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History
Ancient History
Britain

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Stonehenge
Roman Britain
Other

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Ancient Britain

This page covers the history (and archaeology) of Britain, before the Norman Conquest of 1066 AD.

Stonehenge

Stonehenge built Click to show or hide the answer
The 56 pits that form one of the outermost circles of Stonehenge (but the innermost circle of the earliest phase of building) – named after the 17th century antiquarian who is thought to have identified them Click to show or hide the answer
Range of hills in Pembrokeshire from which the 80 "blue" stones of Stonehenge (not the largest Sarsen stones) were quarried Click to show or hide the answer
Type of sandstone from which the five trilithons of Stonehenge (and many other megalithic monuments) are made Click to show or hide the answer

Roman Britain

Julius Caesar landed in Britain (he failed to conquer it, having to return to Gaul to quell a revolt) Click to show or hide the answer
Emperor at the time of the Roman conquest of Britain (43 AD) – came to Britain to accept the surrender in person Click to show or hide the answer
Roman senator who led the Claudian invasion of 43 AD, and became the first Roman governor of Britain Click to show or hide the answer
The Romans finally left Britain around Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer

Built in 122–128 AD, from the Roman fort at Segedunum (now Wallsend, Tyne & Wear) to Bowness–on–Solway Click to show or hide the answer
Hadrian's Wall: length Click to show or hide the answer
Roman wall from the Forth to the Clyde – built in 142–154 AD Click to show or hide the answer
Roman road from London to the Humber and York (via Lincoln) Click to show or hide the answer
Roman road from Lincoln to Exeter, via Leicester, Cirencester and Bath Click to show or hide the answer
Ancient track following high ground from The Wash to Berkshire Click to show or hide the answer
Roman road from Dover to Wroxeter (Shropshire), via London; Edgeware Road is built on it Click to show or hide the answer

Wife of King Prasutagus; rebelled against the Romans c. 60 AD; said to have invoked Andraste, the British goddess of victory, by releasing a hare from her skirts before fighting the Romans; captured Colchester, St. Albans and London; slaughtered 70,000; eventually defeated somewhere in the Midlands. Buried, according to an urban myth dating at least to a 1937 biography, under King's Cross Station; but this is based on a misunderstanding and possibly a hoax – her actual burial place is unknown Click to show or hide the answer
Leader of the British tribes against the Roman invasion Click to show or hide the answer
Father of Cara(c)tacus Click to show or hide the answer
Caratacus's capital, captured by the Romans following the 43 AD invasion Click to show or hide the answer
Second–biggest town in Roman Britain (after London) – now in Gloucestershire Click to show or hide the answer

Other

The oldest known name for Britain, derived from the Celtic word for "earth" or "world" Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
King of Britain said to have invented a candle clock Click to show or hide the answer
Collection of annals created in the reign of Alfred the Great Click to show or hide the answer
Welsh king who used the leek as his badge when fighting the Saxons, c. 640 AD Click to show or hide the answer
Son of Sweyn (Forkbeard), King of Norway; became King of England by defeating Ethelred the Unready Click to show or hide the answer
Gaelic kingdom that covered parts of western Scotland and (Northern) Ireland, at its height around 600 AD Click to show or hide the answer
9th Century tax raised as protection money to pay off the Vikings, or to fund forces to oppose them Click to show or hide the answer
Land ceded by King Alfred to King Guthrum of Denmark, 878 Click to show or hide the answer
Priestly and learned classes of the Celts Click to show or hide the answer
Major seaport of Suffolk, engulfed by the sea as a result of storms and coastal erosion in the 13th to 16th centuries Click to show or hide the answer
Wife of Leofric, Earl of Mercia (born c. 1040 – the famous legend probably has no basis in fact) Click to show or hide the answer
Neolithic flint mining site near Brandon, Suffolk (near the Norfolk border) Click to show or hide the answer
The seven Anglo–Saxon kingdoms, prior to 900 AD Click to show or hide the answer
Popular name locally for the long barrow near Uley, Gloucestershire Click to show or hide the answer
Anglo–Saxon leader, famous for defending the Isle of Ely against William the Conqueror Click to show or hide the answer
Boudicca's tribe Click to show or hide the answer
Earl of Mercia and lord of Coventry (968–1057) – husband of Lady Godiva Click to show or hide the answer
Famous stone circle near Penrith, Cumbria (the largest in Northern England) Click to show or hide the answer
Anglo–Saxon kingdom that eventually covered the English Midlands, extending between the estuaries of the Wyre, Humber, Severn and (almost) the Thames; Offa and Penda were Kings of Click to show or hide the answer
Bronze Age stone circle on Stanton Moor (Peak District) Click to show or hide the answer
8th–century earthwork through the English–Welsh borders, from the Dee at Prestatyn to the Severn Estuary at Chepstow – named after the King of Mercia (757–796) Click to show or hide the answer
Reputedly the father of St. Helena and hence grandfather of Constantine the Great Click to show or hide the answer
Neolithic Orkney village, buried under a sand dune until 1850 Click to show or hide the answer
Mediaeval tax based on one–tenth of a person's possessions Click to show or hide the answer
Name used in Yorkshire and other northern counties for a sub–division of the county – similar to the southern Hundred – originating from the Danish occupation Click to show or hide the answer
King Alfred's first kingdom Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017