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Geography
Places: Rest of the World

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Places: Rest of the World

This page is about places that aren't covered anywhere else (e.g. in Countries, States, or Towns and Cities). It includes such diverse entities as National Parks, suburbs and streets.

See also Places: United Kingdom.

Antarctic territory claimed by France; setting for the 2005 French nature documentary film March of the Penguins. Named by its discoverer, French explorer Jules Dumont d'Urville, after his wife; gave its name in turn to a breed of penguin (or possibly vice versa); the scientific base there is named Dumont d'Urville Click to show or hide the answer
Continent that produces around 48% of the world's cocoa and around 52% of its diamonds Click to show or hide the answer
Fortified mediaeval city, still standing, on borders of the Camargue Click to show or hide the answer
Prison on an island in San Francisco Bay Click to show or hide the answer
Military base in Nevada, whose existence is not widely acknowledged by the US government but which is believed by conspiracy theorists to contain evidence of extra–terrestrial contact Click to show or hide the answer
Puerto Rico: site of the world's largest telescope dish Click to show or hide the answer
Official name of Sixth Avenue, New York, since 1945 Click to show or hide the answer
Miami, Florida; San Juan, Puerto Rico; Bermuda: these are the three extremities of the Click to show or hide the answer
Pool found in Jerusalem in the 19th century (near the Sheep Gate), believed to be that mentioned in John 5; associated with healing, gave its name to a town or village in Snowdonia, famous for its slate quarries (among other places) Click to show or hide the answer
The only one of New York's five boroughs that's on the mainland Click to show or hide the answer
Coney Island Amusement Park is in Click to show or hide the answer
Region of France, famous for its wines: also (because of the wine) gives its name to a deep red colour Click to show or hide the answer
County Clare: part of one of Europe's largest karst landscapes, and Ireland's smallest national park (designated in 1998; less than 6 square miles) – famous for its wild flowers, caves and dolmens Click to show or hide the answer
Region of southern India, between the Eastern Ghats and the Coromandel Coast: gave its name to a series of wars in the 18th century betwen the British and French East India Companies (and their Indian allies), which included the Battle of Plassey; from a Tamil phrase meaning 'coast dance' Click to show or hide the answer
New York: lies between 59th and 110th Streets Click to show or hide the answer
Popular holiday region in north–eastern Greece, famous for its three peninsulas or 'fingers' ('legs' in Greek) – on one of which Mount Athos stands Click to show or hide the answer
Paris's most prestigious thoroughfare: runs from the Place de la Concorde to the Place Charles de Gaulle (f.k.a. Place de l'Étoile), location of the Arc de Triomphe Click to show or hide the answer
Area of France in the Saône–et–Loire département, Burgundy region: gives its name to breeds of cattle, horse and sheep Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Misleadingly–named peninsula in Brooklyn, New York, famous for its amusement parks; name comes from the Dutch for 'rabbit' Click to show or hide the answer
Picturesque hilly area of western Co. Galway, Ireland, including the Twelve Bens and the Maumturks; designated as a National Park in 1980 Click to show or hide the answer
The only break in the Pan–American Highway, caused by a swathe of swamp and rainforest; stretches for about 100 miles, spanning the border of Panama and Colombia; named after a province of Panama, which in turn is named after the language of the indigenous people Click to show or hide the answer
US National Park (California): includes Badwater Basin – thought to be the lowest land point in the Western Hemisphere, until the discovery of Laguna del Carbón in Argentina Click to show or hide the answer
Anaheim, California, is the home of (opened in 1955) Click to show or hide the answer
Natural region of tropical wetlands in southern Florida: effectively a slow–moving river, 60 miles wide and 100 miles long, flowing south out of Lake Okeechobee; about 20% of it (the southern part) was dedicated as a National Park in 1947 Click to show or hide the answer
Coral cay archipelago that forms the southernmost extreme of the continental United States Click to show or hide the answer
Name shared by a region of north–west Spain, on the Bay of Biscay, and a region of Eastern Europe which is partly in Poland and partly in Ukraine Click to show or hide the answer
Name given to an area of Manhattan, New York, said by some to originate in a remark made in 1835 by Davy Crockett; also used for films starring Ronald Reagan (1939) and Angelina Jolie (1998), and a TV programme featuring Gordon Ramsay (he was succeeded in the UK version by Gary Rhodes, then Marco Pierre White) Click to show or hide the answer
Glacial valley in County Wicklow, Ireland, famous for a monastic settlement founded in the 6th century by St Kevin Click to show or hide the answer
Mount Lee, Los Angeles, is famous for Click to show or hide the answer
Stanley Market; Star Ferry; Happy Valley and Sha Tin racecourses Click to show or hide the answer
Ireland's oldest National Park (created in 1932) Click to show or hide the answer
Urban area at the southern tip of the Hong Kong peninsula: home to 2.1 million people – approx. 30% of the population of the Hong Kong SAR (Hong Kong Island has 1.3 million – approx. 20%) Click to show or hide the answer
Fortified complex in the centre of Moscow – sometimes called "the city within a city" Click to show or hide the answer
Mainland part of Newfoundland province (Canada) Click to show or hide the answer
Flat, forested area of south–West France, between Bordeaux and Biarritz Click to show or hide the answer
Former Portuguese colony, near Hong Kong, and like Hong Kong a special administrative region of China: famous for gambling and motor racing; Wikipedia lists it as the world's most densely populated state or territory, and describes it as "the world's largest gambling centre"; its most famous race is a Formula 3 GP (there are many others) Click to show or hide the answer
New York thoroughfare associated with the advertising industry – named after the 4th President Click to show or hide the answer
Famous sporting and concert venue in New York: home to the Knicks and Liberty (basketball – men's & women's), Rangers (ice hockey), Knights and CityHawks (indoor football) Click to show or hide the answer
Arabic term for a large portion of North West Africa, including all of Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia – means "place of sunset" or "the West" Click to show or hide the answer
New York borough that includes Central Park Click to show or hide the answer
Area on the Gironde estuary, containing the famous Chateau Latour vineyard Click to show or hide the answer
Mountainous region of Jordan, bordering the Dead Sea – mentioned in Psalms, but most famous in Britain today after Stephen Fry's unexplained use of a quotation from Psalms as the title of his 1997 autobiography Click to show or hide the answer
Paris: artists' quarter Click to show or hide the answer
Part of the Colorado Plateau, on the borders of Utah and Arizona, made famous in the films of John Ford (notably Stagecoach and The Searchers); also used in Marlboro adverts, 2001: a Space Odyssey, The Eiger Sanction, etc. etc. Click to show or hide the answer
The world's largest and most northerly National Park Click to show or hide the answer
Region of the Pacific Ocean, variously defined as consisting of the three subregions of Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia, or the all islands in the region between Asia and the Americas, including Australasia and the Malay Archipelago Click to show or hide the answer
Dublin's main thoroughfare: originally named Drogheda Street, then (from the late 1700s) Sackville Street; renamed in 1924 in honour of a 19th century nationalist leader, whose statue stands at its southern end; nicknamed 'the street of the Three Adulterers' because it also has (or had) statues of Charles Stewart Parnell and Lord Nelson – all three being alleged adulterers. (Nelson's Pillar was blown up by republican activists in 1966) Click to show or hide the answer
French name for the Straits of Dover Click to show or hide the answer
The southernmost region of South America, extending from the Andes to the Atlantic and covering parts of both Argentina and Chile Click to show or hide the answer
Paris: location of the Arc de Triomphe (known prior to 1970 as Place de l'Étoile) Click to show or hide the answer
Paris: square formerly known as Place Louis XV and Place de la Revolution; known by its current name 1795–1826, and since 1830; the Luxor Obelisk (a.k.a. Cleopatra's Needle) has stood there since 1836 Click to show or hide the answer
Paris: former name of the Place Charles de Gaulle – because of the twelve streets that radiate from it Click to show or hide the answer
Historical region on the shore of the Baltic Sea, partly in Germany but mainly in Poland; name comes from the Slavic for "land by the sea"; best known today because of the breed of dog that was named after it Click to show or hide the answer
Moscow: the Lublyanka is a Click to show or hide the answer
Metonym of the French Foreign Ministry – from the street in Paris where its headquarters are located Click to show or hide the answer
New York's largest borough, by area; site of its two major airports (LaGuardia and John F. Kennedy International); also home to the US Open tennis tournament (Flushing Meadow) and the New York Mets baseball team Click to show or hide the answer
Red Square, Moscow, was known before 1917 as Click to show or hide the answer
Industrial area of north–western Germany (North Rhine–Westphalia) – including the cities of Duisburg, Oberhausen, Essen, Bochum, Gelsenkirchen, Dortmund; named after the river that flows through it (or past it), and flows into the Rhine near Duisburg Click to show or hide the answer
Bay of Lake Huron that gives its name to Bay City, Michigan (shares its name with the river that flows through Bay City) Click to show or hide the answer
Resort area near Salzburg, Austria – name means "Salt Room Estate" – named after the company that was responsible for running the salt mines of the Hapsburg empire Click to show or hide the answer
Paris suburb, location of the Stade de France Click to show or hide the answer
Tanzanian national park which includes the Ngorongoro crater Click to show or hide the answer
Suburb of Paris, known for its fine porcelain; also the home of the International Bureau of Weights & Measures Click to show or hide the answer
Prison in Ossinning, New York Click to show or hide the answer
Memorial to John Lennon in New York's Central Park, inaugurated in 1985 Click to show or hide the answer
Luxury resort and casino, opened in 1979 in South Africa's North West Province (about 2 hours' drive from Johannesburg) Click to show or hide the answer
New York: Broadway and 42nd street intersect at Click to show or hide the answer
Unter Den Linden in Berlin, Alexander Garden in Moscow, Arc de Triomphe in Paris Click to show or hide the answer
Famous tourist attraction in Rome, built in 1762: tradition has it that if you throw a coin into it (with your right hand over your left shoulder, or left hand over right shoulder, with your back to it) you will return to Rome Click to show or hide the answer
Near Kissimee, which itself is near Orlando, Florida (opened in 1971) Click to show or hide the answer
Strip of coastline surrounded by Namibia but belonging to South Africa; includes the town of Swapokmund Click to show or hide the answer
Weapons testing range in South Australia, opened jointly by the British and Australian governments in 1947; named after an Australian aboriginal spear'throwing device Click to show or hide the answer
The world's oldest and the USA's largest National Park, famous for geysers etc., established in 1872; in the Rocky Mountains, chiefly in Wyoming Click to show or hide the answer
National Park in the Sierra Nevada, California: founded in 1890, noted for its lakes, waterfalls (including the world's third highest, named after the park) and groves of giant sequoia trees; also Bridalveil Falls, El Capitan (rock face), Half Dome (peak) Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017