Monkey

Quiz Monkey
What do you want to know?

You are here:

Religion
The Clergy

On this page:

Archbishops of Canterbury
Popes
Other

If you like my website, and/or if you've found it useful, please consider making a small donation to my Just Giving page, which I've set up just for this purpose. To begin with I'm collecting for a charity whose work I have benefitted from myself (and continue to do so): the British Heart Foundation. It would be great to raise £100 in the first month.

If you have already donated ... Thank You!

The Clergy

... and other religious people (including saints, etc.)

Archbishops of Canterbury (recent–ish)

1928–42: in office at the time of the abdication crisis Click to show or hide the answer
1942–4 Click to show or hide the answer
1945–61: married Princess Elizabeth and Prince Philip; crowned Elizabeth II; the first to visit the Pope for 600 years Click to show or hide the answer
1961–74: the 100th Archbishop of Canterbury Click to show or hide the answer
1974–80 Click to show or hide the answer
1980–90: married Charles and Diana; Terry Waite – captured in Beirut 1987 – was his Special Envoy Click to show or hide the answer
1991–2002 Click to show or hide the answer
2002–12 Click to show or hide the answer
2013–: previously (2011–13) Bishop of Durham Click to show or hide the answer

Popes (similarly recent–ish)

Years Real name
1939–58 Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli Click to show or hide the answer
1958–63 Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli Click to show or hide the answer
1963–78 Giovanni Batista Enrico Antonio Maria Montini Click to show or hide the answer
Aug–Sep 1978 Albino Luciani Click to show or hide the answer
1978–2005 Karol Josef Wojtyla Click to show or hide the answer
2005–13 Joseph Aloysius Ratzinger Click to show or hide the answer
2013– Jorge Mario Bergoglio Click to show or hide the answer

Others

The most common papal name (see above) Click to show or hide the answer

The only English (or British) Pope (1154–9, real name Nicholas Breakspear) Click to show or hide the answer
The last non–Italian Pope, before John Paul II (1522–3; real name Adriaan Florenszoon Boeyens, he came from Utrecht which is in the Netherlands) Click to show or hide the answer
Italian Dominican friar, one of the Catholic Church's greatest theologians and philosophers (1225–74); canonised in 1323; also known as the Angelic Doctor; nicknamed 'the Dumb Ox' by his fellow–students (in Cologne), who thought him slow because he didn't say much; known by the name of the county in present–day Lazio where his family held land until 1137 Click to show or hide the answer
Founder of the monastery on Lindisfarne (635 AD) Click to show or hide the answer
The first British (English) martyr Click to show or hide the answer
Said to have been crucified on a diagonal cross Click to show or hide the answer
The first Archbishop of Canterbury Click to show or hide the answer
English theologian and historian, c. 673–735: entered Monkwearmouth Monastery at age 7, becoming a priest at Jarrow in 703; the only native of Great Britain to be given the title Doctor of the Church; a skilled linguist and translator, making the Latin and Greek writings of the early Church Fathers much more accessible to his fellow Anglo–Saxons Click to show or hide the answer
Founder of the monastery at Monte Cassino (529 AD); one of three patron saints of Europe declared by Pope John Paul II in 1980 Click to show or hide the answer
Papal name of Theophylactus of Tusculum (c. 1012 to c. 1056) – one of the youngest popes in history (aged approximately 20 at his first election); the only man to have been Pope on more than one occasion, and the only man ever to have sold the papacy Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
The first reigning Pope to make a state visit to Britain (2010) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
The first Pope to renunciate (resign), since Gregory XII in 1415 – and the first to do so of his own volition since Celestine V in 1294
Saw a vision of the Virgin Mary at Lourdes, 1858 Click to show or hide the answer
German Lutheran pastor, theologian, anti–Nazi dissident, hanged by the Nazis on 9 April 1945 after being found guilty of involvement in a plot to assassinate Hitler Click to show or hide the answer
Spanish–born Pope Alexander VI (1492–1503), popularly believed to have used his great wealth to buy the papacy; illegitimate children include Cesare and Lucretia; great patron of the arts; executed Savonarola, who preached against him Click to show or hide the answer
6th century Irish monk (a contemporary of St. Columba), famous for his legendary voyage to the "Isle of the Blessed" – some believe that he discovered America. Sometimes known as "the Navigator" Click to show or hide the answer
French–born Swiss reformer (1509–64): forced to leave Paris in 1534, established a rigorous theocracy (rule by priests) in Geneva; had the Spanish theologian Servetus burned for heresy; supported the Huguenots in their struggle in France, and the English Protestants persecuted by Queen Mary I; various Congregational, Reformed and Presbyterian churches, throughout the world (including the Church of Scotland), look to him as the chief expositor of their beliefs Click to show or hide the answer
4th century martyr, sentenced to be broken on a wheel, giving her name to a firework Click to show or hide the answer
The only Pope to abdicate (1296) Click to show or hide the answer
Founder of the monastery on Iona (563 AD) Click to show or hide the answer
First person to translate the complete Bible into English (1535) Click to show or hide the answer
The first Protestant Archbishop of Canterbury (1533–56): wrote and compiled the first two editions of the Book of Common Prayer; annulled Henry VIII's first two marriages, and divorced him from Anne of Cleves; burned as a heretic under Mary I Click to show or hide the answer
10th–century Archbishop of Canterbury: according to legend, seized the Devil's nose with a pair of red–hot tongs; gave his name (by a rather circuitous route) to the charity that supports vision–impaired ex–Armed Forces and National Service personnel in the UK (now known as Blind Veterans UK) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
7th–century Irish monk: fled to France seeking solitude, as his fame as a healer grew in Ireland; gave his name to a type of horse–drawn carriage (known in English as a Hackney cab) – via the name of a hospice that he established in northern France, which hired them out from about 1650 Click to show or hide the answer
Bishop of Rochester executed in 1535 Click to show or hide the answer
Giovanni Bernardone: said to be the first person to receive the stigmata, as a result of a vision in 1224; the prayer paraphrased by Margaret Thatcher to reporters on the steps of No. 10 Downing St., after being elected PM ("Where there is discord, may we bring harmony …") is attributed to Click to show or hide the answer
'The Apostle of the Indies' Click to show or hide the answer
First pope to come from a monastic background (590–604); famous for his prolific writings Click to show or hide the answer
Pope who issued the Gregorian calendar (1582) Click to show or hide the answer
Parish priest of Knock, Co. Mayo, from 1967 until his death in 1986 (while on a pilgrimage to Lourdes): known for his successful campaign to bring an airport to Knock, and his work on Knock Basilica; also credited with facilitating the visit of Pope John Paul II to Knock Shrine in 1979 Click to show or hide the answer
Archbishop of Westminster from 1976 until his death in 1999 Click to show or hide the answer
Czech priest, burned at the stake in 1451 for heresy against Catholic doctrines; considered the first Church reformer, as he lived before Luther, Calvin and Zwingli; a monument (unveiled in 1915 to commemorate the 500th anniversary of his martyrdom) stands in Old Town Square, Prague Click to show or hide the answer
16th–century Spanish priest and theologian (1491–1556): founder of the Society of Jesus (Jesuits), and author of the Spiritual Exercises (a set of Christian meditations, prayers and mental exercises) Click to show or hide the answer
Outspoken Bishop of Durham, 1984–94: perceived by some to have described the Resurrection as "a conjuring trick with bones"; criticised the policies of both Thatcher and Blair; York Minster was struck by lightning three days after his consecration Click to show or hide the answer
Paul VI's predecessor as Pope (1958–63) – the John after whom John Paul I was named Click to show or hide the answer
The first reigning Pope to visit Britain (1982) – see also Benedict XVI Click to show or hide the answer
(Former) Catholic priest: General Secretary 1980–5, and Chair 1987–90, of CND. Resigned from the priesthood in 1987, rather than comply with Cardinal Basil Hume's instruction to desist from involvement in the general election Click to show or hide the answer
Scottish religious reformer, wrote First Blast against the Monstrous Regiment of Women (1558) alluding in particular to the rule of Mary, Queen of Scots; said to have been responsible for turning the Scots against Mary Click to show or hide the answer
Appointed suffrogan Bishop of Stockport in 2015: the Church of England's first female bishop Click to show or hide the answer
Italian–born Archbishop of Canterbury, 1070–89 Click to show or hide the answer
Archbishop of Canterbury, c. 1207–1228; led the barons in forcing King John to sign the Magna Carta (John's refusal to recognise him as Archbishop, despite his consecration by Pope Innocent III, was one of the major factors in the crisis that led to it) Click to show or hide the answer
Archbishop of Canterbury executed in 1645 Click to show or hide the answer
Said to have been burnt to death on a gridiron, Rome 258 AD Click to show or hide the answer
The second Pope Click to show or hide the answer
Famously nailed his '95 Theses', denouncing the sale of indulgences, to the door of All Saints' Church, Wittenberg, in 1517; defended them at the Diet of Worms in 1521 Click to show or hide the answer
Claimed to have become a monk after narrowly missing being struck by lightning, aged 21, shortly after graduating; excommunicated in 1521 by Pope Leo X
Puritan minister, author and pamphleteer: born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1663; his Bonifacius: Essays to Do Good (1710) was a major influence on Benjamin Franklin (he was a family friend of the Franklins, and Ben Franklin's father owned a copy) Click to show or hide the answer
Popes Leo X, Clement XII, Leo XI: family Click to show or hide the answer
12th–Century Welsh bishop; author of Historia Regum Britannia – chief source of Arthurian legend Click to show or hide the answer
Founder and patron saint of Glasgow: its cathedral was built on the spot where he was buried (614) and is named after him; his shrine can be seen there, and his remains are thought to lie in the crypt. Also founded the cathedral at Llanelwy (St. Asaph) – he appointed Asaph to succeed him as bishop when he returned to Glasgow Click to show or hide the answer
Installed as Archbishop of Westminster, 2000, to replace the late Basil Hume Click to show or hide the answer
The first Christian bishop known to have visited Scotland (c. 400 AD) Click to show or hide the answer
Regarded as the founder of Christianity in Ireland, from where he is said to have banished all the snakes (although in reality there never were any); said to have died on March 17th, some time in the 5th century (possibly c. 460 or c. 493) Click to show or hide the answer
John Paul I's predecessor as Pope (1963–78) Click to show or hide the answer
The first Pope (Bishop of Rome) Click to show or hide the answer
Murdered in Rome on the same day; jointly commemorated on 29 June Click to show or hide the answer
Longest–reigning Pope (32 years, 1846–78) Click to show or hide the answer
Pope from March 1939 until 1958, and thus throughout World War II (real name Eugenio Pacelli) Click to show or hide the answer
Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland: hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn in 1681 after being found guilty of involvement in the fictitious Popish Plot – the last Catholic martyr to die in England Click to show or hide the answer
The last Roman Catholic Archbishop of Canterbury (1556–8) Click to show or hide the answer
Founded the Sunday Schools movement, in Gloucester (1780) Click to show or hide the answer
Former Bishop of Rochester and London burnt at the stake by Mary I, 1555 Click to show or hide the answer
Chief Rabbi of Great Britain and the Commonwealth, 1991– Click to show or hide the answer
Italian Domenican friar, led the revolt (1494) that expelled the Medicis and established a republic in Florence; arranged the original "bonfire of the vanities"; burned as a heretic 1498 by Pope Alexander VI (Rodrigo Borgia) Click to show or hide the answer
Early Christian martyr, suffered under Roman emperor Diocletian, 3rd century AD; commonly depicted in art and literature tied to a post and shot with arrows Click to show or hide the answer
Archbishop of Manila (Philippines), 1974–2003 (d. 2005) Click to show or hide the answer
Minister of Kingsway Hall (Methodist Central Hall, London) 1936–78; "Soap Box King" of Hyde Park Corner (d. 1998 aged 95) Click to show or hide the answer
The first Christian martyr (stoned to death 35 AD) Click to show or hide the answer
Dean of St. Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin, from 1714 until his death in 1745 (he failed to find a church position in England under Queen Anne, because of his Tory leanings); the proceeds from the first performance of Handel's Messiah (1742) were donated, at his request, to local charities and hospitals for the mentally ill; left the bulk of his fortune (£12,000) to found a mental hospital Click to show or hide the answer
Pope 314–225: New Year's Eve (31 December) is his feast day (died on New Year's Eve 335) Click to show or hide the answer
First head of the Spanish Inquisition (1483–98) Click to show or hide the answer
Appointed Bishop of Gloucester in 2015: the Church of England's first female dioscesan bishop, which means she was the first female bishop to sit in the House of Lords Click to show or hide the answer
Gloucestershire–born Protestant and humanist; translated the New Testament into English (the first printed version); burnt as a heretic 1536, while working on the Old Testament (had translated the Pentateuch and the Book of Jonah) Click to show or hide the answer
Anglo–Saxon princess of Mercia, c. 650–700; instrumental in English convent reform, patron saint of Chester Click to show or hide the answer
Virtually ruled England as Lord Chancellor, 1515–29 (preceded Thomas More) Click to show or hide the answer
English religious reformer, c1320–1384; dismissed from Oxford University in 1381 for criticising the traditional Church; translated the New Testament into English; the Council of Constance (1415) declared him a heretic and decreed that his body should be dug up and burnt, which was done in 1428 Click to show or hide the answer
14th–Century bishop and Chancellor of England who chiefly remodelled Winchester Cathedral Click to show or hide the answer
Swiss reformer: wrote the 67 Articles in 1523, which prompted rapid reform in Zurich after they were adopted as the city's official doctrine (Article 1 states "All who say that the Gospel is invalid without the confirmation of the church err and slander God." Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017–18