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Gardens and Gardeners

People

Lincolnshire–born botanist who named Botany Bay after going there with Captain Cook in 1771; largely responsible for establishing Kew Gardens Click to show or hide the answer
First Director–General of the Royal Horticultural Society; editor of its Gardeners' Encyclopedia of Plants and Flowers; retired 1993 Click to show or hide the answer
Naturalist in the Garden (RHS magazine), Nature Notes (Daily Telegraph) Click to show or hide the answer
Botanist and designer, best known for creating a garden near Elmstead Market, Essex Click to show or hide the answer
Conifer Abies forrestii: named after Click to show or hide the answer
17th century Scottish botanist, gave his name to a shrub that bears yellow bell–shaped flowers in early Spring Click to show or hide the answer
BBC TV Gardeners' World: main presenter Click to show or hide the answer
English botanist, discovered many species in Antarctica; succeeded his father as Director of Kew Gardens, 1865 Click to show or hide the answer
Founder of the Garden History Society (1964) Click to show or hide the answer
British property developer (1829–1904): developed Merton Park (now in the London Borough of Merton) as a garden suburb; endowed a horticultural institute, which still bears his name; but his name is best known through a formula for compost, developed at the institute in the 1930s and released into the public domain Click to show or hide the answer
Famous artist and gardener: created numerous landscapes for the works of the architect Edwin Lutyens; he designed her home at Munstead Wood, near Godalming in Surrey, and together they were highly influential in the Arts and Crafts movement Click to show or hide the answer
Presenter of BBC's Gardeners' Question Time – retired in 1993 Click to show or hide the answer
Derby, 1839: one of the first public parks in the West, created by Click to show or hide the answer
Victorian traveller and amateur botanist who donated her botanical paintings, and a gallery to put them in, to Kew Gardens Click to show or hide the answer
Gardens at Sissinghurst Castle (near Tunbridge Wells, Kent): created by Click to show or hide the answer
Cultivated the Cavendish banana – which accounts for the vast majority of bananas consumed in the western world – while working as head gardener at Chatsworth House in Derbyshire (seat of the Dukes of Devonshire, family name Cavendish) in the 1820s and 1830s Click to show or hide the answer
Masterminded the restoration of the Lost Gardens of Heligan and the Eden Project Click to show or hide the answer
Name shared by a father and son: the father (c. 1570–1638) was head gardener to the Earls of Salisbury and Duke of Buckingham; his son (1608–62) succeeded him as head gardener to Charles I and Queen Henrietta Maria; they introduced many plants that are now garden staples, including a genus that is named after them; commemorated by a gravestone in the churchyard of St–Mary–at–Lambeth, which is now the Museum of Gardening History Click to show or hide the answer
East End doctor who invented a plant transporting case named after him Click to show or hide the answer
Nickname of plant finder Ernest Wilson (collected over 65,000 specimens on his expeditions to Asia) Click to show or hide the answer

Other

Horticultural Society of London became Royal Horticultural Society Click to show or hide the answer
RHS Dictionary of Gardening: first published Click to show or hide the answer
Sir Harold Hiller's world–famous gardens and arboretum Click to show or hide the answer
Great Stove – built 1836–40 by Sir Joseph Paxton – covered an acre; then the World's largest building Click to show or hide the answer
1994: BBC Gardeners' Question Time team defected to Click to show or hide the answer
Black Hamburgh grapevine – planted by Capability Brown Click to show or hide the answer
Pagoda built for Princess Augusta in the 1760s Click to show or hide the answer
Rose named after the Gloucestershire garden started in the 1920s by Heather Muir Click to show or hide the answer
Kew Gardens: official name Click to show or hide the answer
Chelsea Flower Show: organised by the Click to show or hide the answer
Landscape gardens started in 1741 by banker Henry Hoare who dammed a river to form a lake Click to show or hide the answer
National Trust property in Cheshire, venue of an annual flower show held by the RHS in July Click to show or hide the answer
Savill Garden – named by George VI after deputy ranger Sir Eric Savill Click to show or hide the answer
Annual book listing gardens open to the public in aid of charity Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017