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Poets Laureate
Refusals
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Poets

This page is concerned with questions that are specifically about poets – including poets laureate and who wrote what poem.

For questions of the type "Which poem includes the line(s) ... ?", see Poems.

For anything else that you might get asked about poetry (including terminology, poems and collections of poetry, and details of the contents of poems), see Poetry.

Poets Laureate

Gulielmus Peregrinus was appointed "versificator regis" (King's poet) to Click to show or hide the answer
According to Wikipedia, the term 'Poet Laureate' dates from the appointment of Bernard André, a French Augustine friar, as an official chronicler of the reign of Click to show or hide the answer
Often called the first Poet Laureate – granted a pension by James I of England in 1619 Click to show or hide the answer
Godson of Shakespeare (rumoured – probably falsely – to be his "natural" son); succeeded Jonson following the latter's death in 1637 Click to show or hide the answer
The first official Poet Laureate (1668–89 – title conferred by letters patent) Click to show or hide the answer
(Various incumbents 1689–1813)
1813–43 Click to show or hide the answer
1843–50 Click to show or hide the answer
1850–92: longest time in office Click to show or hide the answer
1896–1913 Click to show or hide the answer
1913–30 Click to show or hide the answer
1930–67 Click to show or hide the answer
1968–72 Click to show or hide the answer
1972–84 Click to show or hide the answer
1984–98 Click to show or hide the answer
1999–2009: stipulated that he would fulfil the role for only ten years, breaking the tradition of its being held for life Click to show or hide the answer
2009– Click to show or hide the answer

Refusals

The following poets turned down the post of Poet Laureate:

1757, following the death of Colley Cibber Click to show or hide the answer
1813, following the death of Henry James Pye Click to show or hide the answer
1850, following the death of Wordsworth (he was 87 years old and died five years later) Click to show or hide the answer
1892, following the death of Tennyson Click to show or hide the answer
1984, following the death of Betjeman Click to show or hide the answer

Authors

Q: Who wrote the poem(s) ... ?   A:
In Memory of W. B. Yeats Click to show or hide the answer
Funeral Blues (read by John Hannah at the funeral in Four Weddings and a Funeral) – sometimes known by its first line, "Stop all the clocks" Click to show or hide the answer
I Wish I'd Looked After Me Teeth Click to show or hide the answer
Les fleurs du mal (Flowers of evil – 1857, French poet) Click to show or hide the answer
The Bad Child's Book of Beasts, Cautionary Tales Click to show or hide the answer
Metroland; Joan Hunter Dunn (1915–2008) was a muse to Click to show or hide the answer
Words to Jerusalem ("And did those feet …"); Visions of the Daughters of Albion, Songs of Innocence and Experience, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell Click to show or hide the answer
The Pied Piper of Hamelin, How they Brought the Good News from Ghent to Aix, Pauline, My Last Duchess; Home Thoughts, From Abroad Click to show or hide the answer
Holy Willie's Prayer, Auld Lang Syne, Address to a Haggis, To a Mouse Click to show or hide the answer
Don Juan, Childe Harold's Pilgrimage Click to show or hide the answer
7th–century herdsman from Whitby, said to have been the first English poet Click to show or hide the answer
Poems Descriptive of Rural Life and Scenery (1829); The Village Minstrel (1821); The Shepherd's Calendar (1827); The Rural Muse (1835): collections by Click to show or hide the answer
The Divine Comedy (1300–21) Click to show or hide the answer
Songs of Childhood: written under the pseudonym Walter Ramal, by Click to show or hide the answer
Because I Could Not Stop for Death (published posthumously 1886) Click to show or hide the answer
"Gone with the wind" and "the days of wine and roses" are quotations from (English poet, 1867–1900; titles are Latin quotations from Horace and too hard for quizzes!) Click to show or hide the answer
Regarded as the chief exponent of heroic tragedy; major works include the tragedy All for Love, the satire Absalom and Achitophel, the Essay of Dramatick Poesie, Song for St. Cecilia's Day, and Annus Mirabilis (about 1666, the war with the Dutch and the Great Fire of London) – see above under Poets Laureate Click to show or hide the answer
The Waste Land; The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock; The Four Quartets; Of Ash Wednesday; Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats Click to show or hide the answer
Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam: translated into English by Click to show or hide the answer
The Bab Ballads (Fun magazine, 1861) Click to show or hide the answer
Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard (1751) Click to show or hide the answer
Neutral Tones (1898), The Darkling Thrush (1901), The Ruined Maid (1901), The Respectable Burgher (1901), The Man he Killed (1902), A Trampwoman's Tragedy (1903), The Dynasts (a three–part "verse drama" – not intended to be staged – 1904–8), The Convergence of the Twain (1915), The Blinded Bird (1916) Click to show or hide the answer
The Wreck of the Deutschland (1875–6, dedicated to five nuns who died in the wreck), The Windhover (1877, dedicated "to Christ our Lord") – both pub. 1918 Click to show or hide the answer
A Shropshire Lad (cycle of 63 poems, published 1896) Click to show or hide the answer
The Thought–Fox Click to show or hide the answer
Endymion; Ode to Autumn; Ode to a Grecian Urn; Ode to a Nightingale; Lines on the Mermaid Tavern; Hyperion; On the Grasshopper and the Cricket Click to show or hide the answer
Barrack Room Ballads – including Mandalay, Gunga Din; If; The Female of the Species Click to show or hide the answer
The Piers Plowman poems Click to show or hide the answer
The Whitsun Weddings, Church Going Click to show or hide the answer
The Mosquito, Bavarian Gentians, Innocent England Click to show or hide the answer
English writer, popularised the limerick in his Book of Nonsense (1846); wrote The Pobble who Had No Toes, The Dong with the Luminous Nose, The Owl and the Pussycat Click to show or hide the answer
Jenny Kissed Me (1838), Abou Ben Adhem Click to show or hide the answer
Hyperion (1839), Excelsior, The Village Blacksmith, The Wreck of the Hesperus (all 1841), Evangeline (1847), The Song of Hiawatha (1855), Paul Revere's Ride (1860) Click to show or hide the answer
Famous lamentation for the Tay Bridge railway disaster Click to show or hide the answer
The Earth Compels, Plant and Phantom, Snow, Bagpipe Music, Autumn Journal Click to show or hide the answer
Le Morte d'Arthur Click to show or hide the answer
Reynard the Fox Click to show or hide the answer
Modern Love (1862, collection), The Lark Ascending (1881) Click to show or hide the answer
Silly Verse for Kids (1959): including (possibly in a later edition?) On the Ning Nang Nong – voted in 2004 as Britain's favourite comic poem Click to show or hide the answer
Wrote about James James Morrison Morrison Wetherby George Dupree Click to show or hide the answer
Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained; Comus (masque), Lycidas (elegy), Samson Agonistes (verse drama) Click to show or hide the answer
'Twas the Night Before Christmas Click to show or hide the answer
Admirals All, Drake's Drum, The Fighting Temeraire Click to show or hide the answer
Author of the poem that inspired Elgar's Dream of Gerontius Click to show or hide the answer
The Highwayman Click to show or hide the answer
The Dead–Beat, Arms and the Boy, Anthem for Doomed Youth, Dulce et Decorum Est Click to show or hide the answer
Enough Rope (1926), Sunset Gun (1928), Death and Taxes (1931) – collections Click to show or hide the answer
Lady Lazarus, Blackberrying, Daddy; collections The Colossus, Ariel Click to show or hide the answer
The Haunted Palace (1839); The Raven (1845: "Quoth the Raven, 'Nevermore'") Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
The Rape of the Lock Click to show or hide the answer
The Cantos – a sequence of poems incorporating mythology, history, politics, economics and autobiography – was the life's work of (US–born poet – left unfinished when he died in 1972 aged 87) Click to show or hide the answer
Buried manuscripts with his wife, then dug them up again Click to show or hide the answer
Ode to Joy – used in Beethoven's 9th (Choral) Symphony, and as the anthem of the European Union Click to show or hide the answer
The Lady of the Lake Click to show or hide the answer
The Primrose and the Turtle Click to show or hide the answer
Ode to the West Wind, Ozymandias, Queen Mab, Prometheus Unbound, The Triumph of Life (unfinished) Click to show or hide the answer
Façade (1923 – set to music by William Walton) Click to show or hide the answer
Not Waving but Drowning Click to show or hide the answer
England fast bowler, also a published poet Click to show or hide the answer
The Faerie Queene (an allegory on Elizabeth I) Click to show or hide the answer
Bengali poet, Asia's first Nobel laureate (Literature, 1913) Click to show or hide the answer
The Idylls of the King, The Lotus Eaters, Come Into the Garden Maud, Locksley Hall Click to show or hide the answer
Welsh nationalist poet, died 1994: 'Two lands at last connected / Across the waters wide / And all the tolls collected / On the English side' Click to show or hide the answer
Oh Captain! My Captain! (1865 – a lament for Abraham Lincoln) Click to show or hide the answer
The Ballad of Reading Gaol Click to show or hide the answer
The Burial of Sir John Moore at Corunna Click to show or hide the answer
Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey (1798); I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud, My Heart Leaps Up, Composed upon Westminster Bridge September 3 1802 (all 1807) Click to show or hide the answer
The Second Coming; Easter 1916; The Lake Isle of Innisfree; A Prayer for my Daughter; Leda and the Swan; The Circus Animals' Desertion; The Tower (1928); The Winding Stair and Other Poems (1933); Last Poems and Plays (1940) Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017–18