General Knowledge Headquarters
The essential toolkit for quizzers

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Science
Chemicals
Common Names

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Drugs
Other

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Chemicals: Common Names

Drugs

This section looks at the different (chemical and common) names of drugs, from various perspectives.

Acetyl salicylic acid Click to show or hide the answer
Stimulant alkaloid, C8H10N 4O2, found in tea and coffee Click to show or hide the answer
A type of benzodiazepine, used for its calming effect; originally marketed as valium Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Methylene–dioxy–meth–amphetamine (MDMA) Click to show or hide the answer
Diamorphine hydrochloride or diacetyl morphine (diamorphine) Click to show or hide the answer
Common name for a drug formed by mixing alcohol with chloral hydrate Click to show or hide the answer
Fluoxetine hydrochloride Click to show or hide the answer
Drinamyl (triangular blue pills, popular with Mods in the 1960s) Click to show or hide the answer
Flunitrapezam Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Restoril and Normison are brand names for (a benzodiazepine, used for treating insomnia) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Diazepam was originally marketed as Click to show or hide the answer
Sildenafil is the generic name for a drug that is marketed as Click to show or hide the answer

Other

This section gives the chemical name of a chemical and asks for the common name.

Ethylene glycol Click to show or hide the answer
Sodium bicarbonate Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Sodium hydrogen carbonate Click to show or hide the answer
Sodium pyroborate Click to show or hide the answer
Silicon carbide (trade name) Click to show or hide the answer
Tri–chloro–methane Click to show or hide the answer
2–chloro benzano malono nitrile – discovered in 1928 by (and named after ) Ben Corson and Roger Stoughton at Middlebury College, Vermont; developed and tested at Porton Down; used as a riot control agent Click to show or hide the answer
Di–chloro–di–phenyl–tri–chloro–ethane (hyphens included here for clarity only) Click to show or hide the answer
(Hydrated) magnesium sulphate – used medicinally as a purgative Click to show or hide the answer
Deuterium oxide Click to show or hide the answer
Hydrated calcium sulphate – sets hard when mixed with water and dried Click to show or hide the answer
Iron hexa-cyano-ferrate – one of the first synthetic pigments (a deep blue colour) Click to show or hide the answer
Calcium oxide Click to show or hide the answer
Solution of ammonium carbonate, used as smelling salts Click to show or hide the answer
Silicon dioxide (the most common mineral) Click to show or hide the answer
Oil of vitriol Click to show or hide the answer
Hydrated magnesium silicate Click to show or hide the answer
Tri–chloro–phenyl–methyl–iodo–salicyl (trichlorophenol) Click to show or hide the answer
Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) resin Click to show or hide the answer
Ascorbic (ass–ORB–ic) acid Click to show or hide the answer
Sodium carbonate (crystalline decahydrate of) – when used as a water softener Click to show or hide the answer
Oxide (zirconium dioxide – ZrO2), used as a diamond substitute Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017