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A&E Literature Poems

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Poems

This page is about specific quotations from poetry.  You might be asked who wrote the line(s), or the title of poem that they come from.

For questions of the type "Who wrote such-and-such a poem?", and other stuff about poets (including poets laureate), see Poets.

For anything else that you might get asked about poetry (including terminology, poems and collections of poetry, and details of the contents of poems), see Poetry.

Quotation Title Poet
I sit in one of the dives
On Fifty–second Street
Uncertain and afraid
As the clever hopes expire
Of a low dishonest decade:
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Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone
Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone
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This is the night mail crossing the border
Bringing the cheque and the postal order
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Within the woodlands, flow'ry gladed,
By the oak tree's mossy moot, 
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And there for me the apple tree
Do lean down low in ...
Red hair she had and golden skin
Her sulky lips were shaped for sin
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Come friendly bombs, and fall on Slough
It isn't fit for humans now
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Miss J. Hunter Dunn, Miss J. Hunter Dunn
Furnish'd and burnish'd by Aldershot sun
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They shall not grow old as we that are left grow old
Age shall not wither them, nor the years decay
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Tyger! tyger! burning bright
In the forests of the night
What immortal hand or eye
Dare frame thy fearful symmetry
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Stands the church clock at ten to three, and is there honey still for tea? Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
An unofficial English rose ...
If I should die, think only this of me:
That there's some corner of a foreign field
That is forever England
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How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Oh, to be in England / Now that April's there Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Hamelin Town's in Brunswick,
By famous Hanover city;
The river Weser, deep and wide … (opening lines)
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Rats!
They fought the dogs and killed the cats
And bit the babies in the cradles
Come in, the Mayor cried, looking bigger
And in did come the strangest figure!
God's in his heaven
All's right with the world
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O, my luve's like a red, red rose Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Wee, sleekit, cowran, tim'rous beastie (first line) Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
The best–laid schemes o mice an men
Gang aft agley
The Assyrian came down like a wolf on the fold Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
The mountains look on Marathon
And Marathon looks on the sea
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And then there was champagne with foaming whirls
As white as Cleopatra's melted pearls
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She walks in beauty, like the night
Of cloudless climes and starry skies
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Where were the rapture then to clasp the form
From this lewd grasp and lawless contact warm?
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So we'll go no more a–roving, so late into the night
Though the heart be still as loving, and the Moon be still so bright
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'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves did gyre and gimble in the wabe Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
All mimsy were the borogroves
And the mome raths outgrabe …
… the jaws that bite, the claws that catch … and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!
The sun was shining on the sea
Shining with all its might
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White founts falling in the courts of the Sun (first line) Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
By thy long grey beard and glittering eye,
Now wherefore stopp'st thou me?
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Alone, alone; all, all alone
At Xanadu did Kubla Khan
A stately pleasure–dome decree
Where Alph, the sacred river, ran
Through caverns measureless to man
Down to a sunless sea
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A damsel with a dulcimer
In a vision once I saw:
It was an Abyssinian maid
And on her dulcimer she played
Singing of Mount Abora
O for a closer walk with God
A calm and heavenly frame
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God moves in a mysterious way, his wonders to perform Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
What is this life if full of care
We have no time to stand and stare
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Because I could not stop for Death
He kindly stopped for me
The Carriage held but just Ourselves
And Immortality
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Death be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadful …
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Go, and catch a falling star / Get with child a mandrake root Click to show or hide the answer
Go placidly amidst the noise and haste (first line) Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Let us go then, you and I
When the evening is spread out against the sky
Like a patient etherised upon a table (opening lines)
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In the room the women come and go
Talking of Michelangelo
April is the cruellest month (first line) Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
I will show you fear in a handful of dust
Shantih shantih sahntih (last line; shantih is Sanskrit for "inner peace")
The moving finger writes, and having writ moves on Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
The curfew tolls the knell of passing day
The lowly herd winds slowly oer the lea
The ploughman homeward plods his weary way
And leaves the world to darkness and to me
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Far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife …
The paths of glory lead but to the grave …
Where ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
The boy stood on the burning deck
Whence all but he had fled.
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Gather ye rosebuds while ye may: first line of Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
His death, which happened in his berth
At forty–odd befell;
They went and told the sexton, and
The sexton toll'd the bell
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I remember, I remember
The house where I was born
The little window where the sun
Came peeping in at morn
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No shade, no shine, no butterflies, no bees
No fruits, no flowers, no leaves, no birds – November!
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Glory be to God for dappled things
For skies of couple–colour as a brinded cow (first line)
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Into my heart an air that kills
From yon far country blows:
What are those blue remembered hills,
What spires, what farms are those?
This is the land of lost content,
I see it shining plain,
The happy highways where I went
And cannot come again.
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But since the man that runs away
Lives to die another day,
And cowards' funerals, when they come,
Are not wept so well at home
Clunton and Clunbury,
Clungunford and Clun,
Are the quietest places
Under the sun.
Drink to me only with thine eyes Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness
Close bosom friend of the maturing sun
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A thing of beauty is a joy forever (first line) Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Deep in the shady sadness of a vale Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Souls of poets dead and gone
What Elysium have ye known
Happy field or mossy cavern
Choicer than the Mermaid Tavern?
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Thou still unravish'd bride of quietness
Though foster–child of Silence and slow Time
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Beauty is truth, truth beauty – that is all
Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know
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Thou wast not born for death, immortal bird Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Was it a vision, or a waking dream?
Fled is that music:—Do I wake or sleep? (ending of)
I think that I shall never see
A poem lovely as a tree
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O East is East and West is West
And ne'er the twain shall meet.
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Gentleman–rankers out on the spree
Damned from here to eternity
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Though I've belted you and flayed you
By the living Gawd that made you
You're a better man than I am …
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If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you …
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If you can fill each unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds worth of battle run
Yours is the world, and everything that's in it
And what is more, you'll be a man my son.
The Female of the Species is more deadly than the Male Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
A woman is always a woman, but a good cigar is a smoke Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Sexual intercourse began
In nineteen sixty–three
(which was rather late for me)
Between the end of the Chatterley ban
And the Beatles' first LP
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Last verse: So life was never better than / in 1963 ... (etc.)
They (mess) you up, your Mum and Dad
They may not mean to, but they do
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Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free
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I shot an arrow in the air
It fell to earth, I knew not where
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On the shores of Gitchee Gumee,
On the dunes of Nagow Wudjoo
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Under a spreading chestnut tree
The village smithy stands
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There was a little girl
And she had a little curl
Right in the middle of her forehead.
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Listen my children and you shall hear
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere
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Into each life some rain must fall Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Stone walls do not a prison make
Nor iron bars a cage
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Quinquereme of Nineveh, from distant Ophir Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
I must go down to the seas again
To the lonely sea and the sky
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James James Morrison Morrison Weatherby George Dupree
Took great care of his mother, though he was only three
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Tomorrow to fresh woods and pastures new ... Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
When I consider how my light is spent ... Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
They also serve who only stand and wait
Wherefore with thee
Came not all Hell broke loose?
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Candy is dandy
But liquor is quicker
(later added Pot is not)
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There's a breathless hush in the close tonight
Ten to make and the match to win
A bumping pitch and a blinding light
An hour to play and the last man in
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Refrain: Play up! Play up! And play the game!
Drakes in his hammock, till the great Armadas come
Capten, art thou sleepen there below?
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How happy is the blameless vestal's lot!
The world forgetting, by the world forgot.
Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind!
Each pray'r accepted, and each wish resign'd...
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Fools rush in where angels fear to tread Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
A little learning is a dang'rous thing
To err is human; to forgive, divine
Better by far that you should forget and smile
Than that you should remember and be sad
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Oh, what a tangled web we weave
When first we practise to deceive!
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Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May ...
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I summon up remembrance of things past Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
How wonderful is Death
Death, and his brother Sleep!
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Hail to thee blithe spirit (first line) Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
O wild West wind, thou breath of Autumn's being (first line) Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
If Winter comes, can Spring be far behind? (last line)
I met a traveller from an ancient land ... (first line) Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
"My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings / Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair!"
I come from haunts of coot and tern Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Half a league, half a league, half a league onward
All in the valley of Death rode the six hundred …
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Theirs not to make reply, theirs not to reason why, theirs but to do and die ...
Into the jaws of Death, into the mouth of Hell
Rode the six hundred
'tis better to have loved and lost
Than never to have loved at all
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… Nature, red in tooth and claw
On either side the river lie / Long fields of barley and of rye … (opening lines) Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
The mirror crack'd from side to side ...
The splendour falls on castle walls
And snowy summits old in story
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Now as I was young and easy, under the apple boughs Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Do not go gentle into that dark night ... Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
And for that minute a blackbird sang / Close by, and round him, mistier, / Farther and farther, all the birds / Of Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire (last verse) Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
For the hand that rocks the cradle is the hand that rules the world (refrain) Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Laugh, and the world laughs with you; Weep, and you weep alone. (Opening lines) Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
He did not wear his scarlet coat
For blood and wine are red (opening lines)
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Not a drum was heard, not a funeral note
As his corpse to the rampart we hurried;
Not a soldier discharged his farewell shot
O'er the grave where our hero we buried
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I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o'er vales and hills
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils
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My heart leaps up when I behold
A rainbow in the sky
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The child is father of the man
I've measured it from side to side
'Tis three feet long and two feet wide
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Earth has not anything to show more fair Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer
Dull would he be of soul who could pass by
A sight so touching in its majesty
Wine comes in at the mouth
And love comes in at the eye;
That's all we shall know for truth
Before we grow old and die.
I lift the glass to my mouth,
I look at you, and I sigh.
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I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017–18