Monkey

Quiz Monkey
What do you want to know?

You are here:

Science
Chemicals
Miscellaneous

If you like my website, and/or if you've found it useful, please consider making a small donation to my Just Giving page, which I've set up just for this purpose. To begin with I'm collecting for a charity whose work I have benefitted from myself (and continue to do so): the British Heart Foundation. It would be great to raise £100 in the first month.

If you have already donated ... Thank You!

Chemicals: Miscellaneous

Water is densest at Click to show or hide the answer
Acid that vinegar is an impure dilute solution of Click to show or hide the answer
Produced when the enzyme zymase acts on glucose Click to show or hide the answer
Alanine, aspargine, glycine, leucine, lysine, methionine and tyrosine are examples of Click to show or hide the answer
Mixture of hydrochloric and nitric acids that can dissolve gold Click to show or hide the answer
To make a classroom volcano, you would add vinegar to (which other kitchen staple?) Click to show or hide the answer
Used in a barium meal or enema Click to show or hide the answer
The "opposite" of an acid – a chemical compound that donates hydrogen ions, or absorbs hydrogen ions when dissolved in water; reacts with an acid to produce water and a salt Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
First isolated by Faraday in 1825; structure discovered in 1865 by the German chemist Friedrich August Kekulé; gives its name to the "ring" structure found in many organic compounds Click to show or hide the answer
Drug used to regulate the heartbeat, invented in the 1950s by Nobel laureate James Black (of ICI); propanolol was the first to be marketed Click to show or hide the answer
Characteristic smell of (hydrogen) cyanide Click to show or hide the answer
Common use for chloride of lime Click to show or hide the answer
Colour of copper sulphate (crystals) Click to show or hide the answer
Traditionally supposed to have been added to the tea drunk by British servicemen, to suppress the libido Click to show or hide the answer
Colour of nitrous oxide Click to show or hide the answer
Major chemical constituent of limestone, chalk, marble, etc.; also of eggshells, snails' shells and pearls; calcite is the most common form of (aragonite and vaterite are other forms) Click to show or hide the answer
Major chemical constituent of bones Click to show or hide the answer
Gas that makes bread rise (produced by fermenting yeast); given off when baking powder is heated or moistened Click to show or hide the answer
Dry ice is the solid form of
Pumped into water to make it fizzy (see carbonic acid)
Acid that makes soft drinks fizzy Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Acid found in oranges, lemons etc. Click to show or hide the answer
Organic compounds formed by chemical reaction between acids and alcohols Click to show or hide the answer
Principal solvent in a tincture Click to show or hide the answer
Principal use of calcium nitrate Click to show or hide the answer
Acid found in bee and ant stings – also ("possibly" – Wikipedia) nettle stings Click to show or hide the answer
Sugar found in fruits Click to show or hide the answer
Invented, according to legend, around 1000 AD when a Chinese cook mixed saltpetre, sulphur and charcoal Click to show or hide the answer
Compounds containing only carbon and hydrogen Click to show or hide the answer
Acid found in the human stomach Click to show or hide the answer
Acid that cannot be kept in glass, because it dissolves it Click to show or hide the answer
Odorous gas used in stink bombs (characteristic smell of bad eggs) Click to show or hide the answer
Benzene hexachloride (BHC): used by gardeners as Click to show or hide the answer
Acid found in milk (particularly when it sours) Click to show or hide the answer
Sugar found in milk Click to show or hide the answer
Mixture of dyes, extracted from lichens, absorbed onto filter paper and used to test for pH (turns red in acid, blue in alkali) Click to show or hide the answer
Organic compound, solid at room temperature, mainly responsible for the characteristic aroma and flavour of peppermint and other mints; can be made synthetically Click to show or hide the answer
Main constituent of natural gas Click to show or hide the answer
Known to miners as firedamp; caused much loss of life in coal mines, before the invention of the Geordie lamp and Davy lamp
Food additive widely used in Chinese cooking – said to be responsible for "Chinese restaurant syndrome" Click to show or hide the answer
Mixture of naphthenic acid and palmitic acid Click to show or hide the answer
Toxic alkaloid with the chemical formula C10H14 N2 Click to show or hide the answer
Poisonous constituent of rhubarb leaves (also found in wood sorrel and other plants, and used in dying and bleaching) Click to show or hide the answer
Formed by the action of ultraviolet light (or electrical discharges) on oxygen (O2) Click to show or hide the answer
Alternative name for carbolic acid (C6H5OH) – also used for any one of a class of organic compounds of which this is the simplest member Click to show or hide the answer
Poison used in the fatal attack on Bulgarian dissident writer and BBC World Service journalist Georgi Markov, in London 1978 Click to show or hide the answer
Nerve gas used in the attack on the Tokyo subway in 1995 (12 people died) Click to show or hide the answer
Acid commonly used in car batteries – also known as oil of vitriol Click to show or hide the answer
Acid classified with the E–number E–334, used in soft drinks and confectionery to give a fruit flavour; also used in baking powder Click to show or hide the answer
Green coating that appears on copper, brass or bronze as it weathers (usually copper carbonate, sometimes copper chloride or copper acetate) Click to show or hide the answer
Result of adding an acid to a base Click to show or hide the answer
Products of burning pure hydrocarbons Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017