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Alloys

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Alloys

Added to iron to make steel (up to 1.7%) Click to show or hide the answer
An amalgam is any alloy of Click to show or hide the answer
Bronze is typically 88% copper, and 12% Click to show or hide the answer
Brass is typically 50–65% copper, and 50–35% Click to show or hide the answer
Spelter is an impure form of Click to show or hide the answer

A form of bronze, but with nearly twice as much tin (typically 78% copper, 22% tin) – named after the artefacts that are typically made from it Click to show or hide the answer
Created in Sheffield around 1770; often used for electroplating, as a cheaper alternative to nickel silver; 92% tin, 6% antimony, and 2% copper Click to show or hide the answer
Alloy of silver and gold (any proportion – usually about 75% gold) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Nickel–iron alloy noted for its extremely low coefficient of expansion; used in precision instruments, clocks etc.; invented in 1896 by Swiss scientist Charles Édouard Guillaume, who received the Nobel Prize for it Click to show or hide the answer
60% copper, 20% nickel, 20% zinc – a.k.a. German silver – introduced to Britain from Germany around 1830, largely superseding Sheffield plate Click to show or hide the answer
Typically 94% tin, 1% copper, 5% antimony; sometimes also bismuth and (less commonly today) lead; tin content can vary from 85% to 98% Click to show or hide the answer
Type of brass (typically 89–93% copper, 7–11% zinc), used to imitate gold; named after the London clockmaker who invented it in the early 18th century Click to show or hide the answer
Layered combinanion of silver and copper, used for many years (see Nickel silver) as a substitue for silver in a wide range of household articles: accidentally invented in 1743 by Thomas Boulsover Click to show or hide the answer
First produced in Sheffield by Harry Brearley, 1913; 85–88% steel, 12–15% chromium Click to show or hide the answer
Term used (since at least the 11th century) for an alloy of silver (92.5%) with some other metal – usually copper – for increased durability Click to show or hide the answer
Used in printing: 50–86% lead, 11–30% antimony, 3–20% tin Click to show or hide the answer
50% bismuth, 26.7% lead, 13.3% tin, 10% cadmium: named after the New York dentist who discovered it in 1860; notable for its low melting point Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017