Monkey

Quiz Monkey
What do you want to know?

You are here:

History
Places in History: United Kingdom

If you like my website, and/or if you've found it useful, please consider making a small donation to my Just Giving page, which I've set up just for this purpose. To begin with I'm collecting for a charity whose work I have benefitted from myself (and continue to do so): the British Heart Foundation. It would be great to raise £100 in the first month.

If you have already donated ... Thank You!

Places in History: United Kingdom

This page is about places in the United Kingdom that have historical significance for one reason or another. It may be a place where some significant event occurred (e.g. Berkeley Castle), or it may have had a significance at some point or period in history that it no longer has (e.g. Coalbrookdale), or it may simply be somewhere that's of interest for historical reasons (e.g. South Crofty tin mine).

See also Places in History: Rest of the World.

Fortress hiding place in the Somerset Levels, from which Alfred the Great went on to defeat the Danes at the Battle of Edington in May 878; it's while hiding here that he is supposed to have burnt the cakes Click to show or hide the answer
Jail in which John Bunyan wrote Pilgrim's Progress Click to show or hide the answer
Gloucestershire: Edward II was murdered at Click to show or hide the answer
Camp Hill and Kings Norton (both the scenes of battles in the English Civil War) are areas of Click to show or hide the answer
William of Orange landed 1688 with an army of 12,000, to claim the throne from James II Click to show or hide the answer
Island in Poole Harbour: venue of the first Boy Scout camp, 1907 Click to show or hide the answer
Hertfordshire oil storage depot, scene of what was said to be Europe's biggest peace–time fire, 2005 – owned by Total (60%) and Texaco (40%) Click to show or hide the answer
Street in the East End of London where anti-fascist demonstrators clashed with police protecting a march by the blackshirts of Oswald Mosley's British Union of Fascists, in 1936, in the so–called Battle of ... Click to show or hide the answer
Prince Charles's investiture as Prince of Wales (1969) took place in Click to show or hide the answer
Cornish town at the centre of a scandal over the pollution of its water supply in 1988 (when 20 tons of aluminium sulphate was poured into the wrong tank at a water treatment plant on Bodmin Moor) Click to show or hide the answer
Castle on the Isle of Wight, where Charles I was imprisoned from 1647 until January 1649 Click to show or hide the answer
Town on the River Medway (Kent): home to a Royal Navy dockyard for over 500 years until its closure in 1984; now a museum and heritage site Click to show or hide the answer
Confederation of coastal towns in Kent and Sussex, formed in late Anglo–Saxon times for military and trade purposes, but declined with the growth of other ports; surrendered their charters in 1685 and now entirely ceremonial Click to show or hide the answer
Shropshire village where Abraham Darby built the world's first iron smelting works, from 1709 Click to show or hide the answer
Most southerly town reached by Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Jacobites in 1745 Click to show or hide the answer
Derbyshire village that cut itself off in 1665 to prevent the spread of the plague Click to show or hide the answer
Pembrokeshire town: scene of the last (unsuccessful) invasion of Britain, in 1797 Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Chemical plant where 28 people died in an explosion, 1974 Click to show or hide the answer
Castle in Northants where Richard III was born and Mary Queen of Scots was executed Click to show or hide the answer
Scottish glen in which 38 members of Clan MacDonald were massacred by soldiers of the Earl of Argyll's Regiment of Foot, in February 1692 (for more details, see Events, Periods etc.) Click to show or hide the answer
Prince Charles Edward raised his standard in 1745 at Click to show or hide the answer
Brighton hotel bombed by the IRA 1984, during the Conservative Party Conference Click to show or hide the answer
Berkshire RAF base where a 'Women's Peace Camp' was set up in protest against the siting of Cruise missiles there, 1981–2000 (returned to common use in 1997) Click to show or hide the answer
1558: Princess Elizabeth was told of her accession to the throne while sitting under an oak tree at Click to show or hide the answer
Branch or inlet of the Firth of Clyde, used as a submarine base during WWII and as a base for US Polaris and Poseidon nuclear submarines 1961–92 (deemed unnecessary following the demise of the Soviet Union) Click to show or hide the answer
Football ground where 66 people died, 2 January 1971 Click to show or hide the answer
London building where 25 staff and visitors, and policeman Trevor Lock, were held hostage for 6 days in 1980 by gunmen demanding the release of Arab prisoners; after one of the hostages was killed by the gunmen, the building was stormed by SAS personnel who abseiled from the roof and forced entry through the windows (Operation Nimrod); they killed all but one of the gunmen; all hostages were rescued, except for one who was shot by the gunmen Click to show or hide the answer
Mountain in the Peak District – the highest in the National Park, and in Derbyshire: scene of a mass trespass in 1932 in protest at the denial of access to areas of open country Click to show or hide the answer
Lazar Houses: built in the reign of King Stephen in Burton Lazars, Leics, to house Click to show or hide the answer
Town in the Scottish Borders where Pan Am flight 103 landed after a bomb exploded on board, in 1988 Click to show or hide the answer
Name of the RAF station where the "H–blocks" of Maze Prison were built in 1976 Click for more information Click to show or hide the answer
Devonshire seaside town(s), devastated by floods August 1952 Click to show or hide the answer
Market town, in Powys: the seat of Owain Glyndwr's Welsh Parliament in 1404, where he was crowned Prince of Wales – on which grounds it claims to be the "ancient capital of Wales" Click to show or hide the answer
Tree near Edwinstowe, Notts – said to be the site of Robin Hood's headquarters – first recorded use of this name was in 1790 Click to show or hide the answer
Ancient forest in Hampshire, declared a royal hunting ground by William I in 1097; designated a National Park in 2005 Click to show or hide the answer
Model industrial community set up on Clydeside, early 19th century, by Robert Owen Click to show or hide the answer
During the Civil War (1641–5) and the Great Plague of London (1665–6), the royal courts (of Charles I and II respectively) moved to Click to show or hide the answer
North Sea oilrig that exploded in 1988 with the loss of 167 lives Click to show or hide the answer
Public space where Francis Drake was (according to popular tradition) playing bowls when the Spanish Armada was sighted Click to show or hide the answer
Street in Liverpool, known as "the Harley Street of the North"; the Anglican cathedral stands at one end of it; birthplace of W. E. Gladstone (1809) and poet Arthur Clough (1819); No. 59 is owned by the National Trust and is a museum to the Irish–born photographer (Edward) Chambré Hardman, who lived and worked there (active 1920–50; died 1988) Click to show or hide the answer
Site in the New Forest that commemorates the death of King William II Click to show or hide the answer
Thames–side meadow where King John put his seal to the Magna Carta (1215) Click to show or hide the answer
Ancient forest in Wiltshire, location of the seat of the Seymour family in Tudor times – Wulfhall, which inspired the 2009 Booker prize–winning novel by Hilary Mantel Click to show or hide the answer
Capital of the Kingdom of Alba (900–1286) – near Perth – famous today as the site of the Abbey where Scottish kings were crowned, and home of the famous Coronation Stone Click to show or hide the answer
West Sussex town hit by a tornado in January 1998 Click to show or hide the answer
English city: flooded in 1864, when Dale Dyke Dam (Bradfield Reservoir) burst as it was being filled for the first time Click to show or hide the answer
Royal forest in Nottinghamshire, famous through its historical association with Robin Hood Click to show or hide the answer
Street in Stepney, east London; scene of a gun battle in 1911 when police besieged a Latvian anarchist gang after three constables were shot dead; leader Peter Piatkov (Peter the Painter) was never caught; home secretary Winston Churchill caused a major political row by taking personal charge Click to show or hide the answer
The last Cornish tin mine to close (1998) Click to show or hide the answer
London underground station at which 27–year–old Brazilian national Jean Charles de Menezes was shot by police in 2005 Click to show or hide the answer
Scene of Elizabeth I's famous speech ("I know I have the body of a weak, feeble woman ... ") to the troops assembled by the Earl of Leicester to fight the Armada Click to show or hide the answer
Inner city area of Liverpool, also known (from its postcode) as Liverpool 8: scene of violent riots in 1981 Click to show or hide the answer
Prison that Ronnie Biggs escaped from in 1965 Click to show or hide the answer
Cheshire town: two IRA bombs exploded on 20 March 1993, killing two children – one (Johnathan Ball, aged 3) at the scene, the other (Tim Parry, aged 12) five days later when his life support machine was switched off Click to show or hide the answer
Area of London's east end that saw the murders of 11 prostitutes between 1888 and 1891 – all of which have been ascribed at various times to "Jack the Ripper" Click to show or hide the answer
Uffington (Oxfordshire, prehistoric), Westbury (Wiltshire, earliest record 1742), and Kilburn (North Yorkshire, 1857) are the sites of Click to show or hide the answer

© Haydn Thompson 2017