Monkey

Quiz Monkey
What do you want to know?

You are here:

Language
Figures of Speech

If you like my website, and/or if you've found it useful, please consider making a small donation to my Just Giving page, which I've set up just for this purpose. To begin with I'm collecting for a charity whose work I have benefitted from myself (and continue to do so): the British Heart Foundation. It would be great to raise £100 in the first month.

If you have already donated ... Thank You!

Figures of Speech

An extended metaphor, in which a story is told to illustrate a point Click to show or hide the answer
A series of words that start with the same consonant, or sound alike Click to show or hide the answer
The juxtaposition of opposing or contrasting ideas, hence a complete opposite Click to show or hide the answer
Opposite meaning Click to show or hide the answer
A tersely phrased statement Click to show or hide the answer
Coincidence of sounds, vowel rhyme (e.g. mate, shape) Click to show or hide the answer
Misapplication of a word, especially in a mixed metaphor Click to show or hide the answer
Name for a person or thing associated with a place (e.g. cockney) Click to show or hide the answer
Joining together of two vowel sounds (as in join) Click to show or hide the answer
Suppression of a letter or syllable, in speech Click to show or hide the answer
Deliberate omission of one or more words (e.g. "I can do anything better than you") Click to show or hide the answer
Substitution of an offensive term by a more agreeable one Click to show or hide the answer
Same spelling, different meaning Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Same sound, different meaning, different spelling Click to show or hide the answer
Same sound, different meaning (spelling may be the same or different) Click to show or hide the answer
Deliberate use of exaggeration, for emphasis Click to show or hide the answer
Use of a hidden meaning Click to show or hide the answer
Use of language to convey a meaning opposite to the literal meaning of the words Click to show or hide the answer
Deliberate understatement, often by the use of a negated opposite (e.g. "not half") Click to show or hide the answer
Referring to something by means of the name of something intimately associated with it (e.g. "Westminster" for "Parliament") Click to show or hide the answer
Newly–created word Click to show or hide the answer
A statement that doesn't follow from what precedes it Click to show or hide the answer
A word that imitates the sound it describes Click to show or hide the answer
Juxtaposition of two apparently contradictory words (e.g. "deafening silence") Click to show or hide the answer
A statement or group of statements that leads to a counter–intuitive conclusion. (In literature, use of apparently contradictory ideas to point out an underlying truth) Click to show or hide the answer
Insertion of a phrase or clause in a place where it interrupts the flow of the sentence (often used to refer to the brackets that enclose it) Click to show or hide the answer
Use of superfluous or redundant words Click to show or hide the answer
Word combining the sound and meaning of two other words (Lewis Carroll) Click to show or hide the answer
Using a word or phrase in two different senses at the same time Click to show or hide the answer
Describes a question that doesn't expect an answer, but is asked in order to make a point Click to show or hide the answer
Use of irony, satire, ridicule, etc. to expose vice, folly, etc. Click to show or hide the answer
The way meaning is expressed in a language or code Click to show or hide the answer
Repetition of the "s" sound (a form of Alliteration) Click to show or hide the answer
Comparing two things for effect (e.g. "as white as snow") Click to show or hide the answer
Printer's mark: a Latin word, meaning 'let it stand' Click to show or hide the answer
The form of an adjective that indicates the most extreme meaning (e.g. best, latest) Click to show or hide the answer
Same meaning Click to show or hide the answer
(Rules that govern) the ways elements of a language are combined to convey meaning Click to show or hide the answer
Saying the same thing twice (e.g. "free gift") Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017