Monkey

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Fishes (etc.)

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Salmon – life cycle
Other

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Fishes (etc.)

This page covers more than fishes, but I don't know if there's a correct scientific term to include everything that it covers. Had I been in a more frivolous mood, I might have called it Seafood. Basically, it covers things that live underwater; this includes molluscs, crustaceans and other related creatures.

The snag is that not all molluscs and not all crustaceans live underwater.  For example, see the last entry!

The Life Cycle of the Salmon

The life cycle of the salmon varies slightly between species. The following describes the life cycle of the Atlantic salmon. Note also that the terminology is not definitive; for instance, there is some disagreement over the use of the term salmon as opposed to grilse. Grilse are often less prized by anglers as they are still not fully mature.

A newly hatched salmon with residual yolk sac still attached Click to show or hide the answer
Transitory stage between alevin and parr Click to show or hide the answer
A young salmon (less than three years old) that has not yet left its native stream Click to show or hide the answer
The final freshwater stage, before (and during) migration to the sea Click to show or hide the answer
A young salmon after one winter at sea Click to show or hide the answer
A salmon that has had two or more winters at sea Click to show or hide the answer
A mature salmon that has spawned (after which it will often die) Click to show or hide the answer

Other

Unusual characteristic of the mudskippers (several species of fish – specifically gobies) Click to show or hide the answer

Hearts of an octopus Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Legs of a starfish Click to show or hide the answer
Arms of a cuttlefish (as well as two tentacles; the difference is somewhat arcane, and the tentacles may or may not count as arms) Click to show or hide the answer
Legs of a lobster, crab, shrimp, crayfish etc. (order Decapods; the front pair of legs often have huge claws) Click to show or hide the answer
Legs of a woodlouse Click to show or hide the answer

Species of herring that invaded the Great Lakes in the 1950s and 60s, after bypassing Niagara Falls using the Welland Canal. Name said to be derived from comparison of its body shape with that of the typical tavern landlady Click to show or hide the answer
Family of fishes, native to Australia and south-east Asia, known for their habit of preying on land–based insects and other small animals by shooting them down with water droplets from their specialized mouths Click to show or hide the answer
Marine crustacean with varieties called acorn and goose Click to show or hide the answer
Colour of an octopus's blood Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
General term for various species of freshwater and marine fish, not closely related to each other, the common variety having the Latin name Abramis brama Click to show or hide the answer
The skeletons of sharks, skates and rays (and some other fishes – scientifically, the chondrichthyes) are made not of bone but of Click to show or hide the answer
More correct name for the tail fin Click to show or hide the answer
Pelagic fish live Click to show or hide the answer
Fish thought to be extinct but discovered in the Indian Ocean 1939 Click to show or hide the answer
Stinging cells of corals and sea anemones Click to show or hide the answer
Feeds on coral – seen by many as a threat to the Great Barrier Reef Click to show or hide the answer
Mollusc that protects itself with a cloud of brown ink and moves by jet propulsion Click to show or hide the answer
"Mermaids' purses" (a.k.a. "Devil's purses") – often found washed up on beaches – are really Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Genus of crabs (approximately 200 species) where the male has one greatly enlarged claw – the name comes from the motion it makes when gathering and eating food Click to show or hide the answer
A young fish that can extend its fins and has started to develop scales throughout its body, but has not yet reached sexual maturity Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
A recently hatched fish, whose yolk–sac has almost disappeared and whose swim bladder is operational to the point where the fish can actively feed for itself Click to show or hide the answer
The only British freshwater fish classified as both coarse and game Click to show or hide the answer
Named after the British–born naturalist who discovered it in Trinidad in 1866 Click to show or hide the answer
Family of crustaceans – not true crabs – which live in the empty shells of other crustaceans (typically sea snails) Click to show or hide the answer
Whitebait are young Click to show or hide the answer
Fish with five black spots, said to represent the fingermarks of St. Peter Click to show or hide the answer
The blue–ringed variety is the only type of ... that's known to be deadly to humans Click to show or hide the answer
Usually matures as a male and changes to a female later in life Click to show or hide the answer
Spat: larvae (sic) of (25mm or less in length; developed from eggs fertilised in water, having subsequently found a suitable place to settle) Click to show or hide the answer
Carnivorous warm–water fishes that attach themselves to sharks and ships Click to show or hide the answer
Area of the North Atlantic ocean in which American and European eels spawn Click to show or hide the answer
The eyes of a slug or snail (gastropod) are on the ends of its Click to show or hide the answer
The two types of sharks that are not predators but feed on plankton Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer
The major group of terrestrial crustaceans (land crabs also qualify) Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2018