Monkey

Quiz Monkey
What do you want to know?

You are here:

Geography
Towns and Cities
USA and Canada

On this page:

USA
Canada

If you like my website, and/or if you've found it useful, please consider making a small donation to my Just Giving page, which I've set up just for this purpose. To begin with I'm collecting for a charity whose work I have benefitted from myself (and continue to do so): the British Heart Foundation. It would be great to raise £100 in the first month.

If you have already donated ... Thank You!

Towns and Cities: USA and Canada

USA

Largest city in the Texas panhandle; name is Spanish for 'yellow' Click to show or hide the answer
Former mining town in the Colorado Rockies: 2010 population  6,658; popularised by the likes of Hunter S. Thompson and John Denver, among the countercultural youth of the 1970s, as an ideal place to live; said to be the most expensive place to buy real estate in the US Click to show or hide the answer
The home of Coca–Cola, since its invention in 1886 Click to show or hide the answer
The tidal portion of the Patapsco River forms the harbour of Click to show or hide the answer
Southend, Brighton, Dorchester and Hyde Park are suburbs of Click to show or hide the answer
Stands at the mouth of the Charles River
Home to the world's oldest annual marathon (every year since 1897 – the year after the first modern marathon was run at the inaugural Olympic Games)
Fenway Park – the oldest park in the USA Major Baseball League (home to the Red Sox)
Second most populous city in New York state, and nearest city to the Niagara Falls – on the eastern shore of Lake Erie and at the head of the Niagara River Click to show or hide the answer
Town on the Monterey Peninsula, California: elected Clint Eastwood as Mayor (1986–8) Click to show or hide the answer
Third most populous city in the USA: almost destroyed in 1871 by a fire, caused (according to a newspaper report whose author admitted in 1893 that he made it up) by a cow kicking over a lantern in a barn owned by Patrick and Catherine O'Leary Click to show or hide the answer
St. Valentine's Day Massacre, 1929
The Loop is the central district of
Soldier Field (football – home of the Bears), Wrigley Field (baseball – home of the Cubs)
Headquarters of Encyclopaedia Britannica
Alexander Graham Bell's first long–distance telephone call was from New York to
Uses 45 pounds of eco–friendly vegetable dye to dye its river green on St. Patrick's Day (since around 1960)
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum Click to show or hide the answer
'City' (part of the San José conurbation) where Apple, Inc. has its headquarters Click to show or hide the answer
6th Floor Museum at the Dealey Plaza (commemorating an historic event of the 20th century) Click to show or hide the answer
Florida tourist destination, famous for its hard–packed sand on which you can drive your car Click to show or hide the answer
Home of NASCAR (the US National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing)
Grew up around Fort Pontchartrain, which was founded in 1701 by French army officer Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac Click to show or hide the answer
Nicknamed Motown; home of Tamla Motown
Third–largest city in Arkansas (after Little Rock and Fort Smith), and home to the University of Arkansas Click to show or hide the answer
Bill and Hillary Clinton both taught at the university, and their home (930 West Clinton Drive) is now a museum
Texan city, named after a general in the Mexican–American war of 1846-8 Click to show or hide the answer
Calls itself "Where the West Begins"; also nicknamed Cowtown or Panther City
Iolani Palace: official residence of a monarchy overthrown in 1893 – the USA's only royal palace Click to show or hide the answer
Largest city in Texas, and 4th largest in the USA Click to show or hide the answer
Capital of the Republic of Texas, during its brief existence 1837-45
Named after the second president of the Republic of Texas
Home of the Astrodome – home to the Astros (baseball); also home to the Rockets (basketball) and the Texans (NFL)
Headquarters of the CIA ("unincorporated community" in Virginia) Click to show or hide the answer
Name is Spanish for 'The Plains' or 'The Meadows' Click to show or hide the answer
MGM Grand – the World's biggest hotel (5,000+ rooms)
Name shared by a major city in Kentucky, famous for horse–breeding, and the small town in Massachusetts where the first action of the American War of Independence took place in 1775 Click to show or hide the answer
US state capital with the same name as an English county town Click to show or hide the answer
Second most populous city in the USA (after New York) Click to show or hide the answer
Dolby Theatre (known before 2012 as the Kodak Theatre), Shrine Auditorium, Dorothy Chandler Pavilion Click for more information
Mulholland Drive (exclusive residential street)
Rodeo Drive (up–market shopping street)
Venice (beachfront area)
Manhattan Beach (affluent seaside suburb)
Named after the ancient capital of Egypt
Headquarters of KFC Click to show or hide the answer
Beale Street – Home of the Blues Click to show or hide the answer
Gracelands (Elvis Presley's last home)
Sun Studio
US National Civil Rights Museum
The world's busiest passenger seaport Click to show or hide the answer
On the shores of Lake Michigan; famous for meatpacking and brewing – once home to Schlitz, Blatz, Pabst and Miller – only the last now remains Click to show or hide the answer
The least populous of the 50 US state capitals (7,855 in 2010) Click to show or hide the answer
Grand Ole Opry Click to show or hide the answer
USA's busiest port Click to show or hide the answer
Known as the birthplace of jazz
Louis Armstrong Park, Jackson Square (National Historic Park; beware – other US cities have Jackson Squares)
Ponchartrain is a suburb of
Bourbon Street (famous for its drinking establishments and other "entertainment" venues), Rampart Street, Basin Street
Saint Charles Avenue streetcar line is a national historic landmark in (see also San Francisco) Click for more information
Headquarters of the United Nations Click to show or hide the answer
A Knickerbocker is someone who lives in
Carnegie Hall (named after Scottish–born philanthropist Andrew Carnegie)
Guggenheim Museum, Metropolitan Opera House
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, including the Juilliard School
Castle Garden (built as a fort in 1807, later a concert hall and immigrant station, now a Federal monument)
The Bowery – street once notorious for its criminal population and distinctive dialect
Nebraska's most populous city, and the only city that gave its name to one of the D–Day beaches Click to show or hide the answer
Rose Bowl (sporting venue) Click to show or hide the answer
Name means 'brotherly love'; sometimes referred to as the City of Brotherly Love Click to show or hide the answer
Stands at the confluence of the Delaware and Schuylkill (school-kill) rivers
The Liberty Bell is housed (in a purpose–built chamber, since 2009) in
Thomas Jefferson University
The USA's fifth most populous city, and (with just over 1.6 million inhabitants in 2016) the only state capital with a population of over a million Click to show or hide the answer
Named after a British Prime minister Click to show or hide the answer
Site (in Massachusetts) of the colony founded in 1620 by passengers from the Mayflower (there is no contemporary evidence that they actually used the famous Rock, named after the colony, to step ashore) Click to show or hide the answer
New Jersey town: home of an Ivy League university, and also of the Institute of Advanced Studies (established 1930), one of whose first scholars was Albert Einstein; he died there in 1955 Click to show or hide the answer
Founded by English puritan Roger Williams on 4 July 1636 Click to show or hide the answer
Town at the tip of Cape Cod, Massachusetts: site of the Mayflower pilgrims' first landfall in America (they were trying to get to Virginia Colony, but were driven back by stong winds) Click to show or hide the answer
Virginia town, home of the FBI Academy and US Marine Corps' Officer Training School Click to show or hide the answer
Capital of the Confederacy during the US Civil War Click to show or hide the answer
City in Kent and port in New York State Click to show or hide the answer
Founded 1847 by Brigham Young and his Mormon followers; the church still has its headquarters there, and almost half of the population are Mormons Click to show or hide the answer
California's third most populous city (after Los Angeles and San Diego), and the USA's tenth: shares its name with a Central American capital Click to show or hide the answer
Candlestick Park Click to show or hide the answer
Headquarters of Levi Strauss
Fisherman's Wharf (centre for tourist attractions)
Lombard Street (famous for its series of hairpin bends)
Devastated by an earthquake and subsequent fire, in 1906
Largest population of ethnic Chinese people outside Asia
Cable cars are a national historic landmark Click for more information
California city, about half–way between Los Angeles and San Francisco, described by Oprah Winfrey (among others) as "the happiest city in America"; became the first to ban smoking in public places, in 1990 Click to show or hide the answer
Boeing was founded (1916) in (its HQ, but not manufacturing, moved to Chicago in 2001) Click to show or hide the answer
Home to Amazon and Starbucks; Microsoft is based in Redmond, 16 miles away
Birthplace of Jimi Hendrix, and centre of the 1990s grunge genre
Missouri's largest city – at the junction of the Mississippi and Missouri Click to show or hide the answer
Baseball and football teams have the same name (Cardinals)
Gateway Arch (a.k.a. Gateway to the West) – at 630 ft (192 m), the USA's tallest monument and the world's tallest arch; completed in 1965
The first city outside Europe to host the Olympics (1904)
City in New York State, named after a Sicilian port Click to show or hide the answer
Home to the University of Arizona, and also to Jo–Jo in The Beatles' Get Back Click to show or hide the answer
Headquarters of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) Click to show or hide the answer
Smithsonian Institution – the world's largest museum and research centre

Canada

'Steel City of Canada' Click to show or hide the answer
Venue of the first British Empire Games (1930)
The world's second–largest French–speaking city (i.e. second greatest number of French speakers); largest city in Quebec province, second largest in Canada, and ninth largest in North America; built (originally and still mainly) on an island at the confluence of the St. Lawrence and Ottawa rivers Click to show or hide the answer
Expo '67 was held in
Champlain Bridge, Jacques Cartier Bridge
Hotel de la Reine – scene of John & Yoko's 'bed–in', 26 May 1969
Overlooked by the Plains of Abraham Click to show or hide the answer
Capital of Saskatchewan – founded in 1882 as Pile o' Bones Click to show or hide the answer
Canada's largest city and financial centre, home to its Stock Exchange; fourth largest city in North America (2011 population 2,615,060) Click to show or hide the answer
CN Tower – the world's tallest man–made freestanding structure, from its completion in 1976 until 2007
Skydome – multi–purpose sports centre, opened 1989, renamed 2005 the Rogers Centre
Granville Island, False Creek, English Bay and Coal Harbour are coastal features of Click to show or hide the answer
Canada's southernmost city – south of Detroit – other side of the Detroit River Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017–18