Monkey

Quiz Monkey
What do you want to know?

You are here:

Buildings & Architecture
Theatres (etc.)

On this page:

Tate
Other

If you like my website, and/or if you've found it useful, please consider making a small donation to my Just Giving page, which I've set up just for this purpose. To begin with I'm collecting for a charity whose work I have benefitted from myself (and continue to do so): the British Heart Foundation. It would be great to raise £100 in the first month.

If you have already donated ... Thank You!

Theatres, Museums, Art Galleries, Concert Halls (etc.!)

Tate

The four Tate galleries, in order of opening, are:

Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer Click to show or hide the answer

The first of these was opened in 1897, on Millbank (on the northern bank of the Thames) as the National Gallery of British Art. It was renamed the Tate Gallery in 1932, after the sugar magnate Sir Henry Tate, who was instrumental in establishing the collection. The other three opened in 1988, 1993 and 2000 respectively, and the Tate Gallery was renamed Tate Britain when Tate Modern opened. Both London galleries have art dating up to the present day, but the Tate Modern collection begins in 1900 while Tate Britain goes back to 1500.

Former identity of the building that houses Tate Modern Click to show or hide the answer

Note that Bankside Power Station is a different building from Battersea Power Station, which was sold to a Malaysian company in 2012 for redevelopment as offices and flats.

Other

Dublin's most famous theatre: founded 1902 to promote Irish drama Click to show or hide the answer
Theatre in Harlem, New York, where James Brown gave his most famous performance(s) – his body lay 'in state' there following his death at Christmas 2006 Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's oldest museum (founded 1683); exhibits include the Alfred Jewel, found in Somerset 1693, and a death mask of Oliver Cromwell Click to show or hide the answer
Paris theatre: opened in 1865, named after an operetta by Offenbach; a rock venue since the early 1970s; 90 people were killed there during the terrorist attacks on Paris in 2015 Click to show or hide the answer
Theatre in Moscow's Sverdlov Square Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's Tank Museum (located at a Dorset army camp) Click to show or hide the answer
Replaced the Free Trade Hall, on its completion in 1996, as Manchester's principal concert venue and home of the Hallé Orchestra Click to show or hide the answer
The largest public building built in the UK in the 20th century: situated on Euston Road, St. Pancras; completed in 1998, Grade I listed in 2015 (one of the youngest buildings to be so recognised) Click to show or hide the answer
Major art collection housed at Pollok Country Park, Glasgow Click to show or hide the answer
The UK's oldest free public reference library: founded in Manchester in 1653 for the education of "the sons of honest, industrious and painful parents"; Marx and Engels used to meet there in 1845, their research leading eventually to the Communist Manifesto Click to show or hide the answer
Opened 1991 in the Memphis hotel where Martin Luther King was shot: US National Museum of Click to show or hide the answer
Tate Gallery extension opened 1987 to house the Turners Click to show or hide the answer
University of London art school whose gallery includes famous works by Van Gogh, Cezanne, Manet, etc., as well as many old masters – housed in Somerset House since 1989 Click to show or hide the answer
Original site of the Imperial War Museum (1920) Click to show or hide the answer
London's oldest theatre; official name is the Theatre Royal: also known as Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's oldest art gallery (associated with a public school) Click to show or hide the answer
Opened in 1869, at the intersection of the rue Richer and rue de Trevise, Paris Click to show or hide the answer
Concert hall in Manchester, built 1856 on the site of the Peterloo massacre of 1819 Click to show or hide the answer
Home to the Hallé Orchestra from 1856 to 1996
Christabel Pankhurst and Annie Kenney were arrested there in 1905 after heckling a Liberal Party meeting, and subsequently imprisoned, heralding a more militant campaign on the part of the Women's Social and Political Union
Kathleen Ferrier sang at its re–opening in 1951 after World War II bombing
In 1965, a member of the audience called Bob Dylan 'Judas'
All but the façade was demolished in the late 1990s, to be replaced by a hotel
One of Britain's oldest theatres: founded 1788 in Richmond, Yorkshire, by actor–manager Samuel Butler. Closed in 1848 and let as an auction house; re–opened as a theatre in 1963, expanded in 1996 and re–opened in 2003 after extensive restoration Click to show or hide the answer
Theatre in London's West End: opened in 1906 as the Hicks Theatre (after the actor–manager Seymour Hicks); renamed the Globe in 1909; renamed again in 1994, during the reconstructed Shakespeare's Globe on the South Bank, in honour of another famous actor, who died in 2000 aged 96 Click to show or hide the answer
Built in 1599 by the Lord Chamberlain's Men (Shakespeare's company) in Bankside, just outside the City of London; burned down in 1613, rebuilt in 1614, closed by the Puritans in 1642 (along with all other London theatres), and dismantled in 1644 to make way for houses; reconstructed in 1997 on an adjacent site Click to show or hide the answer
Historic cinema on Hollywood Boulevard, in whose forecourt stars (including Trigger and Lassie!) leave their signatures, footprints and handprints – known from 1973–2001 as Mann's Theatre Click to show or hide the answer
World famous museum and art gallery in St. Petersburg – often said to be the world's largest (contains almost 3 million items, including the world's largest collection of paintings) – started by Catherine the Great in 1764; 221 minor items, said to be worth $5 million, were said to have been stolen in July 2006 (former curators were suspected) Click to show or hide the answer
Natural amphitheatre near Los Angeles, used as a concert venue Click to show or hide the answer
Housed since 1936 in the former Bethlem (Bedlam) psychiatric hospital on Lambeth Road, London SE1 Click to show or hide the answer
Art gallery in the garden village of Port Sunlight, Merseyside: named after the wife of its founder; noted for its collection of 19th–century British paintings and sculptures Click to show or hide the answer
Venice opera house, burnt down 1996 Click to show or hide the answer
Milan's Opera House Click to show or hide the answer
Major art gallery in Paris, formerly a royal palace; Pavilion de l'Horloge; most famous pieces include the Mona Lisa and the Venus de Milo Click to show or hide the answer
Theatre in St. Petersburg, home of the Kirov Ballet (Kirov is the company's Soviet name, still used when touring abroad; in Russia it's known by the name of the theatre) Click to show or hide the answer
New York's principal opera house Click to show or hide the answer
Moscow theatre co–founded by Konstantin Stanislavsky Click to show or hide the answer
Paris gallery of impressionist and later art, housed in a former railway station Click to show or hide the answer
Occupies the whole of the North side of Trafalgar Square Click to show or hide the answer
Theatre near Waterloo Station, London, opened 1818 as the Royal Coburg; renamed the Royal Victoria Theatre 1833, then the Royal Victoria Hall 1880, by which time the current name was in use; bequeathed to Lilian Baylis 1912; company of this name founded 1929 under John Gielgud; succeeded in 1963 by the National Theatre Company, which was based here until 1976 when its own theatre opened on the South Bank (near Waterloo Bridge) Click to show or hide the answer
Official name of the Paris Opera Click to show or hide the answer
London theatre named (for obscure reasons) after a metallic element (atomic number 46) – opened in 1912, venue for a popular TV variety entertainment programme (Sunday Night at …) 1955–67, a regular venue for the Royal Variety Performance (especially 1966–78) Click to show or hide the answer
Famous jazz venue at 726 St. Peter Street in New Orleans's French Quarter (opened 1961) Click to show or hide the answer
Spanish national museum of painting and sculpture (Madrid) Click to show or hide the answer
Pre–war venue of the Promenade concerts, bombed in 1941 Click to show or hide the answer
12–acre complex on 6th Avenue, New York, developed 1929–40 as 'a palace for the people', a masterpiece of the Art Deco style Click to show or hide the answer
Amsterdam's State Museum (literally) Click to show or hide the answer
Built 1587 at Bankside, just outside the City of London, by entrepreneur and impresario Philip Henslowe; the Admiral's Men (second only to the Chamberlain's Men, led by Edward Alleyn) were in residence from 1594; dismantled around 1605; the site was excavated in 1989, and partially re–opened in 2007. Reproduced for the 1998 film Shakespeare in Love; possibly to be rebuilt in the north of England in the future Click to show or hide the answer
Opened in 1871 as the Hall of Arts and Sciences; venue for the Festival of Remembrance, on the Saturday before Remembrance Sunday, and for the Promenade Concerts since the end of World War II Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Only feature of the Festival of Britain (1951) still standing Click to show or hide the answer
London theatre: first opened in 1683, fifth rebuild (i.e. sixth theatre) completed 1998; was the home of, and gave its name to, ballet and opera companies, which later became the Royal Ballet and English National Opera Click to show or hide the answer
Extension to the National Gallery, built 1991 Click to show or hide the answer
London theatre, built 1881 by Richard D'Oyly Carte to stage the works of Gilbert & Sullivan, which came to be named after it; first theatre in the world to be lit by electricity Click to show or hide the answer
The world's biggest museum and research complex: founded in 1846 in Washington DC, it includes a zoo, an art gallery and a museum; exhibits include Lindbergh's Spirit of St. Louis Click to show or hide the answer
Theatre established in Scarborough by Alan Ayckbourn Click to show or hide the answer
Designed by Danish architect Jorn Utzon, who won a competition in 1957; opened 1973. Built on Bennelong Point, the site of a former tram depot Click to show or hide the answer
Art gallery on Millbank (alongside the Thames) famous for its nine Turner galleries Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's national gallery of international modern art: opened in the year 2000 in the former Bankside Power Station (not Battersea), on the south bank of the Thames in London Click to show or hide the answer
Britain's oldest theatre (built 1766) Click to show or hide the answer
Famous art gallery in Florence – one of the world's oldest and largest: built by the Medici family, 1560–81, to provide offices for their magistrates (hence the name); opened to the public in 1765 Click to show or hide the answer
Teatro San Sassiano – the first opera house, opened 1637; La Fenice (The Phoenix) – opera house, built 1790–2, burned down in 1836 and 1996 Click to show or hide the answer
London museum: originated in the Great Exhibition of 1851, opened May 1852 at Marlborough House, Pall Mall, as the Museum of Manufactures; moved to Somerset House, Strand, Sep 1852; renamed the Museum of Ornamental Art, 1853; moved to its current site 1857, renamed the South Kensington Museum; Science Museum started as part of it in 1893; current name dates to 1899 (the ceremony was Queen Victoria's last public engagement) Click to show or hide the answer
Art gallery in Hereford House, Manchester Square, London: exhibits include The Laughing Cavalier (Hals) and A Dance to the Music of Time (Poussin) Click to show or hide the answer
Liverpool art gallery – exhibits include Yeames's And When Did You Last See Your Father? Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017