Monkey

Quiz Monkey
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Games

On this page:

Backgammon
Bridge
Card Games
Cluedo
Dominoes
Draughts
Mahjong
Monopoly
Poker
Roulette
Scrabble
Solo Whist
Trivial Pursuit
Other games
Which game?

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Games

See also Chess, Video Games.

Backgammon

Number of stones each player has at the start of a game Click to show or hide the answer
Highest number on the doubling die Click to show or hide the answer
Name given to the biggest possible win Click to show or hide the answer
Single counter on a row Click to show or hide the answer
Central division of the board Click to show or hide the answer

Bridge

Bridge is believed to have originated among the Russian community in Istanbul, as a development of whist, towards the end of the 19th century. The name comes from biritch, which is a Russian or Slavic word for the herald of a prince or nobleman.

Number of games in a rubber Click to show or hide the answer
Number of tricks to make a contract, in addition to the number bid Click to show or hide the answer
Thus, for example, number of tricks required to make a contract of 1 No Trump Click to show or hide the answer
Tricks in a little slam Click to show or hide the answer
Tricks in a grand slam Click to show or hide the answer
Hand containing no trumps Click to show or hide the answer
Player who reveals his or her hand and sits out the game Click to show or hide the answer
Hand containing nothing higher than a 9 Click to show or hide the answer

Order of the suits (lowest first):

Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

The lowest bid Click to show or hide the answer
Next lowest bid, after one spade Click to show or hide the answer
Next lowest bid, after one no trump Click to show or hide the answer
Lowest (undoubled) game hand Click to show or hide the answer

Chancellor of the Exchequer 1970, helped to invent the ACOL bidding system Click to show or hide the answer

Card Games

See also Bridge, Poker, Solo Whist.

King shown in profile (traditionally) – thus having 'only one eye' Click to show or hide the answer
King with no moustache Click to show or hide the answer
One–eyed Jacks Click to show or hide the answer
Two–eyed Jacks Click to show or hide the answer
Each Queen holds a Click to show or hide the answer
'The Black Lady' Click to show or hide the answer
'The curse of Scotland' Click to show or hide the answer
'The devil's bedpost' Click to show or hide the answer
Diamonds in a pack Click to show or hide the answer
Chemin de Fer is a variety of Click to show or hide the answer
Baccarat: best possible score Click to show or hide the answer
Game named after the Spanish word for a basket Click to show or hide the answer
Said (by John Aubrey, author of Brief Lives) to have been invented by Sir John Suckling, poet at Charles I's court; the term 'to peg out' originates in Click to show or hide the answer
Canasta: number of cards used (two packs, including Jokers) Click to show or hide the answer
Canasta: wild cards – Jokers and Click to show or hide the answer
Cribbage: number of points to 'peg out' (i.e. win – in a full game) Click to show or hide the answer
Cribbage: the best possible score (three 5s, J of the fourth suit; fourth 5 turned up. 12 for 4 of a kind; 16 for eight 15s, one for his nob) Click to show or hide the answer
Cribbage: the only score below 24 that it's impossible to get (hence a hand that scores zero is popularly known as a "nineteen hand") Click to show or hide the answer
Gin rummy: number of cards dealt to each player Click to show or hide the answer
Term used in games of the rummy family (including canasta), and also in Mah Jong, to denote a completed set of cards or tiles Click to show or hide the answer
Hearts: used (by Microsoft) to describe when a player wins all the penalty cards in a hand – thus scoring no points (a good thing), and inflicting a penalty on every other player (26 in the Microsoft version) Click to show or hide the answer
Miss Milligan is a type of Click to show or hide the answer
Piquet (or bezique): number of cards used Click to show or hide the answer

Cluedo

Number of suspects – also the number of possible murder weapons Click to show or hide the answer

The six original suspects were:

Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

Miss White was replaced in 2016 by Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer

The six potential murder weapons are:

Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

Number of rooms in which the murder can take place Click to show or hide the answer
Number of possible solutions to the murder (6 * 6 * 9) Click to show or hide the answer
Name of the house Click to show or hide the answer
Owner of Tudor Close and victim of the murder Click to show or hide the answer

Dominoes

Dominoes in a set Click to show or hide the answer
Spots on a set of (double six) dominoes Click to show or hide the answer

Draughts

Squares on the board Click to show or hide the answer
Pieces at the start of a game Click to show or hide the answer
Possible opening moves for the first player (white) Click to show or hide the answer
Dominated draughts from 1955 until his death in 1995 Click to show or hide the answer

Mahjong

The first thing to say about Mahjong is that there are lots of different ways of spelling it. Is it Mah Jong, Mah Jongg, or Mahjong? Wikipedia currently prefers Mahjong, so I'm going along with that.

The next thing is the total number of tiles in a set:

Number of tiles in a mahjong set (standard westernised version – including winds, dragons, flowers and seasons) Click to show or hide the answer

I'm now going to attempt to categorise them.

Suits

108 of the tiles are suit tiles. There are three suits, nine tiles in each suit, and there are four of each tile. 3 x 9 x 4 = 108.

The three suits go under various names:

Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer

Honours

There are two sets of honours tiles: winds and dragons. There are four winds and three dragons. There are four tiles of each honour; that's 16 winds and 12 dragons, altogether.

No prizes for guessing what the four winds are (but they are traditionally listed in a different order from the one we're familiar with in the West):

Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

You'll notice that they're listed clockwise from 3 o'clock.

The three dragons are:

Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

There are several national flags that you might use to remember the colours of the dragons. You might think of the Italian flag, or the Mexican one; but best of all may be the Welsh flag, which has the right colours and has a dragon on it.

The order in which the dragons are invariably listed is of course different from the order in which they appear on the Italian and Mexican flags … but I'm not aware that it's in any way significant. For what it's worth, the order is actually alphabetical.

Bonus tiles

There are two sets of bonus tiles: flowers and seasons. There are four flowers and four seasons. Each flower, and each season, is associated with one of the winds:

Wind Flower Season
Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

Notice that the seasons are in the order that they actually come round, starting with Spring. This might explain why the East wind is always listed first: because it's associated with Spring, which is in so many ways the first season of the year.

Summary

Suits Circles Click to show or hide the answer
Bamboos Click to show or hide the answer
Characters Click to show or hide the answer
Honours Winds Click to show or hide the answer
Dragons Click to show or hide the answer
Bonus Flowers Click to show or hide the answer
Seasons Click to show or hide the answer
Total Click to show or hide the answer

Monopoly

Except where otherwise stated, this section is about the standard British edition of Monopoly.

It's a sure sign that the question setter is running short on inspiration, but sooner or later you're going to get asked about the squares on the Monopoly board. For example: "What's the third property in the pale blue set, after The Angel Islington and Euston Road?" If he or she is really desperate, you might even get asked about the costs of the properties. The following table should help:

Brown Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Pale blue Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Pink Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Orange Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Red Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Yellow Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Green Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Dark blue Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer  

In order to save space, I've only given one price per set. This is the cost of the first property in the set. Notice that it goes up by £40 in each set (except for the last, most expensive set). The second property in the set is always the same price as the first - except in the last (dark blue) set, where Mayfair costs £400 (£50 more than Park Lane). In the three-property sets, the cost of the last property is always £20 more than the cost of the other two.

The mortgage value of each property - including the utilities and the railway stations (see below) - is half its cost.

The cost of houses is £50 on the first side of the board (the brown and pale blue sets), £100 on the second side (pink and orange), £150 on the third side (red and yellow) and £200 on the fourth side. The cost of a hotel is, in each case, the cost of a house plus four houses. For example: on Old Kent Road a hotel costs £50 plus four houses; on Mayfair, a hotel costs £200 plus four houses.

I was once asked what the rent was on Old Kent Road (site only). I don't think I've ever been asked about the rent on any other property, and I hope I never will be.  But for the record, I've given the rents for Old Kent Road and Mayfair - site only and with a hotel, in each case - in the table below. For the ones in between (and for the rents with 1, 2, 3 or 4 houses) there is no recognisable system - and hopefully no one would expect you to carry all 132 figures (six for each of 22 properties) around in your head.

And apropos of nothing, the biggest percentage jump in rent is when you add a third house - ranging from 200% on Old Kent Road (£30 to £90), and indeed on any of the first seven properties (£150 to £450 on Pall Mall and Whitehall) down to 133% on Mayfair (£600 to £1,400).

Each player starts with Click to show or hide the answer
The bank note with the highest value Click to show or hide the answer
Cost of a house on Old Kent Road Click to show or hide the answer
Cost of a house on Mayfair Click to show or hide the answer
Cost of the stations (each) Click to show or hide the answer
Cost of the utilities (Water and Electric companies – each) Click to show or hide the answer
The number of properties that you can build houses on Click to show or hide the answer

There are six sets of three properties and two sets of two (not counting the stations and utilities, of course).

The first property you can land on, and the only one you can build houses on that's south of the Thames Click to show or hide the answer
Property named after the inn where the compilers of the British version of the game had lunch while researching locations in London Click to show or hide the answer
Diagonally opposite to Go Click to show or hide the answer

Jail is between Click to show or hide the answer
Free Parking is between Click to show or hide the answer
"Go to Jail" is between Click to show or hide the answer

Income Tax (between Whitechapel Road and Kings Cross Station) Click to show or hide the answer
Super Tax (between Park Lane and Mayfair) Click to show or hide the answer
Rent on Old Kent Roat (site only) Click to show or hide the answer
Rent on Old Kent Road (with a hotel) Click to show or hide the answer
Rent on Mayfair (site only) Click to show or hide the answer
Rent on Mayfair (with a hotel) Click to show or hide the answer

Rent on a utility – if the landlord only owns one Click to show or hide the answer
Rent on a utility – if the landlord owns both Click to show or hide the answer

The four stations, in order around the board (starting from Go) are:

Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

The rent on a station is £25 if the landlord only owns one station, doubling up with every additional station to £200 if he or she owns all four (£50 if two are owned, £100 if three).

The following tables show the penalties or rewards detailed on the Chance and Community Chest cards, respectively – from the most expensive to the most rewarding, in each case:

Chance

If elected Chairman of the Board, you must pay each player Click to show or hide the answer
Cost of repairs to a hotel Click to show or hide the answer
Cost of repairs to a house Click to show or hide the answer
Poor tax Click to show or hide the answer
Bank dividend Click to show or hide the answer
If your building loan matures, you receive Click to show or hide the answer

Community Chest

School fees Click to show or hide the answer
Cost of repairs to a hotel Click to show or hide the answer
Hospital fees Click to show or hide the answer
Doctor's fee Click to show or hide the answer
Insurance premium Click to show or hide the answer
Cost of repairs to a house Click to show or hide the answer
Prize for coming second in a beauty contest Click to show or hide the answer
Income tax refund Click to show or hide the answer
Amount you might receive "for services" Click to show or hide the answer
Proceeds from sale of stock Click to show or hide the answer
The amount you might inherit Click to show or hide the answer
If your Christmas fund matures, you receive Click to show or hide the answer
If there's a bank error in your favour, you receive Click to show or hide the answer
Amount you collect from each player for the opening night of your opera Click to show or hide the answer

The American version of Monopoly is set in (resort city in New Jersey – known for its casinos, boardwalk and beach) Click to show or hide the answer

Properties that are the same on British and American versions Click to show or hide the answer

Poker

Initial stake in each hand Click to show or hide the answer
Stud poker: how many cards are dealt face down (to each player)? Click to show or hide the answer
Hand with all cards of the same suit Click to show or hide the answer
The best possible hand (A, K, Q, J and 10 of the same suit) Click to show or hide the answer
Second best possible hand: any five consecutive cards in the same suit, but no ace Click to show or hide the answer
2 black Aces, 2 black 8s, Queen of Hearts (as held by Wild Bill Hickok when shot) Click to show or hide the answer
Lowest 'combination' hand Click to show or hide the answer
Hand with three cards of one value and two of another (e.g. 3 Kings, 2 Aces) Click to show or hide the answer
Nicknames, in Texas Hold 'Em (where each player gets two cards face down, and five 'community cards' are dealt face up), include: Big Slick, Space Cowboy, Walking Back to Houston, Big Ugly, Santa Barabara, Ass Kicker, Machine Gun, and Big Slick in a Suit (if suited) Click to show or hide the answer
Given as a trophy to the winner of a World Series of Poker tournament Click to show or hide the answer

Roulette

Highest number on the wheel Click to show or hide the answer
Numbers on a European wheel (including French and British) Click to show or hide the answer
Numbers on an American wheel Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Total of all the numbers on a roulette wheel (1–36) Click to show or hide the answer
Numbers 1–18 Click to show or hide the answer
Numbers 19–36 Click to show or hide the answer
(Background) colour of the zero on the wheel – and the double zero on an American wheel (others are red or black) Click to show or hide the answer

Scrabble

These notes refer to the English edition of Scrabble. Other editions may differ.

Manufacturer (in the UK) Click to show or hide the answer
Squares on a Scrabble board Click to show or hide the answer
Number of Triple Word squares Click to show or hide the answer
Number of Double Word squares (including the centre square) Click to show or hide the answer
Number of Triple Letter squares Click to show or hide the answer
Number of Double Letter squares Click to show or hide the answer
Colour of the Triple Word squares Click to show or hide the answer
Colour of the Double Word squares Click to show or hide the answer
Colour of the Triple Letter squares Click to show or hide the answer
Colour of the Double Letter squares Click to show or hide the answer
Number of tiles each player has at the start of each turn (until they start to run out) Click to show or hide the answer
Bonus points for using all seven tiles Click to show or hide the answer
The two letters that score 10 Click to show or hide the answer
The two letters that score 8 Click to show or hide the answer
The only letter that scores 5 Click to show or hide the answer
The five letters that score 4 Click to show or hide the answer
The four letters that score 3 Click to show or hide the answer
The two letters that score 2 Click to show or hide the answer
The five consonants that score 1 Click to show or hide the answer
Number of tiles (including the two blanks) Click to show or hide the answer

Letter distribution:

EA IO NR TD LS UG BC FH MP VW YJ KQ XZ
129 98 66 64 44 43 22 22 22 22 21 11 11

Solo Whist (a.k.a. Solo)

Solo: number of tricks you undertake to make, if you bid solo Click to show or hide the answer
Bid where two players undertake to win 8 tricks between them Click to show or hide the answer
Bid that undertakes to make 9 tricks, choosing trumps Click to show or hide the answer
Bid that undertakes to make 9 tricks without changing trumps Click to show or hide the answer
Bid that undertakes to make all 13 tricks Click to show or hide the answer
Bid that undertakes to make no tricks Click to show or hide the answer
Bid that undertakes to make no tricks, with the bidder's cards placed face up on the table after the first trick is complete Click to show or hide the answer

Trivial Pursuit

The categories in the original (Genus) edition of Trivial Pursuit – and also in the Genus II edition – were:

Blue Click to show or hide the answer
Pink Click to show or hide the answer
Yellow Click to show or hide the answer
Brown Click to show or hide the answer
Green Click to show or hide the answer
Orange Click to show or hide the answer

Other games

Go: name of the computer program that, in 2016, became the first to beat a 9-dan professional in a five–game match (having previously become the first to beat a professional human player without handicaps on a full–sized 19 x 19 board) Click to show or hide the answer
Hopscotch: the 'scotch' refers to the Click to show or hide the answer
Petanque: cochonnet is the French term for the Click to show or hide the answer
Shove ha'penny: number of beds on the board Click to show or hide the answer
Snakes & Ladders: number of squares on a standard board Click to show or hide the answer
Table football: team formation Defence (full-backs) Click to show or hide the answer
Midfield (half-backs) Click to show or hide the answer
Strikers (forwards) Click to show or hide the answer

Which game?

US variant of backgammon, where a throw of 2 and 1 gives the player extra benefits (there is also a card game with more or less the same name) Click to show or hide the answer
Card game, for two or three players or two partnerships: the object is to win special scoring values for the highest trump, the lowest trump, the jack, the ace, the ten, and the face cards; a.k.a. high–low–jack, old sledge, pitch, seven–up Click to show or hide the answer
Doubling cube: used in Click to show or hide the answer
Keno is a modern US version (played in casinos) of Click to show or hide the answer
Collective name used in France for games played with metal balls, including pétanque Click to show or hide the answer
The Bermuda Bowl is a biennial world championship tournament in Click to show or hide the answer
The Howell Movement and the Mitchell Movement are used in Click to show or hide the answer
Board game, with video spin–offs, named after a fortified mediaeval city in southern France Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional children's game involving looping string around the fingers Click to show or hide the answer
Ruy Lopez is a strategy used in Click to show or hide the answer
The Elo system is used to rate players in various games and some team sports, but it was invented for
A "patzer" is an inexperienced or poor player in
Shogi is a Japanese version of
Game for up to six players: the object is to move each of 10 marbles to the opposite point of a six–pointed star; invented in Germany in 1893 – name is of US origin Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Card game – a variety of all fours – in which the five of trumps ranks highest; name (possibly from the Spanish word for "five") also means an easy task, or a strong girth for a saddle Click to show or hide the answer
First appeared (in its modern format) in the New York World in 1913 – compiled by Arthur Wynn, a journalist from Liverpool Click to show or hide the answer
Variously known as African Dominoes or The Devil's Bones Click to show or hide the answer
Name said to derive from Venetian carnival masks (white with black spots), which in turn are named after the hoods worn in winter by French priests; comes ultimately from the Latin for "lord" or "master"; varieties include Blind Hughie, Honest John, Sebastopol, Into the Woods, Fives and Threes, All Fives, and Block Click to show or hide the answer
The game of skimming stones is also known as Click to show or hide the answer
Ancient board game of Chinese origin (also popular in Korea and Japan for around 1500 years); played on a grid of black lines (typically 19 x 19), players place stones on the intersections and attempt to surround each other's stones Click to show or hide the answer
Known as laylay in Iran, kith–kith in India, amarelinha in Brazil, peevers in Glasgow, potsy in New York Click to show or hide the answer
Japanese name for a US–originated puzzle, played on a grid similar to a crossword, where the numbers in each set of squares must add up to a specified total – originally known as Cross Sums Click to show or hide the answer
Name is Latin for 'I play'; derived from the ancient Indian game of pachisi, known as 'the royal game of India'; a similar game called Parcheesi is marketed in the USA Click to show or hide the answer
Also known as the Game of the Four Winds; name means 'sparrows' Click to show or hide the answer
Invented by Charles Darrow in 1934 Click to show or hide the answer
Its mascot was originally known as Rich Uncle Pennybags – possibly based on the influential US financier and banker J. P. Morgan (1837–1913) – officially renamed (after the game itself) in 1999
Reputedly banned by Fidel Castro in Cuba, and in the Soviet Union Click for more information
Manufactured since 1973, originally in Japan: based on Reversi, which was popular in the late 19th century; also has a lot in common with the traditional Japanese game Go Click to show or hide the answer
Precursor of croquet – popular in the 16th and 17th centuries – with two iron arches, one at either end of the playing area (alley), through which players hit a wooden ball by using a mallet. Gave its name to a famous London thoroughfare (there are various other spellings); mentioned in Pepys's diary and Johnson's dictionary Click to show or hide the answer
Introduced to Britain 1876 by the US ambassador, Robert C. Schenck; stud, draw and community card are the three main varieties of; Texas hold 'em is a further variant (of community card) Click to show or hide the answer
8–ball and Straight are forms of Click to show or hide the answer
The foot spot, the head spot and the scratch line are found on a Click to show or hide the answer
Word puzzle using pictures or letters to represent words – gave its name to Ian Rankin's Edinburgh–based fictional police inspector Click to show or hide the answer
Strategy board game: introduced in 1957, and originally marketed in the UK by Waddington's; involves a political map of the world, divided into six continents and 42 territories; players attempt to take over all 42 Click to show or hide the answer
Name is French for "little wheel" Click to show or hide the answer
Invented by Alfred Butts (died 1993), who named it Criss Cross Words; he sold it to entrepreneur James Brunot, who gave it the name by which it became famous, patenting it in 1948 Click to show or hide the answer
Double Dutch and Dipsy Doodles are terms used in Click to show or hide the answer
Name is Latin for the hobby (bird of prey) Click to show or hide the answer
Puzzle invented in New York, 1979, as "Number Place"; published in Japan 1983, and in the UK twenty years later Click to show or hide the answer
Puzzle made by cutting a square into 5 triangles, a square and a lozenge Click to show or hide the answer
Squidger is a piece of equipment, and Boondock and Squop are types of shot, in Click to show or hide the answer
Children's card game, introduced in 1968 and relaunched in 1997: each card represents a different example of a particular type of entity (e.g. cars, aircraft, boats, dinosaurs, or characters from a popular film or television series) – typically 30 cards per pack; contestants try to win each others' cards by comparing the values of different characteristics, given on the cards Click to show or hide the answer
Invented by Canadians Scott Abbott and Chris Haney Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017