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Mythology
Miscellaneous

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Robin Hood
Other

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Myths, Legends and Beliefs: Miscellaneous

Robin Hood

The name of Robin's sword (in Robin of Sherwood, the 1980s ITV series starring Alan Praed as Robin) Click to show or hide the answer
First appears in the legends as a hired killer, who attempts to kill Robin but ends up being killed by him; in later stories he's a rival to Robin for the love of Maid Marian Click to show or hide the answer
(According to legend) Robin Hood was the rightful Earl of Click to show or hide the answer
English king of whom Robin is seen, in popular culture, as a supporter (having been driven to outlawry by his brother and regent, Prince John) Click to show or hide the answer
Joins the Merry Men after fighting Robin with quarterstaves over a river (according to later stories); buried, according to local tradition, in the Derbyshire village of Hathersage Click to show or hide the answer
Wandering minstrel who became a member of Robin's "Merry Men" Click to show or hide the answer
Youngest of the Merry Men (according to later stories) Click to show or hide the answer
Robin's nephew, and one of the Merry Men – noted for hiis skilful swordsmanship Click to show or hide the answer

Other

Believed in Ireland to wail to foretell a death Click to show or hide the answer
Monstrous black dog of legend in the North of England – particularly Yorkshire Click to show or hide the answer
Hero from Geatland in Sweden, of an Old English epic poem, dating from 800–1000 AD; slew the demon monster Grendel (and Grendel's mother) with his sword Hrunting Click to show or hide the answer
Ape–like creature believed by some to inhabit forested areas of the Pacific northwest United States and British Columbia Click to show or hide the answer
Irish artefact, kissing which is believed to bestow "the gift of the gab" Click to show or hide the answer
Buried under King's Cross Station, according to a popular urban myth (which places this as the site of her last battle and therefore her death and burial) Click to show or hide the answer
Dick Whittington was persuaded to return to London, after failing to make his fortune at the first attempt, by Click to show or hide the answer
Legendary queen, in the German legend of the Niebelungen, won for King Gunther by the magic of Siegfried Click to show or hide the answer
Mythical creature of Australian Aboriginal culture, said to live in swamps and other watery places, and to be part emu, part crocodile Click to show or hide the answer
Mythical beasts that guarded Burmese temples Click to show or hide the answer
Blood–sucking creature of urban myth, in widely–spread parts of the Americas: name means 'goat–sucker'; earliest reports originated in Puerto Rico in 1995; more recent sightings have ranged from Maine to Chile Click to show or hide the answer
Father figure and protector of the tribe, in Irish mythology: associated with a magic club and a bottomless cauldron Click to show or hide the answer
Tragic heroine of Irish legend: fell in love with the handsome warrior Naoise, but was forced to marry King Conchobar of Ulster; dashed herself to pieces against a rock, rather than go to live with the man who had killed Naoise on Conchobar's orders Click to show or hide the answer
Name given by the Australian aborigines to the timeless past wherein their legends are set Click to show or hide the answer
Legendary city of gold that inspired the Conquistadors, and also Walter Raleigh Click to show or hide the answer
Classic German legend about a successful scholar who sells his soul to the devil in return for unlimited knowledge and worldly pleasures. Inspired plays by Marlowe (c. 1592) and Goethe (1806–8); name derived from the Latin, meaning "auspicious" or "lucky" Click to show or hide the answer
Irish giant who built the Giant's Causeway, in order to walk to Scotland and fight his rival Benandonner – who tore the bridge down – known in Scots Gallic as Fingal Click to show or hide the answer
Phantom ship of maritime legend, doomed to sail the seas forever in search of Table Bay; said to haunt the seas around the Cape of Good Hope; inspired an opera by Wagner, premièred on 2 January 1843, which is actually set on the North Sea Click to show or hide the answer
Twin giants, traditionally the guardians of the City of London; said to be two of a race of giants that once occupied Britain; names originate in the Bible – also mentioned in the Koran, and feature widely in the mythology and folklore of many cultures Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Man–made humanoid creature of Jewish folklore Click to show or hide the answer
Mythical mischievous creature that damages machinery, especially aeroplane engines Click to show or hide the answer
Mythical beast with a lion's body, eagle's head and wings (most common in the art and lore of Ancient Greece, but also represented in Ancient Persian and Egyptian art dating back to before 3000 BC) Click to show or hide the answer
Voodoo, and the associated Zombie legend, originated (among African–born slaves) in Click to show or hide the answer
Scottish folklore: a kelpie is a ghost in the form of a Click to show or hide the answer
Irish princess, in mediaeval legend: married to Mark, King of Cornwall, but fell in love with his knight Tristan Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Legendary founder and first emperor of Japan (7th century BC) Click to show or hide the answer
Divine wind, sent to destroy the Mongol fleet, in Samurai myth Click to show or hide the answer
Legendary sea monster believed to have lived off the coasts of Norway and Iceland – possibly originated in sightings of giant squid Click to show or hide the answer
Fearsome dragon that, according to legend, terrorised part of Co. Durham in the time of the Crusades: named after the local landowning family (antecedents of the Earls of Durham), one of whom is the protagonist of the legend Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Arctic rodent, popularly (but wrongly) believed to commit mass suicide Click to show or hide the answer
The 'Surgeon's Photograph', taken in 1934, claimed to depict Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
River nymph of the Rhine – sits on a rock combing her hair, and lures sailors to their doom by her singing Click to show or hide the answer
Marine mammal said to be the origin of mermaid legends Click to show or hide the answer
Plant of the nightshade family, perceived to resemble the shape of the human body and used in magic and witchcraft; said to shriek in pain when pulled from the ground Click to show or hide the answer
Patron god of the ancient city of Babylon Click to show or hide the answer
Snow White: the occupation of the dwarfs Click to show or hide the answer
Scots author and narrator of a cycle of poems (probably of Irish origin) which James Macpherson (1736–96) claimed to have translated from the Gallic – son of Fionn mac Cumhaill (Finn MacCool, or Fingal) Click to show or hide the answer
"Legendary" character of the Old West, invented 1916 by Edward O'Reilly; feats included digging the Rio Grande and painting the Painted Desert Click to show or hide the answer
Nickname given to the only person, according to tradition, who looked at Lady Godiva as she rode naked through the streets of Coventry Click to show or hide the answer
Substance sought (in vain) by mediaeval alchemists in the belief that it could turn base metal into gold Click to show or hide the answer
Fire–like element postulated in the 17th century as being contained in all combustible substances and released when they burned (first suggested by Joachim Becher 1667) Click to show or hide the answer
Legendary bird that lives for up to 1,000 years, then builds a nest in which it burns, then is reborn from the ashes as an egg Click to show or hide the answer
Christian patriarch and king, said to rule over a Christian nation lost amidst the Muslims and pagans of the Orient during the Middle Ages (12th –17th centuries). Said to be a descendant of one of the three Magi Click to show or hide the answer
The plumed or feathered serpent of Aztec and Toltec mythology – god of wind and learning; name literally means "feathered serpent" Click to show or hide the answer
Enormous bird of prey, in Arabian and Persian legend: could lift an elephant, destroyed Sinbad the Sailor's ship (in the Arabian Nights) Click to show or hide the answer
Celtic festival to mark the end of the harvest, said to be a precursor of Halloween Click to show or hide the answer
Alternative name for Bigfoot Click to show or hide the answer
Mythical princess who saved her life and those of other women by telling the 1,001 stories of the Arabian Nights Click to show or hide the answer
Sea spirit in the form of a seal, which can come ashore and take human form (Scotland) Click to show or hide the answer
A werewolf can only be killed with a dagger or bullet made from a Click to show or hide the answer
10th century Abbot of Glastonbury and Archbishop of Canterbury, said to have held the Devil's nose in a pair of red hot tongs Click to show or hide the answer
Semi–legendary Swiss archer of the 14th century: sentenced to shoot an apple from the head of his son Walter, for refusing to salute the Habsburg badge at his home town of Altdorf (on Lake Luzern); later shot the tyrannical Austrian ruler (Vogt) Gessler Click to show or hide the answer
London barber, provided fillings for Mrs. Lovett's pies (sometimes claimed to be based on historical fact, but there is no evidence) Click to show or hide the answer
Celtic 'Land of Youth' Click to show or hide the answer
Commonly seen, in Mediaeval legend, as a symbol of purity and virtue, which can only be captured (according to Guillaume of Normandy in the 13th Century) by a virgin Click to show or hide the answer
Dragon–like creature of mediaeval legend, frequently used in British heraldry and popular even today for use in company logos; gave its name to a car (Vauxhall) and a strike aircraft (Westland) in the 1950s Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2018