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Warships

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Types of ship
Submarines (development of)
Arks Royal
Ships
Miscellaneous

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Warships

See also World War II: Ships.

Types of ship

According to Wikipedia, modern warships are generally divided into seven main categories. Three of them are aircraft carrier, submarine, and amphibious assault ship – each of which (one would have thought) are too obvious to come up in any self–respecting quiz. The other four are:

Originally one of the small, lightly armed ships ordered by Winston Churchill at the start of World War II; based on a commercial whale catcher, its primary attribute was ease of construction as an emergency wartime anti–submarine weapon. Traditionally the smallest class of vessel considered to be a proper warship Click to show or hide the answer
A fast, independent warship; traditionally, the smallest warships capable of independent action; along with battleships and battlecruisers, they have largely vanished from modern navies Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
A fast and highly maneuverable warship, traditionally incapable of independent action; originally developed to counter the threat of torpedo boats, and now the largest independent warship generally seen on the ocean Click to show or hide the answer
In the age of sail, a small, fast ship used for patrolling and escorting larger warships; used since WWII for a variety of small, fast ships often not dissimilar to destroyers, cruisers, or even battleships, and used to protect merchant vessels and other warships Click to show or hide the answer

Other types:

Term used in the Royal Navy, in the 18th century, for a vessel that didn't fit any of its usual categories Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Traditionally the most heavily armed and armoured type of warship Click to show or hide the answer
New breed of warship introduced before WWI – comparable to a battleship in size and arms, but less armour; designed to outrun and outgun enemy vessels. Three (Indefatigable, Queen Mary, Invincible) were lost at Jutland in 1916; the last and most famous example was HMS Hood Click to show or hide the answer
World War I: armed British ships disguised as merchant ships, used as decoys Click to show or hide the answer

Submarines: development of

Dutch engineer who designed the first underwater boat for James I of England in 1620 Click to show or hide the answer
One–man submarine designed in the 1760s by David Bushnell – the first military submarine – used against the British in the US War of Independence, but without much success Click to show or hide the answer
Submarine designed in 1800 by the US naval engineer Robert Fulton: demonstrated to the French and the British, neither of whom took it up Click to show or hide the answer
Naval submarine (submersible torpedo ship) launched by France in 1888 Click to show or hide the answer
Designer of the first submarines to be formally commissioned by both the US Navy and the Royal Navy (in 1878 and 1900 respectively), and both named after him. (Born in Ireland in 1840; emigrated to the USA in 1873) Click to show or hide the answer

Arks Royal

The original Ark Royal was built at Deptford in 1587 for (and sold to the Royal Navy by) Click to show or hide the answer
Original name of the original Ark Royal Click to show or hide the answer

The original Ark Royal was rebuilt in 1608 by James I, renamed Anne Royal, and broken up in 1636
There have been four more Ark Royals. The second, launched in 1914, was the world's first aircraft carrier; she served in the Dardanelles and throughout WWI. She was renamed HMS Pegasus in 1934 to make way for the third Ark Royal, and broken up in 1950
The third Ark Royal was launched in 1938 and sunk by a U–boat in 1941
The fourth Ark Royal was an Audacious–class fleet aircraft carrier, launched in 1950 and commissioned 1955. She starred in the BBC TV series Sailor, and was broken up in 1980
The fifth Ark Royal was an Invincible–class aircraft carrier, launched in 1981 and commissioned in 1985. She served in the 2003 invasion of Iraq, and was decommissioned in 2011

Ships

The Royal Navy's latest aircraft carriers: the largest warships ever built in the UK Named 2014, due to enter service 2017 Click to show or hide the answer
Construction began 2011, due to enter service 2020 Click to show or hide the answer

64–gun warship commanded by Nelson, 1793 – 96 Click to show or hide the answer
Royal Navy frigate, detained in the Yangtze River for three months by Chinese Communist forces, in 1949, during the Chinese Civil War; played herself in the 1957 film about the incident, but was scrapped soon afterwards Click to show or hide the answer
Royal Navy frigate hit by two Argentine bombs on 23 May 1982, during the Falklands campaign; sank next day (see HMS Sheffield) Click to show or hide the answer
Lord Admiral Howard of Effingham's flagship against the Armada Click to show or hide the answer
Nuclear submarine that ran aground while undergoing trials off the Isle of Skye, 2010 Click to show or hide the answer
Merchant ship, owned by Cunard, requisitioned during the Falklands War; hit by two Argentinian air–launched Exocet missiles on 25 May 1982, and sank three days later while under tow Click to show or hide the answer
Charles Darwin sailed to the Galapagos Islands on board Click to show or hide the answer
The last surviving British cruiser of World War II – now a museum, moored on the Thames near Tower Bridge Click to show or hide the answer
Napoleon surrendered on 15 July 1815, to Captain Frederick Maitland, on board his (Maitland's) ship Click to show or hide the answer
Royal Navy troopship that struck a rock off Cape Town in 1852, when the first documented use of the procedure "Women and children first" occurred; subsequently gave its name to this 'drill' Click to show or hide the answer
Small merchant vessel, built in Hull in 1784 and named the Bethia; bought by the Royal Navy in 1787, and renamed; sent to the Pacific Ocean under the command of William Bligh to acquire breadfruit plants and transport them to British possessions in the West Indies; that mission was never completed, due to a mutiny (1789) led by the acting Master, Fletcher Christian Click to show or hide the answer
Canadian submarine that suffered two fires while sailing from the Royal Navy base at Faslane, 2004, shortly after being handed over to Canada from Britain Click to show or hide the answer
Sank the General Belgrano (1982) – the only nuclear–powered submarine ever to sink an enemy warship Click to show or hide the answer
The US navy's most famous ship; launched 1797, the world's oldest fully commissioned vessel; dry–docked in Boston Harbour (where it's been, with some interruptions, since 1820) to promote the US Navy; nicknamed Old Ironsides Click to show or hide the answer
Crew members involved in the Iranian hostages incident, March 2007 Click to show or hide the answer
Royal Navy destroyer sunk by Argentinia's air force, 25 May 1982 (during the Falkland War – exactly 3 weeks after HMS Sheffield) Click to show or hide the answer
Ship that accompanied the Resolution on Captain Cook's third voyage Click to show or hide the answer
Launched in 1907 – the sixth Royal Navy ship with this name – then the world's most powerful warship; so advanced that the name became a generic term for modern battleships. Ironically saw little active service (was being refitted during of the Battle of Jutland); decommissioned in 1919 Click to show or hide the answer
The seventh ship with this name (1960–80) was the UK's first nuclear–powered submarine
Sunken British cruiser from which a large quantity of gold was recovered in 1981 Click to show or hide the answer
Captain Cook's ship on his first voyage; also the flagship of Australia's First Fleet Click to show or hide the answer
The two ships taken on Franklin's ill–fated 1845 expedition to find the North–West Passage; the first was found in 2014, the second in 2016 Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer
Survived Pearl Harbor (as USS Phoenix) but was sold to Argentina and sunk in the Falklands War; the first ship to be sunk in wartime by a nuclear–powered submarine; captain at the time of its sinking was Hector Bonzo Click to show or hide the answer
The first ironclad warship Click to show or hide the answer
US submarine that struck and sank a Japanese school training ship, 2001 Click to show or hide the answer
Cruiser with which Lord Kitchener went down (struck a mine off Orkney, 1916) Click to show or hide the answer
Name shared by the first submarines used respectively by both the US and Royal Navies (after their Irish–born US designer) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
In the Falklands campaign, Prince Andrew served on Click to show or hide the answer
Jellicoe's flagship at Jutland Click to show or hide the answer
Russian nuclear submarine, lost with all hands when it sank in the Barents Sea in 2000 Click to show or hide the answer
Admiral Beatty's flagship at Jutland – badly damaged, but saved and repaired Click to show or hide the answer
French–built frigate: launched in 1779, one of 16 ships handed over to the British Royal Navy at the Siege of Toulon in 1793, to prevent her from falling into the hands of the Republicans; sank in the West Frisian Islands (off the Dutch coast) in 1799, with a large cargo of gold; little of the gold was ever recovered, but the ship is famous for a bell that was salvaged Click to show or hide the answer
Blown up in Havana harbour, 1898, prompting a war between USA and Spain Click to show or hide the answer
Launched in 1510; flagship of successive admirals; rebuilt in 1528 and 1536; sank in the Solent in 1545 when sailing against a French invasion (possibly because the lower gun ports had been left open); refloated in 1982, now on view in Portsmouth Click to show or hide the answer
French frigate that ran aground off the north–west coast of Africa (modern Mauritania) in 1816, when on her way to re–establish the colony of Senegal; 147 of its passengers and crew were cast adrift on an open raft, only 15 of them surviving to be rescued 13 days later; the raft was the subject of a famous painting by Théodore Géricault Click to show or hide the answer
Admiral Byng was executed (1757) on board Click to show or hide the answer
The world's first nuclear–powered submarine (launched in 1954 by Mrs. Eisenhower); the first vessel to complete a submerged transit under the North Pole (1958) Click to show or hide the answer
Took Napoleon to exile on St. Helena, in 1815 Click to show or hide the answer
Royal Navy destroyer that grounded off a rock in a storm off Australia, 2002, and was carried back to Portsmouth on a "heavy lifting vessel" (barge) Click to show or hide the answer
First ship to bring the news of Nelson's victory at Trafalgar back to England Click to show or hide the answer
Vaporised by Britain's first atom bomb test (3 October 1952) Click to show or hide the answer
The second Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carrier, construction assured 2010, launch date etc. to be confirmed Click to show or hide the answer
US naval ship, captured by North Korean forces in January 1968 (during the Vietnam War) and accused of spying; one crew member was killed during the attack; the remaining 82 (including 6 officers) were released on 23 December 1968, after the US admitted that the ship had been spying; the US then immediately retracted its admission Click to show or hide the answer
Royal Navy aircraft carrier due to enter service in 2020 Click to show or hide the answer
French ship from which the musket ball that killed Nelson was said to have been fired Click to show or hide the answer
Captain Cook's ship on his second and third voyages Click to show or hide the answer
Appropriate name given to the ship of the line that brought King Charles II back to England upon the restoration of the monarchy Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Collingwood's flagship at Trafalgar Click to show or hide the answer
First British ship sunk in the Falklands conflict (hit by an Exocet missile 4 May 1982; foundered 6 days later) Click to show or hide the answer
Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) ship set on fire by Argentinian Air Force bombs, while waiting to unload troops on 8 June 1982; towed out to sea and sunk on 21 June; Simon Weston was a survivor Click to show or hide the answer
US destroyer hit by an Iraqi Exocet missile in 1987 (37 died) Click to show or hide the answer
Second in line behind HMS Victory at Trafalgar, when she played a significant role in the surrender of the French ship Redoutable – largely as a result of which she is remembered by the epithet 'Fighting'; featured in a famous painting by Turner, being "tugged to her final berth to be broken up" Click to show or hide the answer
Royal Navy submarine that sank on its trials in Liverpool Bay in 1939 Click to show or hide the answer
Launched in 1817, named after a battle that took place in 1782 off what is now Sri Lanka; remained in service, latterly for training and accommodation, until 1986; now (after restoration) in Hartlepool harbour, the centrepiece of a historic dockyard museum; the Royal Navy's oldest warship still afloat (Victory is in dry dock) Click to show or hide the answer
The last and biggest British battleship (decommissioned 1960) Click to show or hide the answer
Oldest ship currently on the British Naval List (in dry dock at Portsmouth) Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's first ironclad warship (the first armour clad warship with an iron hull) Click to show or hide the answer
British battleship that survived action in both world wars Click to show or hide the answer
Famous warship built for King Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden (named after the royal house); the master shipwright died during construction, after which the king asked for the length and height of the ship to be increased; sank on its maiden voyage in 1628; raised in 1961, now restored and on view in Stockholm Click to show or hide the answer
The world's largest battleships ever (both Japanese) – commissioned in 1941 & 1942, sunk in 1945 & 1944 Click to show or hide the answer

Miscellaneous

Cargo of the Bounty at the time of the mutiny Click to show or hide the answer
Captain of the Victory at Trafalgar Click to show or hide the answer
HMS Victory is now at Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017–18