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Cricket
Grounds

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English Test grounds
Other county grounds
Other Test grounds
Other

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Cricket Grounds

Hampshire village (near Portsmouth) known as "the cradle of cricket" – its club, founded in 1750, was the leading English club prior to the foundation of MCC in 1787. Richard Nyren, landlord of the Bat & Ball Inn which stands beside the original ground on Broadhalfpenny Down, was also captain of the club; they played England 51 times, winning 29 times Click to show or hide the answer

The six "traditional" English Test grounds

Lancashire (Manchester) – venue of the second Test match in England, and the first Ashes Test in England (1884) Click to show or hide the answer
Middlesex (St. John's Wood, London) – opened 1814, first Test match 1884 (11 days after Old Trafford); home of the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC); known as "the Home of Cricket" Click to show or hide the answer
Nottinghamshire (Nottingham) – one of its ends is called the Radcliffe Road End Click to show or hide the answer
Surrey's county ground – owned by the Duchy of Cornwall (Kennington, London); first leased to Surrey CCC in 1845; venue of (1) the first match played by an overseas touring cricket team in England (a team of Australian aborigines, 1868); (2) the FA Cup Finals of 1872 and 1874–92; (3) the first football international (England v. Scotland, 1872); (4) rugby internationals against Wales and Scotland (1876), and the first Varsity match (1877); (5) the first cricket Test match in England (v. Australia, 1880 – Australia winning by 7 runs in two days, leading to the famous mock obituary in the Sporting Times, which gave rise to the legend of the Ashes) Click to show or hide the answer
Warwickshire (Birmingham) Click to show or hide the answer
Yorkshire (Leeds) Click to show or hide the answer

Other county grounds

Durham (Chester–le–Street) – first used for a Test match against Zimbabwe in 2003 Click to show or hide the answer
Glamorgan (Cardiff) Click to show or hide the answer
Hampshire (West End, near Southampton) Click to show or hide the answer
Kent (Canterbury) Click to show or hide the answer
Leicestershire (Leicester) Click to show or hide the answer
Worcestershire (Worcester) Click to show or hide the answer
Essex's county ground is in Click to show or hide the answer
Gloucestershire's county ground is in Click to show or hide the answer
Somerset's county ground is in Click to show or hide the answer
Sussex's county ground is in Click to show or hide the answer

Other Test grounds

Note: the lists below, for the various Test playing countries, are not supposed to be complete. As I keep saying, this website is about the things that come up (or that I think are likely to come up) in pub quizzes.

Australia

Woolongabba ('The Gabba') Click to show or hide the answer
Western Australia Cricket Association (WACA) Ground Click to show or hide the answer

Bangladesh

Zohur Ahmed Chowdhury Stadium Click to show or hide the answer

India

Lal Bahadur Shastri Stadium (named after India's second prime minister, who died in office in 1964 aged 63) – 3 Tests, 1955–88; Rajiv Ghandi International Stadium (opened 2010) Click to show or hide the answer
Eden Gardens (not to be confused with Eden Park) Click to show or hide the answer

New Zealand

Eden Park (not to be confused with Eden Gardens) Click to show or hide the answer
The Basin (New Zealand's oldest Test ground) Click to show or hide the answer

Pakistan

Gaddafi Stadium (Pakistan's largest cricket ground – renamed in 1974 after the controversial Libyan leader, following a speech he gave at a meeting of the Organisation of the Islamic Conference in the city in support of Pakistan's right to pursue nuclear weapons) Click to show or hide the answer

South Africa

Newlands Click to show or hide the answer
Lord's No. 1 Ground (4 Tests, 1910–21 – demolished in 1922); Kingsmead (first Test 1923; traditionally the venue for Boxing Day Tests in South Africa) Click to show or hide the answer
St. George's Park (South Africa's oldest Test ground) Click to show or hide the answer
The Wanderers Click to show or hide the answer

Sri Lanka

Pallekele International Cricket Stadium, a.k.a. Muttiah Muralitharan International Cricket Stadium Click to show or hide the answer

West Indies

Kensington Oval (West Indies' first Test ground – 1930) Click to show or hide the answer
The Bourda (30 Tests, 1930–2005); Providence Stadium (built for the 2007 World Cup – first Test 2008) Click to show or hide the answer
Sabina Park (the third of the West Indies' traditional Test venues – also 1930); Andy Sandham of MCC scored 325 – the first ever triple century – in the first game; Garfield Sobers's 365 not out v. Pakistan in 1958 stood as a Test record for over 36 years Click to show or hide the answer
Sir Vivian Richards Stadium (built for the 2007 World Cup – first Test 2008; the ends are named after Richards's compatriots Curtly Ambrose and Andy Roberts) Click to show or hide the answer
Queen's Park Oval (West Indies' second Test ground, also 1930) Click to show or hide the answer
Windsor Park (completed too late for the 2007 World Cup – first Test 2011) Click to show or hide the answer
Antigua Recreation Ground (where Brian Lara scored his Test record 375) – 22 Tests, 1981–2009 Click to show or hide the answer

Other

Home of Cambridge University CC Click to show or hide the answer
Home of Oxford University CC Click to show or hide the answer
Opened as a cricket ground 1855 (Sheffield United CC was an umbrella organisation for six clubs that played there); hosted its first football match 1862; Yorkshire CCC played county games there from 1863 to 1973; home of The Wednesday FC 1880–7 (Sheffield United FC was founded in 1889); hosted a Test match in 1902; now used only for football Click to show or hide the answer
County ground where a lime tree just inside the boundary, said to be over 200 years old, blew down in 2005 Click to show or hide the answer
The only other first–class cricket ground with a tree inside the boundary (South Africa) Click to show or hide the answer
Match between Derbyshire & Lancashire abandoned because of snow, June 1975 Click to show or hide the answer
Grace Gates, Mound Stand, Long Room, Pavilion End, Nursery End; see also below Click to show or hide the answer

Four players who have stands named after them at Lord's :

Middlesex 1921–50, 25 Tests for England 1930–48 (11 as captain); born in Australia, his family moved to England when he was 6 to give the children an English education (he went to Eton and Cambridge); there were unsubstantiated rumours that his real father wasPlum Warner; a key member of England's fast bowling attack in the controversial 1932–3 Bodyline tour of Australia, when he criticised both Donald Bradman and England captain Douglas Jardine (although he later became a friend of both); later held key positions in the MCC, and came to be seen as an establishment figure as a result of his roles in the D'Oliveira controversy (1968) and the proposed South African tour of 1970; worked as a stockbroker in the London exchange, 1933–72; knighted 1986; nicknamed Gubby (from his initials) Click to show or hide the answer
Played for Middlesex 1936–58, and for MCC until 1964, scoring a record 38,942 first class runs; 78 Tests for England, 1936–50; also played 60 official (i.e. non–wartime) games for Arsenal, but (contrary to what you might hear) never played football for England; his elder brother Leslie also played for Arsenal and Middlesex, but represented England at football and not cricket; his grandson Nick captained Harrow in 2001, played first–class cricket for Middlesex 2001–10 and Somerset 2010–14, and also (although born in South Africa, where his London–born father had played first–class cricket) played Test cricket for England Click to show or hide the answer
Contemporary of Compton (Middlesex 1937–58, 39 Tests 1938–55): born in Norfolk, a No. 3 batsman and fast bowler; his cousin John played for Surrey 1958–78 and 77 Tests, 1963–76, and was considered one of the best batsmen of his generation Click to show or hide the answer
Middlesex 1894–1920, 15 Tests for England 1899–1912 (10 as captain); born in Trinidad (to a Spanish mother and an English father), educated at Rugby and Oxford; went on to be chairman of the England Test selectors in the 1930s, manager of the infamous 1932–3 Bodyline tour of Australia, and President of the MCC; knighted in 1937; known as "the Grand Old Man" of English cricket; nicknamed Plum Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017