Monkey

Quiz Monkey
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Slang

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Bookies' Slang
Money
Other (1)
Other (2)

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Slang

See also Rhyming Slang (given its own page because there's so much of it!)

Bookies' Slang

Bottle Click to show or hide the answer
Carpet Click to show or hide the answer
Double carpet Click to show or hide the answer
Burlington Bertie Click to show or hide the answer
Bookies' signalling system Click to show or hide the answer

Money

USA: nickel Click to show or hide the answer
USA: dime Click to show or hide the answer
USA: two bits Click to show or hide the answer
Pavarotti Click to show or hide the answer
Pony Click to show or hide the answer
Monkey Click to show or hide the answer
Plum Click to show or hide the answer
Bernie (late 1990s) Click to show or hide the answer

US slang (late 19th century) for a dollar: used as the name of the unit of currency in video games The Simms and Sim City Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer

CB slang

CB radio was legalised in the UK in 1981 and it probably reached its peak popularity soon after that; but it is apparently still used, particularly by farmers, truckers and minicab drivers.

Meat wagon Click to show or hide the answer
Smokey, Bear, or Smokey Bear Click to show or hide the answer
10-4 Click to show or hide the answer
10-10 Click to show or hide the answer

Other (1)

In this section, the slang term is in the left–hand column (it's part of the question) and the meaning is on the right (it's the answer).

Speed, uppers, whizz, bennies (Benzedrine is a trade name for) Click to show or hide the answer
Mugging up (theatrical slang) Click to show or hide the answer
Strine Click to show or hide the answer
RAF slang: "Mickey Mouse" Click to show or hide the answer
Snow Click to show or hide the answer
Forces slang: "irons" Click to show or hide the answer
USA: G–man Click to show or hide the answer
Bridport dagger (after the place where they're made, a lot of the raw material being grown there) Click to show or hide the answer
Glasgow kiss Click to show or hide the answer
Mae West (US forces slang – particularly USAF) Click to show or hide the answer
Wampum (term used originally by Native Americans) Click to show or hide the answer
Trick cyclist: forces slang for a Click to show or hide the answer
Forces slang: "Tail'end Charlie" Click to show or hide the answer
Known in criminal slang as a peterman Click to show or hide the answer
Sawney: derogatory name for a Click to show or hide the answer
Referred to by surfers as "men in grey suits" Click to show or hide the answer
Jumbuck: Australian slang for a Click to show or hide the answer
USA: "(john) hancock" Click to show or hide the answer
Obtaining five finger discount Click to show or hide the answer
Pen & ink Click to show or hide the answer

Other (2)

Here, the slang term is in the right–hand column (it's the answer to the question) and the meaning is on the left.

Native of Barbados Click to show or hide the answer
Highly educated woman (after an informal women's social and educational movement, founded in England around 1750) Click to show or hide the answer
Slang term for a cowboy, from the Spanish word (vaquero) Click to show or hide the answer
Romany slang for someone who lives or behaves like a Gypsy but is not a true Romany Click to show or hide the answer
Cornish slang term for a tourist: a local dialect word, and also the heraldic term, for an ant Click to show or hide the answer
Term used in the 1920s for a young, unconventional woman – characterised by short skirts, bobbed hair, and a penchant for jazz Click to show or hide the answer
Originally an Irish outlaw Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017