturing plant outside the USA (opened 1911, moved to a bigger site at Dagenham, Essex, in 1931)
Royal Exchange Theatre; Whitworth Art Gallery; G–Mex Centre
Free Trade Hall (1853–1996); Bridgewater Hall (opened 1996)
Urbis exhibition centre (opened 2002)
Strangeways Prison
Chill Factor–e indoor ski centre (opened 2007)
Town linked by a causeway at low tide to St. Michael's Mount, Cornwall Click to show or hide the answer
Shropshire town, claims to be the home of gingerbread ("the oldest cake bread in the world" – BBC website) Click to show or hide the answer
Theakston's brewery (North Yorkshire market town) Click to show or hide the answer
Overlooked by Riber Castle – built in 1862, home to a controversial wildlife park from 1960 to 2000 (Derbyshire town) Click to show or hide the answer
Leicestershire town famous for Stilton cheeses and pork pies Click to show or hide the answer
West Midlands village, near Coventry (formerly in Warwickshire) – traditionally regarded as the centre of England Click to show or hide the answer
Cheshire town: founded by the Romans, who named it Salinae for its salt deposits; the Shropshire Canal meets the Trent & Mersey here; also the rivers Croco and Wheelock meet the Dane on its outskirts Click to show or hide the answer
Bletchley Park – site of the UK's main decryption establishment in WWII, now a museum and also home to the National Museum of Computing (opened 2007) Click to show or hide the answer
Frontierland (theme park) Click to show or hide the answer
Shropshire town, venue of an annual "Olympic" games competition, dating from 1850, which inspired the modern Olympic games (Pierre de Coubertin visited in 1890). One of the 2012 mascots was named in their honour Click to show or hide the answer
Lancashire town, formed in the early 19th century by the merger of Great and Little Marsden (villages) Click to show or hide the answer
Greenham Common US air base was near (Berkshire town) Click to show or hide the answer
England's most northerly city Click to show or hide the answer
The Hoppings – annual fair held on the Town Moor
Cornish seaside town (near Penzance) from which the Ordnance Survey measures heights above mean sea level Click to show or hide the answer
Suffolk town almost entirely surrounded by Cambridgeshire Click to show or hide the answer
Capital of the Isle of Wight Click to show or hide the answer
Northern Ireland's third largest town – formed 1958 by merging seven villages Click to show or hide the answer
Bernard Matthews's turkey farm (Norfolk town) Click to show or hide the answer
The UK's most easterly city; headquarters of Anglia TV Click to show or hide the answer
Home of Colman's mustard, and the Colman's Mustard Museum
The first Luddite riots (1811); the first public telephone kiosk (1908) Click to show or hide the answer
Annual Goose Fair
National Watersports Centre (Holme Pierrepoint)
Britain's National Ice Skating Centre (opened 2000)
Ye Olde Trip to Jerusalem (claims to be Britain's oldest public house)
Lace Market (once the heart of the world's lace–making industry)
Headquarters of Boot's the Chemist, Raleigh Bicycles, Player's Cigarettes
Beeston, Hockley and Hyson Green are areas of
County town of Rutland Click to show or hide the answer
The Bodleian Library, including the Radcliffe Camera, is part of the University of Click to show or hide the answer
Martyrs' Memorial (to archbishops Cranmer, Ridley and Latimer)
Ashmolean Museum; Sheldonian Theatre
Headquarters of Thames Valley Police
The Carfax Tower – the remains of a 12th–century church – is considered to be the centre of ("carfax" is an anglicisation of the Latin for a crossroads, via the French carrefour)
Gave its name to a 19th century religious movement, and (courtesy of its university) to a style of loose–fitting trousers, popular in the first half of the 20th century; also formal styles for shoes and shirts
Served by Mumps railway station, from 1847, until its closure in 2009 to be replaced by a Metrolink tram stop from 2012 (named after the district of the town, whose name is probably derived from a dialect word for a beggar) Click to show or hide the answer
Cornish seaside town, famous for its May Day Hobby Horse ('Obby 'Oss) festival and for Rick Stein's (several) seafood restaurants Click to show or hide the answer
The major fishing port on the Isle of Man; St. German's Cathedral – seat of the Bishop of Sodor and Man Click to show or hide the answer
Traditionally part of Northamptonshire, though separately administered; joined with Huntingdonshire in 1965–74, now part of Cambridgeshire Click to show or hide the answer
Scotland's most easterly town (fishing centre, 30 miles north of Aberdeen) Click to show or hide the answer
New town in Co. Durham, built after World War II and named after a famous miners' leader who died in 1935 Click to show or hide the answer
The River Tamar flows into the sea at Click to show or hide the answer
The largest city in England never to have had a top flight football team, since Hull's promotion to the Premiership in 2008
Same changed from Sutton in the 15th century
Market town in West Yorkshire, famous for liquorice (its sandy soil makes it one of the few places in the UK where the plant can be grown; in 2015 there were still two factories there producing liquorice, but the plant is no longer actually grown there) Click to show or hide the answer
Name comes (according to local tradition) from the Latin for "broken bridge"
Headquarters of the RNLI Click to show or hide the answer
Welsh village designed in Italianate style by Clough Williams–Ellis, famous for its pottery and for being used as the setting for the cult 60s TV series The Prisoner Click to show or hide the answer
Welsh coastal town founded 1811 by William Madocks, MP for Boston, Lincolnshire, when he built a sea wall to create agricultural land Click to show or hide the answer
HMS Victory; Mary Rose Exhibition Click to show or hide the answer
The UK's only island city Click for more information
The Hard (originally a slipway – now a transport interchange)
Charles Dickens Birthplace Museum
D–Day Museum (opened in 1984, on the 40th anniversary) Click for more information
Spinnaker Tower – opened in 2005: the tallest building open to the public in Britain, outside London (at 558 ft – 4 ft higher than Manchester's Beetham Tower)
Cornish coastal town: home of the shanty–singers Fisherman's Friends, and used as a filming location for several TV dramas including Doc Martin Click to show or hide the answer
Model village set up on the Wirral by William Lever in 1828;
named after the first branded household soap
Click to show or hide the answer
Formed in 1921 by the amalgamation of Aberavon and Margram Click to show or hide the answer
Experimental model town on the outskirts of Dorchester, on land owned by the Duchy of Cornwall; construction started in 1993, based on an initiative of Prince Charles, and was planned to take 25 years Click to show or hide the answer
England's National Football Museum opened, in 2001, in (moved to Manchester in 2012) Click to show or hide the answer
Headquarters of the Football League (except from 1959 until approximately 1999 when they were at Lytham St. Annes)
Garth prison
Nearest village to Dartmoor Prison Click to show or hide the answer
Village on the Firth of Forth, now a suburb of Edinburgh, between the road and rail bridges (now often referred to as South …, to distinguish it from North … on the other bank) Click to show or hide the answer
Forbury Gardens – featuring the Maiwand Lion, a memorial to (and named after) one of the principal battles of the Second Anglo–Afghan war (1878–80) Click to show or hide the answer
Fishing village between Scarborough and Whitby, with a history of smuggling: known locally as Bay Town Click to show or hide the answer
Eastern extremity of Wainwright's Coast to Coast path
The Co–operative movement was founded, in 1844, in Click to show or hide the answer
City in Kent and port in New York State Click to show or hide the answer
Formerly (but never officially) known as New Sarum (Old Sarum is an ancient fort from which the modern city essentially developed); bishops have used Sarum as their Latin title since the 14th century; its cathedral has the world's oldest working clock Click to show or hide the answer
Model town near Bradford, built in 1853 and now a World Heritage Site; named after its founder, mill owner Titus Salt, and the local river Click to show or hide the answer
Has an art gallery devoted to the works of David Hockney
Cheshire town where Foden and ERF lorries are manufactured Click to show or hide the answer
Stephen Joseph Theatre (Alan Ayckbourn was its Artistic Director, 1972–2009) Click to show or hide the answer
Crucible Theatre Click to show or hide the answer
Hallam Arena, (and University)
Meadowhall shopping centre (near)
National Centre for Popular Music (opened 1999, closed 2000; now a Students' Union building for Hallam University)
Kelham Island Industrial Museum
The rivers Loxley, Sheaf and Rivelin, and the Porter Brook, all join the Don in
Gold Hill – made famous in the 1973 Hovis advert (where the delivery boy had to push his bike up the hill, to the tune from Dvořák's New World symphony) – is in (Dorset town) Click to show or hide the answer
Welsh Bridge, Kingsland Bridge Click to show or hide the answer
" ... so bracing" (famous advertising campaign) Click to show or hide the answer
Has four tides a day Click to show or hide the answer
HQ of the Ordnance Survey
The world's longest pleasure pier Click to show or hide the answer
British Lawnmower Museum Click to show or hide the answer
Seaside resort that forms the southern half of Portsmouth Click to show or hide the answer
Smallest English town with a cathedral Click to show or hide the answer
Berkshire village (now part of Newbury) that gave its name to a system of poor relief that was devised there (by local magistrates) in 1795 Click to show or hide the answer
Headquarters of CAMRA Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's smallest and most westerly city – population 1,797 (2001 census) Click to show or hide the answer
Lost its city status in 1888 for legal reasons; city status was officially granted in 1994 in belated celebration of the 40th anniversary of the Queen's accession
World of Glass (museum) Click to show or hide the answer
Barbara Hepworth Museum and Sculpture Garden (Cornwall town) Click to show or hide the answer
Town in Greater Manchester (formerly Cheshire) with Britain's longest and shortest pub names (The Old Thirteenth Cheshire Astley Volunteer Rifleman Corps Inn, and Q, respectively) Click to show or hide the answer
The Wallace Monument, on the summit of Abbey Craig, is just outside Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's first New Town, created under the New Towns Act 1946 (designated 11 November 1946; cf. Letchworth) Click to show or hide the answer
'The Other Place' Theatre Click to show or hide the answer
Gloucestershire town: gave its name to (probably the origin of) blankets used for trading with Native Americans Click to show or hide the answer
Granted city status in 1992, in connection with the 40th anniversary of the Queen's accession Click to show or hide the answer
"The Magic Roundabout" (a complicated gyratory system of traffic roundabouts) Click to show or hide the answer
Headquarters of Honda UK
Headquarters of the UK Space Agency (known before 2010 as the British National Space Centre – cf. Leicester)
STEAM – the museum of the Great Western Railway (on the site that was once the GWR's locomotive works)
Originally designated 1963 as Dawley New Town; also includes Wellington, Oakengates, Madeley Click to show or hide the answer
The Warwickshire Avon (a.k.a. Shakespeare's Avon) flows into the Severn at (Gloucestershire town) Click to show or hide the answer
Essex town, between Chelmsford and Colchester: famous for Wilkin & Sons' jam factory Click to show or hide the answer
Torquay, Brixham, Paignton: collectively (mid–way between Exeter and Plymouth, on the south coast of Devon – known to tourist authorities as The English Riviera) Click to show or hide the answer
Village in Snowdonia National Park, approx. 4 miles east of Porthmadog: name means "across [the] mountain; gives its name to a man–made reservoir (built in the 1920s to feed a hydro–electric power station) and a nuclear power station beside it (operational 1965–91) Click to show or hide the answer
Cornwall's only city; England's most westerly, and the UK's most southerly Click to show or hide the answer
The Pantiles is the historic and tourist centre of Click to show or hide the answer
Oxfordshire village (formerly in Berkshire) famous for its Bronze Age white horse – probably the oldest in Britain Click to show or hide the answer
Loopallu festival – annually since 2005 (coastal town in the north of Scotland) Click to show or hide the answer
Laurel & Hardy Museum Click to show or hide the answer
Midland town, famous for saddle making Click to show or hide the answer
Bank Quay railway station Click to show or hide the answer
Ikea opened its first UK store, 1987, in
England's smallest cathedral city (Somerset) Click to show or hide the answer
Founded in the 1920s by Sir Ebeneezer Howard (following his success with Letchworth) Click to show or hide the answer
The Public (community arts project, based in; and its controversial headquarters): opened in 2008, cost £72 million, closed 2013, re–opened in 2014 as a sixth–form college building Click to show or hide the answer
Wiltshire village famous for one of Britain's oldest "White Horses" (before 1742) Click to show or hide the answer
Seaside town in North Devon, named after a novel by Charles Kingsley – the only place in Britain with an exclamation mark in its name Click to show or hide the answer
A whalebone arch (on the West Cliff) commemorates the historic link with the whaling industry of Click to show or hide the answer
The best Cheshire cheeses are said (paradoxically, because it's in Shropshire) to be made within a 20 mile radius of Click to show or hide the answer
Kentish seaport, known since Roman times for its oysters Click to show or hide the answer
Birthplace of the alkali industry (19th century) Click to show or hide the answer
Wallgate and North Western railway stations Click to show or hide the answer
The River Douglas was diverted in 1892 to make way for a railway station, in
East Sussex village famous for the nearby 17th century chalk figure known as the Long Man Click to show or hide the answer
Commonly described as the ancient capital of Wessex; capital of England in the 11th and 12th centuries – superseded by London Click to show or hide the answer
Gives its name to the UK's Legoland resort – opened 1996, on the site of a former safari park which had gone into receivership in 1992 Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's first mosque (1889) and its first cremation (1884) Click to show or hide the answer
Midland town (now a city), had High Level and Low Level railway stations, up to 1965 (Low Level was closed for passenger services in 1972, and altogether in 1981; High Level was rebuilt in 1965, since when it's been known known only by the name of the town/city) Click to show or hide the answer
Wiltshire market town, became noted for informal public mourning as the remains of troops killed in the Afghanistan war were taken from RAF Lyneham; granted a royal charter (the right to precede its name with 'Royal') in 2011 – the first English town for over 100 years to be given this honour Click to show or hide the answer
Shrub Hill and Foregate Street railway stations Click to show or hide the answer
Major town of The Dukeries (Nottinghamshire) Click to show or hide the answer
Norfolk village that gave its name to a fine woollen fabric Click to show or hide the answer
The Fleet Air Arm Museum is near (Somerset town) Click to show or hide the answer
Stands at the confluence of the Foss with the Yorkshire Ouse Click to show or hide the answer
Bootham Bar, Monk Bar, Walmgate Bar and Micklegate Bar are the four main gatehouses in the city walls of
Clifford's Tower (the keep, and only remaining part, of the Castle)
Micklegate, Whip–ma–Whop–ma–gate and The Shambles are streets in
National Railway Museum, Jorvik Viking Centre

© Haydn Thompson 2017