Monkey

Quiz Monkey
What do you want to know?

You are here:

Sport
Rules

On this page:

General
Playing Times
Points to Win a Game
Playing Areas

If you like my website, and/or if you've found it useful, please consider making a small donation to my Just Giving page, which I've set up just for this purpose. To begin with I'm collecting for a charity whose work I have benefitted from myself (and continue to do so): the British Heart Foundation. It would be great to raise £100 in the first month.

If you have already donated ... Thank You!

Sport: Rules

The purpose of this page is really to enable comparison between different sports – particularly in terms of playing times, the number of points required to win a game, and the size of playing areas.

Where a sport has one or more pages dedicated to itself, rules other than those indicated in the previous paragraph will normally be found in those pages.

See also Teams (for the number of players in a team).

General

Baseball: number of umpires Click to show or hide the answer
Baseball: distances between (the centres, or 'points', of) the bases Click to show or hide the answer
Basketball: height of the hoop Click to show or hide the answer
Basketball: diameter of the hoop Click to show or hide the answer
Diving (Olympic) Springboard Click to show or hide the answer
High diving board Click to show or hide the answer
Hurling: points for a goal (over the crossbar is 1 point) Click to show or hide the answer
Australian rules football: points for a goal (a behind scores 1) Click to show or hide the answer
Rugby League: number of tackles before the ball passes to the opposition Click to show or hide the answer

Rugby: points scored

  League Union
Try Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Conversion Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Penalty goal Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Drop goal Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

Rugby Union: sides guilty of "further misconduct" after an infringement (e.g. arguing with the ref) must retreat Click to show or hide the answer
Table tennis: number of points between change of serve (since 2001) Click to show or hide the answer
Tennis: score in a set when the tie–break comes into operation Click to show or hide the answer
Tug of war: distance that the rope must travel (English rules) Click to show or hide the answer
Volleyball: a team can hit the ball (without it going over the net) Click to show or hide the answer

Playing Times

American football (without over time) Click to show or hide the answer
Australian rules football Click to show or hide the answer
Basketball (international competition) Click to show or hide the answer
Basketball (US NBA) Click to show or hide the answer
(Field) hockey Click to show or hide the answer
Ice hockey Click to show or hide the answer
Polo: each chukka Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Polo: number of chukkas (most commonly) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Water polo (international competition, including Olympics) Click to show or hide the answer

Points to Win a Game

Badminton (since 2006) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Badminton (before 2006) Click to show or hide the answer
Squash Click to show or hide the answer
Table tennis (since 2001) Click to show or hide the answer
Table tennis (prior to 2001) Click to show or hide the answer

In all of the above sports, you need a two–point margin (as well as the above minimum points scores) to win a game.

Playing Areas

Football

This section used to note that I didn't ever remember being asked about the size of a football pitch – possibly because it's ridiculously complicated. This observation was made obsolete in February 2018, when contestants in Macclesfield Quiz League were asked what the maximum width was. (The figure given was the one under 'Other' below.)

Internationals Other
Minimum width Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Maximum width Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Minimum length Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Maximum length Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Minimum area Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Maximum area Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

In 2008, a standard pitch size was provisionally agreed by the International Football Association Board (IFAB):

Length Click to show or hide the answer Width Click to show or hide the answer Area Click to show or hide the answer

This standard pitch was never implemented.

Other

360ft x 160ft Click to show or hide the answer
44ft x 20ft Click to show or hide the answer
28 yards by 35 yards (84 feet by 105 feet) (reference) Click to show or hide the answer
14 metres long, and between 1.5 and 2 metres wide Click to show or hide the answer
100yds x 60yds; goal 12ft x 7ft Click to show or hide the answer
100 feet x 50 feet (30.5 x 15.25 metres); minimum headroom 7.50 metres, or 8.30 metres for internationals Click to show or hide the answer
300 yds (270 m) by 160 yds (150 m) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
12ft x 6ft – when full–sized – playing surface (i.e. excluding the cushions) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
2’ 10” to the top of the cushions (with ½" tolerance)
32ft x 21ft Click to show or hide the answer
9ft (2.74 m) x 5ft (1.525 m) Click to show or hide the answer
2ft 6in from the ground
60 ft x 42 inches Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017