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Clothes and Fashion

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People
Colours
Other

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Clothes and Fashion

See also Clothing Care, and Perfumes; and for questions about the business side of fashion, see Business.

People

Official dressmaker to the Queen, 1955–90 (cf. Norman Hartnell) Click to show or hide the answer
Fashion designer, born Ebbw Vale, Monmouthshire, in 1943; presented over 300 editions of BBC TV's The Clothes Show; once married to Sandie Shaw Click to show or hide the answer
Boxer who gave his name to a type of neckscarf Click to show or hide the answer
Devised by a 19th century British General, after he lost an arm – supported by a strap passing over the right shoulder (helps to support the sword) Click to show or hide the answer
Famous shoe designer, born in 1942 on the island of Palma in the Canary Islands – his father was Czech Click to show or hide the answer
Designer of the black uniforms worn by Nazi SS officers Click to show or hide the answer
First couturier to show a collection for men (1960); created a 'Space Age' collection in the 1960s Click to show or hide the answer
Popularised the "little black dress" as an essential wardrobe item (1920s) Click to show or hide the answer
Malaysian–born shoe designer, of Chinese descent and living in the UK since at least 1980; Tamara Mellon formed a company 1996 to sell his shoes ready to wear; products featured in The Sopranos, Sex and the City, The Devil Wears Prada, etc. Click to show or hide the answer
Son of a famous designer and businessman; designer of Lady Sarah Armstrong–Jones's wedding dress (1995) Click to show or hide the answer
Appointed Chief Executive of Next, on its launch in 1982; started 'George at Asda' in the 1990s; left Asda in 2000 following their acquisition by Walmart; launched Marks & Spencer's 'Per Una' collection, 2001 Click to show or hide the answer
First collection was the New Look (1947 – small shoulders, tight waist, big skirts, lower hemlines); also introduced the H–line or "sack look" (1954) and the A– and Y–lines (1955) Click to show or hide the answer
British PM after whom a black felt hat popular in the 1930s was named Click to show or hide the answer
Designers of Princess Di's wedding dress (1981) Click to show or hide the answer
Born in Russia 1877, moved to America to work in films; introduced the first cosmetics to be sold to the general public Click to show or hide the answer
British designer, born Gibraltar 1960: appointed chief designer at Givenchy 1995; moved to Dior (owned by the same group) 1996 Click to show or hide the answer
Designed the costumes for Madonna's 1990 Blonde Ambition world tour (including the trademark corset with cone bra), and for her 2006 Confessions tour; also for films such as The Cook, the Thief, His Wife and Her Lover and The Fifth Element Click to show or hide the answer
British designer, famous for her oversized T–shirts with slogans in big block letters, launched 1983 – copied by music journalist Paul Morley for Frankie Goes to Hollywood Click to show or hide the answer
Credited with making London a viable twentieth century fashion centre during the inter–war years; dressmaker to the Queen Mother from 1940, and to Queen Elizabeth II in 1957; designed the dresses for Princess Elizabeth's wedding (1947) and coronation (1953); knighted in 1977, died in 1985 (cf. Hardy Amies) Click to show or hide the answer
Born in 1961 in Morecambe, Lancashire: founder, along with his wife Gerardine, of Red or Dead (1982 – shoes, spectacles, bags, watches, etc.) Click to show or hide the answer
Brooke Shields modelled jeans in the 1980s, for Click to show or hide the answer
French tennis player of the 1920s, nicknamed The Crocodile; introduced a famous tennis shirt 1927; formed a clothing company in 1933 that became world famous for its crocodile logo Click to show or hide the answer
Chief Designer for Chanel, 1985– Click to show or hide the answer
Appointed by Adidas as Creative Director for Team GB in the 2012 Olympics Click to show or hide the answer
British designer, succeeded John Galliano as head designer at Givenchy in 1996; formed his own company in 2001; committed suicide in 2010, aged 40; his work was showcased in the hugely popular Savage Beauty exhibition, at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2011 and at London's Victoria & Albert museum in 2015 Click to show or hide the answer
Designed the uniform of the Swiss Guard (the Pope's personal bodyguards) Click to show or hide the answer
Born 1950, grew up in a Barnardo's home in Yorkshire; launched his first ready–to–wear collection 1975; clients have included Princess Diana and Sophie, Countess of Wessex Click to show or hide the answer
Became head designer of the luxury goods manufacturer founded in 1913 by her grandfather, in 1978; gave her name to the Miu Miu range, launched in 1993 Click to show or hide the answer
Named the miniskirt and popularised it in Britain (often credited with inventing it); began in 1955 with Bazaar, a fashion store on King's Road, Chelsea Click to show or hide the answer
British field marshal, gave his name to a type of sleeve Click to show or hide the answer
Hat designer – started by designing hats for his mother Gertrude to wear at Royal Ascot, from ~1969 (until her death in 1999) Click to show or hide the answer
Inventor of the Boss of the Plains – the original cowboy hat – of which the "ten–gallon" style (origin of the name unknown) was a development Click to show or hide the answer
Produced the first jeans in 1875 Click to show or hide the answer
Born Algeria, 1936; head designer at Dior, 1957–60; started his own company with partner Pierre Bergé, which pioneered fashions such as the beatnik look, safari jackets for men and women, tight trousers, tall thigh–high boots, and the classic tuxedo suit for women Le Smoking, in 1966; the first French couturier to offer a full prêt–á–porter (ready–to–wear) line; opened the first Rive Gauche store, selling the ready–to–wear range, in Paris in 1966, when its first customer was Catherine Deneuve; died of cancer in 2008, aged 71 Click to show or hide the answer
Irish–born milliner: designed the hat that Camilla Parker–Bowles wore for her wedding to Prince Charles Click to show or hide the answer
Designer of "that dress", held together by giant safety pins, worn by Liz Hurley in 1995 at the premiere of Four Weddings and a Funeral Click to show or hide the answer
New York–based designer: has designed wedding dresses for Victoria Beckham, Chelsea Clinton, Ivanka Trump, Alicia Keys, Mariah Carey, Avril Lavigne, Jennifer Lopez, Jennifer Garner, Sharon Stone, Sarah Michelle Gellar, Uma Thurman, Holly Hunter, Kate Hudson, Khloe Kardashian and Kim Kardashian (among many others!) Click to show or hide the answer
'The Punk Princess of Fashion': formed a partnership (both personal and professional) with Malcolm McLaren in the 1970s; their first collection was entitled Pirate (1981), followed by Savages (1981), Buffalo/Nostalgia Of Mud (1982), Punkature (1982), Witches (1983) and Worlds End (1984) Click to show or hide the answer
Launched a clothing line called Aneres, 2007 Click to show or hide the answer

Colours

Colour worn by Robin Hood and his Merry Men Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Supporters of Garibaldi wore Click to show or hide the answer
Supporters of General Franco wore Click to show or hide the answer
Supporters of Mussolini (and other Fascists) wore Click to show or hide the answer
The private army of Hitler's Nazi party wore Click to show or hide the answer

Other

Largest UK children's shoe size Click to show or hide the answer
Headgear named after a Crimean War battle Click to show or hide the answer
Known after the Crimean War as 'balaclavas' (see also in Types) Click to show or hide the answer
Small jewel or coloured spot, worn on the forehead by Indian women (sometimes known as a tilaka, tilak or tika); Hindi for "dot" Click to show or hide the answer
Hat with a point on either side, particularly associated with Napoleon Click to show or hide the answer
Launched in Paris, 1946, by former motor engineer Louis Reard Click to show or hide the answer
Hard felt hat, said to have been named after the nephew of the Earl of Leicester Click to show or hide the answer
Square cap with three or four peaks or horns, worn by Roman Catholic priests (black, red or purple) Click to show or hide the answer
Orphrey, Morse and Cope: worn by a Click to show or hide the answer
Butlin's had Redcoats; Pontin's had Click to show or hide the answer
Type of short jacket with long sleeves – also a type of dance (both originating in Spain) Click to show or hide the answer
All–enveloping cloak worn by Muslim women – particularly in Afghanistan Click to show or hide the answer
Worn by a priest: more familiar name (in English) for a soutane Click to show or hide the answer
Chinese silk dress with high collar and side slits (means "long dress" in Cantonese) Click to show or hide the answer
Garment in ancient Greece (worn by both sexes) Click to show or hide the answer
Frills on a dress shirt (also, the small intestine prepared as food) Click to show or hide the answer
Triangular black felt hat, developed from the bicorne, worn by most navies before World War II but since then only by certain officers on ceremonial occasions Click to show or hide the answer
A close fitting cap that covers the top, back, and sides of the head – usually made from white linen and tied under the chin; everyday wear for lower class men and women from the 12th to 15th centuries, nowadays associated with nuns Click to show or hide the answer
Opera hat (also known as a Gibus, after its French inventor; known in French as a chapeau claque because of the noise it makes when being folded) Click to show or hide the answer
An ascot is a type of Click to show or hide the answer
Originally (1830) a stiff fabric made with a horsehair weft and a cotton or linen warp; later (1850) came to mean a steel frame worn under the skirt of a dress Click to show or hide the answer
Short men's hair style, said to originate with rowers at Yale in the late 19th century – later became a de facto standard in the US armed forces, and popular with civilians in the 1950s Click to show or hide the answer
Word originating in Hindi (or Urdu and Persian) for a sash worn around the waist, especially as part of a man's formal suit Click to show or hide the answer
Reversible fabric, usually silk or linen, with a pattern woven into it, used for table linen, curtains, etc. Named after a Middle–Eastern capital city Click to show or hide the answer
Indian loincloth, as worn by Gandhi Click to show or hide the answer
Style of dress popular around 1780, also a style of straw hat worn as part of the same costume, named after a character in Dickens's Barnaby Rudge Click to show or hide the answer
Rope–soled shoe named after a Spanish grass (esparto) Click to show or hide the answer
Hooped structure worn under a skirt in Tudor & Stuart times Click to show or hide the answer
Hat named after a Moroccan city; also known as a tarbush Click to show or hide the answer
Stiff white skirt worn by Greek soldiers Click to show or hide the answer
Loose over–garment worn by Jews in the Middle Ages Click to show or hide the answer
Waterproof fabric, invented in 1951 by British industrialist Joseph Kagan, whose raincoats (known by this name) were favoured by Harold Wilson Click to show or hide the answer
Cotton fabric, whose name (from Malayan, meaning "striped") has come to be used for the checked design in which it is often produced Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional men's Scottish cap, made of thick woollen material, with a toorie (pom–pom) on top, often a rosette cockade (rosette) on the left side, and ribbons hanging down behind; often worn as part of Highland dress Click to show or hide the answer
Eton crop Click to show or hide the answer
Style of informal, waist–length jacket manufactured by Baracuta in Stockport, Cheshire from the 1930s; worn by Elvis Presley in King Creole, Steve McQueen in The Thomas Crown Affair, also by Liam Gallagher, Thierry Henry, etc.; officially named the G9, but more popularly after Ryan O'Neal's character in Peyton Place Click to show or hide the answer
Babushka and Mantilla are types of Click to show or hide the answer
Conical hat worn by ladies in 14th/15th century France Click to show or hide the answer
Banned by the Dress Act of 1746 (repealed in 1782) Click to show or hide the answer
Narrow skirt introduced in 1910 Click to show or hide the answer
Leggings made to look like skin–tight denim jeans – came into fashion in the late 2000s (decade); trade name owned by a Turkish clothing company; typically made of a cotton/spandex blend Click to show or hide the answer
Style of riding breeches, loose at the hips but tight on the thighs and below – named after an Indian city Click to show or hide the answer
Flat–topped cap with a straight peak, worn by French soldiers and gendarmes, and by soldiers on both sides in the American Civil War; from a Germanic word for a cap Click to show or hide the answer
The philibeg is a kind of Click to show or hide the answer
National costume of Japan Click to show or hide the answer
Launched in the 1960s by fashion entrepreneur 'Mr. Fish' Click to show or hide the answer
Powdered stibnite (antimony sulphide), used to darken the area around the eyes in Moslem and Asian countries Click to show or hide the answer
Named after a 19th century French acrobat Click to show or hide the answer
Item of clothing named after the boxer John L. Sullivan Click to show or hide the answer
Spandex: material better known in the UK as (trade name) Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional lace headscarf worn by Catholic women (Spanish word) Click to show or hide the answer
Invented around 1915 by the French–born British perfumier Eugène Rimmel, whose name is still used for it in several languages; pioneered more or less simultaneously in the USA by 19–year–old Tom Lyle Williams, initially for his elder sister Maybel; he named his company Maybelline after her Click to show or hide the answer
Distinctive belt worn by Sumo wrestlers Click to show or hide the answer
Bishop's head–dress Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional hat worn in Spain and Portugal, especially by bullfighters – named after the bullfighter who introduced it, along with the "suit of lights", in 1835 Click to show or hide the answer
Traditional costume of the court jester, or Harlequin in commedia dell'arte Click to show or hide the answer
Miniature ornament – traditionally, most often of ivory – hung from a sash in Japanese dress, used to carry things in (instead of pockets) Click to show or hide the answer
Full face veil worn by Muslim women as part of hajib Click to show or hide the answer
Broad, gaily embroidered sash worn by Japanese women and children Click to show or hide the answer
English city, gave its name (courtesy of its university) to a style of loose–fitting trousers, popular in the first half of the 20th century; also formal styles for shoes and shirts Click to show or hide the answer
Fine cashmere wool, made from the underfleece of a Himalayan goat; from the Persian for 'wool'; also used for a long broad shawl or scarf, or a rug, made from it Click to show or hide the answer
Topee, sola topee, salacot or topi: alternative names for the Click to show or hide the answer
Long tartan cloth worn over the shoulder in Scottish Highlands Click to show or hide the answer
Mistress of King Louis the Fifteenth of France: gave her name to a hairstyle Click to show or hide the answer
South American cape, like a blanket with a hole for the head Click to show or hide the answer
High–end fashion brand: started in 1913 as a leather goods shop in Milan Click to show or hide the answer
Miu Miu is a "less expensive" women's clothing and accessories brand (founded in 1993 by the grand–daughter of the original founder, who had inherited the company in 1978, and given her childhood nickname) of
Strips of cloth wound round the lower leg as a legging (from Hindi) Click to show or hide the answer
UK handbag manufacturer, founded in 1988, famous for its Scottish terrier logo Click to show or hide the answer
Colour traditionally worn by brides in India; also often chosen traditionally in China, where it symbolises good luck Click to show or hide the answer
Named after the French for overalls Click to show or hide the answer
A Brannock device (invented 1926 by Charles F. Brannock) measures Click to show or hide the answer
Fabric with varieties called Shantung and Dupioni Click to show or hide the answer
English name for a wide–brimmed, high–crowned hat, originating in Mexico: derived from the Spanish word for "shade", in Spanish it refers to any hat with a brim Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Tail coat with the tails removed – named after an English nobleman (1790s) Click to show or hide the answer
Skirt–like garment worn in Malaysia Click to show or hide the answer
'Tails' on a coat: short for Click to show or hide the answer
Sloppy Joe Click to show or hide the answer
Sleeveless or short–sleeved tunic worn by a herald Click to show or hide the answer
Name used in the UK for the synthetic material known in the USA as Dacron Click to show or hide the answer
Circle in a square (on a clothes label): can be Click to show or hide the answer
Named after the New York country club where first worn Click to show or hide the answer
Long, loose, heavy overcoat, usually with a belt at the back, named after an Irish region Click to show or hide the answer
Footwear product invented by the Italian climber Vitale Bramini Click to show or hide the answer
Colour worn for funerals in China and the Far East Click to show or hide the answer
Nun's head–dress Click to show or hide the answer
Humorous name given to the sharply–pointed shoes that were popular in the 1950s and 60s Click to show or hide the answer
Used by a boy scout (or cub scout, etc.) to keep his neckerchief (scarf) in place Click to show or hide the answer
Jewish skullcap Click to show or hide the answer
Veil worn in public by Moslem women Click to show or hide the answer
Priest's skullcap – from the Italian for a little gourd or pumpkin Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2018