Monkey

Quiz Monkey
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Travel
Railways

On this page:

Beginnings
Stations
Trains and Locomotives
People
Lines
The London Underground
Heritage Lines
The Orient Express
Eurostar
Other

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Railways

Beginnings

Competition run by the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, October 1829, to decide whether they used stationary engines or locomotives – won by Stephenson's Rocket Click to show or hide the answer
The unsuccessful entries were Cycloped, Novelty, Perseverance and Sans Pareil

Ten locomotives were entered for the Rainhill Trials, but only these five actually took part.

Stations

Britain's highest railway station: on a funicular railway that opened in 2001, at 1,097 metres (3,599 feet), on (Scottish mountain) Click to show or hide the answer
Features a café and museum called Brief Encounter Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
London's first station (1837) Click to show or hide the answer
On the North Yorkshire Moors heritage line, used as Hogsmeade in the Harry Potter films and Aidensfield in Heartbeat Click to show or hide the answer
Largest railway station in the world (opened 1913) Click to show or hide the answer
London terminus of the Eurostar service Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's most northerly railway station Click to show or hide the answer
More platforms than any other British station Click to show or hide the answer

Bristol, Horwich (for Bolton), Southampton Airport, Thanet, Coleshill (for Birmingham), East Midlands (for Nottingham, Derby, Loughborough): all served by stations called Click to show or hide the answer
Cardiff Central, Edinburgh Haymarket, London King's Cross, Stockport: all have Click to show or hide the answer

Trains and Locomotives

George Stephenson's first locomotive (Killingworth Colliery, 1814) Click to show or hide the answer
Luxury train from Pretoria to Cape Town, via Johannesburg (originally Johannesburg to Cape Town, carrying passengers to the ships departing for England) Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Popular English name for the Japanese Shinkansen (literally New Trunk Line) Click to show or hide the answer
Passenger train from Toronto to Vancouver Click to show or hide the answer
1937–9, London to Glasgow: gave its name to a piece of orchestral music by Vivian Ellis, which became the theme tune to the TV series Paul Temple Click to show or hide the answer
Last steam locomotive built by British Railways (no. 92220) – built at Swindon in 1960 Click to show or hide the answer
London–Edinburgh service, inaugurated in 1862 as the Special Scotch Express. Left King's Cross and Waverley at 10:00. Known informally from the 1870s, and formally from 1924, as Click to show or hide the answer
The world's most famous steam locomotive: No. 4472, built in 1923 at Doncaster for the LNER: gave 40 years' service on the London–Edinburgh service after which it was named (see above); the first steam locomotive to achieve a speed of over 100 mph (1934); BR number 60103; retired from regular service in 1963, after covering just over 2 million miles; set a record for the longest non–stop run by a steam locomotive – 422 miles (679 km) – in Australia, 1989; returned to service (running special tours) in 2016 after a 10–year restoration costing £4.5 million Click to show or hide the answer
Informal name for the train that runs across Australia, through South Australia and Northern Territory, from Adelaide to Darwin via Alice Springs (also serves Coober Pedy, without actually passing through it) – an abbreviation of a nickname referring to the camel trains that previously plied the same route Click to show or hide the answer
Luxury service from London to Paris, 1926–72: run jointly by Southern Railways (later British Rail) and SNCF, known on either side of the Channel by the equivalent English and French names Click to show or hide the answer
George Stephenson's first successful locomotive – ran on the Stockton–Darlington Click to show or hide the answer
Built at Doncaster, entered service on 3 March 1938; set a world speed record for a steam locomotive, of 126mph (which still stands), on 3 July 1938 Click to show or hide the answer
Ran daily between Manchester and Bournemouth, 1910–67; believed to have been named after the trees growing in the Chines between Bournemouth and Poole Click to show or hide the answer
London–Glasgow passenger service, 1862–2003 – left Euston at 10:00 Click to show or hide the answer
Steam locomotive built by a private trust – the first built in Britain since Evening Star in 1960 – unveiled at Darlington in 2008 Click to show or hide the answer
Luxury train, once Calais – Riviera via Paris, now Paris – Riviera Click to show or hide the answer

People

Engineer responsible for the construction of the Great Western Railway, including Paddington station; built the Atmospheric Railway in Devon Click to show or hide the answer
Designer of Puffing Billy and Wylam Willie Click to show or hide the answer
'The Railway King' – born near York 1800, made a fortune by investing in railways, but ruined by revelations of fraud and bribery of MPs Click to show or hide the answer
Run over by Stephenson's Rocket, at the opening of the Liverpool to Manchester, 1830 – first person to die in a railway accident Click to show or hide the answer
English engineer, known as the "Father of Railways"; gave his name to the standard gauge, estimated to be used on 55% of the world's lines, which he was the first to use Click to show or hide the answer
Designer and builder of the first steam locomotive (1804) Click to show or hide the answer
Dutch–born US engineer: invented and gave his name to the system for classifying locomotives by wheel configuration (4–6–0, 2–4–2, etc.) Click to show or hide the answer

Lines

Venice–Simplon–Orient Express, 1982– Click to show or hide the answer
Acronym used for rail systems in Dallas and Dublin (… Area Rapid Transit, in both cases) Click to show or hide the answer
Major rail line of Canada and New England, 1852–1923 – headquarters in London Click to show or hide the answer
The world's first inter–city passenger rail service, opened 1830 Click to show or hide the answer
Orient Express (classic route, 1883–1977) Click to show or hide the answer
Indian Pacific Railway Click to show or hide the answer
The first public railway Click to show or hide the answer
The world's longest continuous railway line — 9,289 kilometres, from Moscow to Vladivostok – completed 1917 Click to show or hide the answer
Met in 1869 to form the USA's first transcontinental railroad Click to show or hide the answer
The Trans–Siberian Railway runs for 9,289 kilometres, from Moscow to Click to show or hide the answer

The London Underground

This is not the only place on this website where you might read the next fifteen words.

You know the question setter is struggling for inspiration when you get a question about ... London Tube lines. Especially if you're two hundred miles from London at the time.

But it does happen – all the time – so the Quiz Monkey has to cover it.

The most common type of question goes "On the London Underground map, which line is coloured ... ?" The next most common is "Which London Underground line goes from ... to ... ?"

In the second type of question, you can optionally name a point of the compass for either or both termini.

(Another way of phrasing the second type of question is "Which London Underground line has termini at ... ?")

The following table should prepare you for both types of question.

Brown Harrow & Wealdstone (North) Elephant & Castle (South) Click to show or hide the answer
Red West Ruislip (North-West) Epping (North-East) Click to show or hide the answer
Yellow Links Paddington, Baker Street, Kings Cross, Liverpool Street, Victoria Click to show or hide the answer
Dark(ish) Green Ealing Broadway and Richmond (West)
Edgware Road and Barons Court (North-West)
Wimbledon (South-West)
Upminster (East) Click to show or hide the answer
Pink Hammersmith (West) Barking (East) Click to show or hide the answer
Silver (Grey) Stanmore (North) Stratford (East) Click to show or hide the answer
Purple Uxbridge, Amersham, Chesham and Watford Junction (West) Aldgate (City) Click to show or hide the answer
Black Edgware and High Barnet (North) Morden (South) Click to show or hide the answer
Royal Blue Uxbridge and Heathrow Terminal 5 (West) Cockfosters (North-East) Click to show or hide the answer
Sky Blue Walthamstow Central (North-East) Brixton (South) Click to show or hide the answer
Pale Green Waterloo Bank Click to show or hide the answer

Here are a few other questions I've heard over the years. In each case, the answer is the name of a line:

Longest (47 miles) Click to show or hide the answer
Most stations (60) Click to show or hide the answer
Opened in 1977 – originally to be called the Fleet; connects with every other Underground line, following extension in 1999. (Central and Northern lines also do so after the closure of the East London Line in 2007 for transfer to London Overground) Click to show or hide the answer
First line on the London Underground (Paddington–Farringdon Street, 1863) Click to show or hide the answer
Extended in 1977 to serve Heathrow Airport Click to show or hide the answer
Colloquially known as The Drain, possibly because it is underground but operated by staff who normally work above ground (links Waterloo mainline station with Bank underground) Click to show or hide the answer

Heritage Lines

East / West Sussex border, from Sheffield Park to Kingscote Click to show or hide the answer
Heywood to Rawtenstall, via Bury and Ramsbottom – opened 1987 Click to show or hide the answer
Narrow gauge line built to carry slate to the coast at Porthmadog – operated commercially 1836–1946, re–opened as a heritage line 1954; the world's oldest railway company Click to show or hide the answer
Keighley to Oxenhope – re–opened 1968; featured in The Railway Children, Yanks, Last of the Summer Wine (one episode) Click to show or hide the answer
Narrow gauge line from the Cumbrian coast to Boot in the Lake District — affectionately known locally as "La'al Ratty" Click to show or hide the answer
Narrow gauge line in Kent – runs from one of the Cinque ports (Hythe) to Dungeness – opened 1927 Click to show or hide the answer
Bridgnorth (Salop) to Kidderminster (Worcs) – re–opened 1970 Click to show or hide the answer

The Orient Express

Date on which the Orient Express first ran Click to show or hide the answer
Western terminus of the Orient Express (until 1977) Click to show or hide the answer
Bulgarian Black Sea port that was the eastern terminus of the Orient Express from 1883–9 (passengers then travelling to Istanbul by ferry) Click to show or hide the answer
Orient Express first ran direct from Paris to Istanbul (using two trains, with a ferry across the Danube from Giurgiu in Romania to Rousse in Bulgaria) Click to show or hide the answer
Tunnel through the Alps that opened in 1919, allowing a more southerly route Click to show or hide the answer
Twin destinations of the Arlberg Orient Express, 1930–39 and 1945–62 Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer
Classic route via Venice, Budapest and Bucharest terminated Click to show or hide the answer
Simplon Orient Express terminated; the Orient Express last ran to Istanbul Click to show or hide the answer
Venice–Simplon–Orient–Express first ran (from Calais to Venice) Click to show or hide the answer

Eurostar

London terminus prior to November 2007 Click to show or hide the answer
London terminus from November 2007 Click to show or hide the answer
Other stops in the UK (both in Kent) Click to show or hide the answer
Click to show or hide the answer
Paris terminus Click to show or hide the answer
Other European capital served Click to show or hide the answer
City in northern France where the Paris and Brussels lines separate Click to show or hide the answer

Other

Standard gauge on British railways Click to show or hide the answer
London Underground (Metropolitan Line) first opened Click to show or hide the answer
Maximum speed of the Virgin Pendolino train (introduced 2004; in practice, limited to 125 mph) Click to show or hide the answer
US equivalent of British Rail Click to show or hide the answer
The world's longest stretch of straight railway track (309 miles) is in Click to show or hide the answer
Channel Tunnel passenger services: operated by UK, France and Click to show or hide the answer
Two–mile tunnel through the Cotswolds between Chippenham and Bath, which completed the GWR; over 100 men died during its construction Click to show or hide the answer
British railway timetables, published annually 1839 – 1961 Click to show or hide the answer
The world's second oldest underground railway system (opened 2 May 1896) Click to show or hide the answer
Flat metal plate that connects rails Click to show or hide the answer
Distance between the rails Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's second oldest underground railway system (opened 14 December 1896) Click to show or hide the answer
Controls the infrastructure of British railways, since buying Railtrack in 2002 Click to show or hide the answer
Overhead cable for electric trains Click to show or hide the answer
Word, originating in Italian, used by Virgin for its tilting trains Click to show or hide the answer
Controlled the infrastructure of British railways, from privatisation in 1994 until sold by its parent company in 2002 Click to show or hide the answer
The Ffestiniog Railway was built to carry Click to show or hide the answer
French high–speed train (Train à Grand Vitesse) Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017